Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

Subscribe to Inside Higher Ed | Quick Takes
Monday, November 9, 2009 - 3:00am

Ma Ying-jeou, Taiwan's president, announced plans for significant expansions of the island's foreign student population and university courses taught in English, Taipei Times reported. “Higher education in Taiwan should not keep its doors closed any more. We need to promote the idea of studying in Taiwan and attract great students to Taiwan,” he said.

Monday, November 9, 2009 - 3:00am

With a decision expected this week at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology on a proposal to boycott Israeli universities and academics, American groups are stepping up opposition to the boycott. The American Association of University Professors released a statement Friday urging the university to reject the boycott idea. "AAUP’s policy against academic boycotts -- detailed in our 2006 statement on the subject -- is based on the still more fundamental principle that free discussion among all faculty members worldwide should be encouraged, not inhibited. Certainly those Norwegian faculty members already working on joint projects with Israeli colleagues should not have their academic freedom taken away from them. In the long run, more, not less, dialogue with Israeli faculty members is an important way to promote peace in the region," the statement says. Also last week, the Anti-Defamation League called on the European Union to disqualify from its exchange programs any university that adopts a boycott policy. Organizers of the boycott movement at the university could not be reached, but they outlined their position online, saying that "Israeli universities and other institutions of higher education have played a key role in the policy of oppression. A substantial proportion of academics are directly involved in the country’s advanced weapon industry; social scientists play a central role in the construction of a nation of occupation; historians and archaeologists are important in the development of the Zionist ideology and renouncement of Palestinian history and identity." A spokeswoman said that Rector Torbjørn Digernes has drafted a resolution for the board to reject the boycott call. The resolution is available (in Norwegian) here.

Monday, November 9, 2009 - 3:00am

Most of us have probably hit "send" once or twice before being certain that the correct person (and only the correct person) was in the address field. But when it comes to misfiring e-mail, two employees of Cornell University's business school may have set a new standard for embarrassment. The sexually explicit exchanges between these employees (both married, not to each other) were sent accidentally on Friday to a global list at the business school, and now are appearing in numerous places online. A Cornell spokesman confirmed the incident and said that, "an e-mail was sent by the university shortly after the incident to all those who may have received the accidental mailing, with an apology and a request that recipients discard the accidental mailing."

Monday, November 9, 2009 - 3:00am

A former student at the University of Michigan at Flint is suing the institution for $40 million, saying he dropped out and suffered from debt and depression because of the way the institution responded to a complaint about a grade, The Flint News reported. The former student charges that the university, in a post-Virginia Tech overreaction, perceived him as a threat, and the student has obtained e-mail messages from safety officers at the university as saying he was “strange, creepy and had an attitude." University officials declined to discuss the suit in detail, but said that the institution had done nothing wrong and would defend itself in court.

Friday, November 6, 2009 - 3:00am

Charles Nemeroff, an Emory University psychiatrist whose work has been highly influential and who has been at the center of a conflict-of-interest scandal, is moving to the University of Miami as its new psychiatry chair. Nemeroff resigned from the chair's position at Emory in December, amid growing Congressional scrutiny of payments he received from GlaxoSmithKline and did not report -- in violation of university rules, which are designed to ensure that federally supported research is not tainted by unknown financial conflicts of interest by researchers. The Miami Herald quoted Pascal Goldschmidt, dean of the University of Miami medical school, as acknowledging the controversy, but also calling Nemeroff "an extraordinary psychiatrist and scientist."

Friday, November 6, 2009 - 3:00am

Two students -- backed by the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education -- are suing the Tarrant County College District, charging that its limits on rallies are violations of First Amendment rights, the Associated Press reported. The college permits protest activities only in a limited free speech zone, and requires advance permission to schedule events there. College officials say that the rules are consistent with federal and state requirements. But the students say that they are being blocked from engaging in legitimate protest. The students want to rally on behalf of the right to carry concealed weapons on campus and they say that they are being barred from wearing empty holsters on campus as an expression of their views.

Friday, November 6, 2009 - 3:00am

The Institute for College Access and Success on Thursday unveiled a new Web site, College InSight, designed to provide a wide range of data about colleges -- information on prices and financial aid, socioeconomic, racial and other diversity, and student outcomes. The site, a resource for parents as well as policy makers, allows users to build their own data sets based on the institutions and data elements of their choosing.

Friday, November 6, 2009 - 3:00am

The U.S. Senate on Thursday approved a 2010 spending bill for many federal science programs that would provide $6.9 billion for the National Science Foundation, including $5.55 billion for research, $122 million for research equipment and facilities; and $857 million for the agency's education programs. In passing the bill, the Senate rejected an amendment that would have eliminated funding for the NSF's political science program -- though the amendment garnered 36 votes.

Friday, November 6, 2009 - 3:00am

A state panel has concluded that the University of Vermont and five state colleges in the state should not be merged, the Associated Press reported. The idea of a merger has been much debated in the state as a way to save money, but the panel concluded that the cultures of the university and the state colleges are too different. Instead, the panel suggested that they look for new ways to collaborate on selected programs.

Thursday, November 5, 2009 - 3:00am

The National Collegiate Athletic Association has levied a weighty set of punishments against Miles College for major violations in all 10 of its sports. Wednesday, in a public report, the Division II Committee on Infractions said that “from the 2004-05 though 2008-09 academic years, Miles allowed 124 athletes in all 10 of its sports to practice, compete, receive travel expenses and/or receive athletically related aid while ineligible.” These students were ineligible for numerous reasons, but most did not meet the NCAA’s initial or continuing academic requirements to play. The committee discovered that Miles “did not have written procedures for certifying the eligibility of initial enrollees, continuing student-athletes and transfers.” During the investigation of this violation, the committee noted that the former director of athletics “provided false and misleading information to the NCAA enforcement staff.” In another violation, the committee reported that the former head track coach “knowingly allowed six student-athletes to participate under assumed names during the 2006-7 academic year.” Also, the committee found that the track coach at the time “worked with an administrator at another institution to fabricate results from two women’s outdoor track meets to make it appear that Miles College had enough participants to meet NCAA sport sponsorship minimums." As punishment, Miles will serve a four-year probation, all of its sports are banned from the postseason this year and all games during which ineligible athletes competed must be vacated. The former athletics director and track coach, whom the report did not identify by name but who could be identified through news reports as Augustus James and Marcus Dowdell, also have four- and three-year show-cause orders, respectively -- meaning any institution that hires them during that period must report to the NCAA how it will monitor their behavior.

Pages

Back to Top