Higher Education Quick Takes

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Tuesday, November 3, 2009 - 3:00am

The University of Mississippi has altered its fight song to discourage a chant of "the South will rise again," based on the old version. With many fans continuing that chant -- which many find offensive -- Chancellor Dan Jones said Monday that either the chant stops, or he'll bar the song from being played at football games, the Associated Press reported. "The University of Mississippi is a warm and welcoming place. So many have worked hard to make sure our image moves forward, and we don't want anything to hurt that," Jones said in a speech.

Tuesday, November 3, 2009 - 3:00am

About 2,700 teaching and research assistants walked off the job Monday at McMaster University, in Ontario, The Canadian Press reported. Negotiations have resumed on a new contract.

Monday, November 2, 2009 - 3:00am

St. Petersburg State University has clarified rules -- of concern to many scholars -- about who must seek approval before presenting or publishing work abroad, The New York Times reported. Researchers in the humanities and social sciences will not be covered by the regulations.

Monday, November 2, 2009 - 3:00am

Idaho State University has fired Habib Sadid, a tenured engineering professor who had been suspended, the Associated Press reported. A faculty panel recently released an opinion that there was not enough evidence to justify Sadid's dismissal, but the university president said that his ouster was in the best interests of the institution. Sadid has been a long-time critic of the university's leaders and he says he is being fired for his dissent, while the university says that he crossed lines from dissent into abusive and unfair behavior.

Monday, November 2, 2009 - 3:00am

The tenure denials of four women at DePaul University are leading to student protests and threats of legal action, the Chicago Tribune reported. Of 33 professors who went up for tenure this year, seven were rejected, five of whom were women. In the cases of four represented by the same lawyer, departmental reviews were quite positive, but a university-wide committee -- with professors in other fields -- raised questions about the candidacies. The university, without talking about specific cases, has defended the process as free of bias.

Monday, November 2, 2009 - 3:00am

Students at Lincoln University in Pennsylvania have been protesting lack of access to a library, poor food service, and the way police treated a student who organized their protests, The Philadelphia Daily News reported. The student -- who was inspired to get more vocal after finding a moth in her salad at the university cafeteria -- staged an 11-day hunger strike over the issues. The library has been closed for renovations since January 2008 and students must use trailers to get access to books, which the students say take 24 hours to arrive. Lincoln officials say that they are working to get the library project and other improvements completed, but will not comment on the protests.

Monday, November 2, 2009 - 3:00am

Samim Anghaie, and his wife, Susan, were arrested Friday and charged with fraud for using $3.7 million in government contracts for personal uses, such as the purchase of cars and homes, The Gainesville Sun reported. The two are also charged with submitting false information to get the contracts from various federal agencies. Samim Anghaie has been director of Florida's Innovative Nuclear Space Power and Propulsion Institute. The couple's lawyer said that they had no comment on the charges.

Monday, November 2, 2009 - 3:00am

Just weeks after releasing its latest ranking of universities worldwide, and receiving some criticism over the methodology, The Times Higher announced a new partner for the project and a decision to revisit the methodology. Ann Mroz, editor of Times Higher, said in a statement in her publication that while she was pleased with the influence of the rankings, "we acknowledge the criticism and now want to work with the sector to produce a legitimate and robust research tool for academics and university administrators." The new partner for the project will be Thomson Reuters.

Friday, October 30, 2009 - 3:00am

Just under 11.5 million students were enrolled in a college or university in the fall of 2008, and 39.6 percent of all Americans aged 18 to 24 were enrolled -- both figures that set records, according to an analysis released Thursday by the Pew Research Center. Community college enrollments accounted for almost all of the gains over the previous year, consistent with the enrollment booms they experience when the economy falters.

Friday, October 30, 2009 - 3:00am

Presidents of Division I universities in the National Collegiate Athletic Association moved ahead Thursday on several changes designed to rein in perceived abuses and excesses in big-time college basketball. The Division I Board of Directors approved a set of recommendations aimed at limiting the flow of money to third parties (like informal sports agents) who have increasingly cropped up in the college recruiting pipeline, and increasing the penalties against college coaches who violate the new guidelines. The board also endorsed and put on the agenda for a vote at January's NCAA Convention a set of proposals that would cut the length of the men's basketball season by one game, to 28, and restrict the number of physical education courses that basketball players who transfer from two-year colleges can count toward their credentials. The association's Executive Committee also formally began its search to replace Myles Brand as the NCAA's president.

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