Higher Education Quick Takes

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Tuesday, April 12, 2011 - 3:00am

The Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, one of Korea's top universities, has seen four student suicides since January, The Wall Street Journal reported, and a faculty member killed himself over the weekend, prompting more discussion of why so many have taken their own lives.

Tuesday, April 12, 2011 - 3:00am

La Salle University has suspended Jack Rappaport, a statistics professor at its business school, amid an investigation of allegations that he hired strippers to perform lap dances during an extra credit seminar he held on "the application of Platonic and Hegelian ethics to business," The Philadelphia Inquirer reported. Students paid $150 to attend the seminar, and the university is refunding the money. Rappaport could not be reached for comment. The incident was first reported by Philadelphia City Paper, which quoted students as saying that three dancers, wearing bikinis and high heels, performed lap dances on Rappaport and on some students. Two students who spoke anonymously to the Inquirer, however, said that while scantily clad dancers attended the class, they did not perform lap dances.

Tuesday, April 12, 2011 - 3:00am

The University of San Diego and the University of California at Riverside are caught up in what could be college sports' next big scandal. Federal law enforcement officials on Monday unsealed indictments of 10 people -- including former players at both universities and a former coach at San Diego -- alleging that they had engaged in a conspiracy to bribe players to fix college sports games. San Diego's president, Mary Lyons, said in a statement that "[t]hese are very serious allegations and the university is fully cooperating with the investigation."

Monday, April 11, 2011 - 3:00am

Leading Australian universities are creating new positions to recruit and retain indigenous students, The New York Times reported. Indigenous people make up 2.4 percent of the population but 1.25 percent of students entering universities, according to a recent study by the Center for the Study of Higher Education at the University of Melbourne.

Monday, April 11, 2011 - 3:00am

The U.S. Commission on Civil Rights refused on Friday to reconsider suspending its investigation into discrimination against women in university admissions, voting 4-3 against putting a motion on the agenda that would have reopened the inquiry. The commission voted by the same margin last month to suspend the study, which had subpoenaed data from 19 colleges within a 100-mile radius of Washington, D.C. The goal was to discover whether colleges relaxed standards for men, but not women, in order to achieve gender balance. Commissioners supporting the inquiry argued that a significant amount of data had already been collected and that abandoning the study would be a waste of resources. Its opponents, who last week argued against continuing with incomplete data, said that nothing had changed their minds.

Monday, April 11, 2011 - 3:00am

Conrad Volz, director of the University of Pittsburgh's Center for Healthy Environments and Communities, is leaving his position, saying that the university wants him to focus on teaching and research, and not to be an advocate in environmental debates, The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review reported. (He has been a critic of Marcellus shale drilling, and has drawn fire from its supporters.) University officials did not respond to a request for comment.

Monday, April 11, 2011 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Purchase College's Meagan Curtis discusses similarities in how emotion is conveyed through music and speech. Find out more about the Academic Minute here.

Monday, April 11, 2011 - 3:00am

The National Center for Education Statistics needs increased autonomy to better do its job, according to a report issued Sunday by the American Educational Research Association. The report also calls for flexibility for the Institute of Education Sciences to develop and carry out its research agenda.

Monday, April 11, 2011 - 3:00am

Accreditors yanked recognition of Compton Community College more than five years ago, effectively forcing it to shut down, but local residents are still pushing for it to be revived, the Los Angeles Times reported. El Camino Community College has been managing a center in Compton, but local residents complain that their low-income community should have its own college. A special trustee overseeing efforts in Compton has been pushing for change, while warning that it will take some time to win accreditation as a free-standing institution. She ousted the campus's chief executive, changed a number of procedures and said in a speech Friday that it was time for some faculty members to "do less-than-better somewhere else."

Monday, April 11, 2011 - 3:00am

Lawrence Summers may have had a controversial run as Harvard University's president, but now that he's back from service in the Obama administration, his lectures on campus are wildly popular with students, who come early to get a seat and stay late to ask questions, The Boston Globe reported. "I got a lot of satisfaction from being president but now I can focus on students in the way I wasn’t able to as president," he told the Globe. "I don’t think I’d enjoy being engaged in who was going to be hired and how the curriculum’s going to be reformed and the like at this stage. My life is much freer now."

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