Technology and Learning

Technology and Learning

A space for conversation and debate about learning and technology

May 17, 2010 - 9:27pm
This Thursday (5/20 3:00pm EST) I'm participating in a Webinar entitled "Everything Librarians and Learning Technologists Wanted to Know About Each Other and Never Bothered to Ask: An Open Forum". You can register (for free) at the blendedlibrarian.org site. The description of the webinar reads:
May 16, 2010 - 9:02pm
I'm not trying to pay homage to Nicholas Carr and his new book The Shallows: What the Internet Is Doing to Our Brains. I don't think I'll read Carr's new book, as the article that it grows out of -- "Is Google Making Us Stupid?" -- sort of annoyed me.
May 14, 2010 - 2:00am
I received a few e-mails this week from people who work in the online for-profit sector, following my offer to review and report on their online courses. The communications, I think, we're aimed at trying to suss out any “anti for-profit” biases that I may harbor, particularly if they were going to let me loose to evaluate their courses. Fair enough. I thought it made sense to think about my own biases, and then state them for the record.
May 12, 2010 - 9:20pm
I heard a great idea from a faculty member today: lecture capture for prelims. Apparently, students are making use of recorded lectures to prepare for prelim questions in specialized topics. The recorded lectures are golden; as the student can be pretty sure they will be able to focus on the topics and problems the professor on their prelim committee cares most about.
May 11, 2010 - 9:26pm
My offer is to evaluate the quality of a (hopefully representative) sample of your online course design and report the results in this space. I will not be able to evaluate the quality of your faculty, or the interaction in the course. This means that my evaluation will be limited to judging the quality of the course design and course curricular materials available through your online platform. Why do I make this offer? Mainly, I'm curious if any online for-profit colleges will take me up on it.
May 10, 2010 - 9:08pm
"I see you rolling your eyes. That’s right, you: the one in the fake-vintage rock ’n’ roll T-shirt and thick-framed glasses reading this on an iPhone at the sidelines of your daughter’s soccer game. But you know exactly what I’m talking about, pal."
May 9, 2010 - 9:06pm
The list of ways that the University of Mary Washington sets the example in learning and technology is indeed long. UMW is at the forefront of a movement to provide open access to course material and faculty and student contributions through its pioneering UMW Blogs platform. Check out the "Courses" section of UMW blogs for an aggregated view of the most recent semester’s classes available for viewing on this open platform.
May 6, 2010 - 9:36pm
Can somebody help me get a handle on the curricular media platform landscape? A colleague of mine uses the short-hand of a "YouTube for college media". Seems to me that the explosion of media being produced on campus, combined with the increasing demand to utilize existing rich media inside the LMS and library systems for courses, would be driving a significant market in curricular media platforms. I was recently asked by a smart guy I know who works for an educational technology company, "what would be your boiled down requirements for a media management platform?"
May 5, 2010 - 9:41pm
Let us engage in a thought experiment. You are teaching a course, and you want your students to participate in an online discussion/debate around some materials. The content that you want your students to discuss and debate is the PBS Frontline episode, "College Inc." that aired May 4th. The online discussion that you want your students to participate in is the one kicked off by Dean Dad -
May 4, 2010 - 9:45pm
Three predictions about how changes in the curricular mediums will alter the learning process. Prediction 1: Curricular content will be consumed in shorter chunks, across more diffuse times, and in multiple places. Prediction 2: The amount of time any given individual (student) spends consuming curricular content will decrease. Prediction 3: The total amount of curricular content consumed will increase, as prior "non-students" and "student non-consumers" evolve into curricular consumers.

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