Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

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Tuesday, October 12, 2010 - 3:00am

  • Geri Hockfield Malandra, founder and principal of Malandra Consulting LLC and former vice chancellor for strategic management at the University of Texas System, has been named provost at Kaplan University.
  • Scott Richland, president of Lunada Bay Investors, LLC, has been selected as chief investment officer at California Institute of Technology.
  • Jessica M. Rocheleau, visiting assistant professor at Misericordia University, in Pennsylvania, has been appointed as assistant professor of biology at Western New England College, in Massachusetts.
  • David Rosselli, associate athletic director for development-external relations at the University of California at Berkeley, has been chosen as assistant dean of development in the Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry at the University of the Pacific, also in California.
  • David E. Thomas, director of student and school support services at Victory Schools Inc., has been named dean of the division of adult and community education at Community College of Philadelphia.
  • Doug White, adjunct professor in the George H. Heyman Jr. Center for Philanthropy and Fundraising at the School of Continuing and Professional Studies at New York University, has been promoted to academic director of the center.
  • The appointments above are drawn from The Lists on Inside Higher Ed, which also includes a comprehensive catalog of upcoming events in higher education. To submit job changes or calendar items, please click here.

    Tuesday, October 12, 2010 - 3:00am

    The spreading controversy surrounding agents in big-time college sports claimed several more athletes Monday, as the National Collegiate Athletic Association permanently barred two University of North Carolina football players and the university itself dismissed a third from the team. The three players had all been found by a joint NCAA-UNC investigation not only to have taken improper benefits from sports agents (including jewelry and trips to the Bahamas and elsewhere) but also to have lied to investigators.

    Tuesday, October 12, 2010 - 3:00am

    A long-awaited report from the British government calls for removing most federal support for university degrees and providing large government-backed loans to students to replace those funds, The Telegraph reported. The report also calls for expanding university enrollments and increasing the quality of the institutions.

    Tuesday, October 12, 2010 - 3:00am

    Olympic College, a community college in Washington State, has instituted new limits on protests by non-students, and some of the rules are being questioned by civil liberties groups, The Kitsap Sun reported. Those who are not students and who want to protest will need to give the college advance notice, submit information about their plans, provide copies of materials to be distributed, and distribute materials only in the protest area. The rules follow a rally last year in which an anti-abortion group carried large photographs of aborted fetuses around campus.

    Tuesday, October 12, 2010 - 3:00am

    Fisk University, whose efforts to sell a major stake in its multimillion-dollar art collection have repeatedly been quashed by a state judge, has submitted a new plan that seeks to avoid the major objections that previously have been raised, The Tennessean reported. According to the newspaper's account, the Nashville university's latest proposal would have it sell $30 million of paintings by Georgia O'Keeffe and others but ensure that the buyer -- the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art -- cannot purchase the rest of the $73 million collection if Fisk's finances continue to deteriorate.

    Tuesday, October 12, 2010 - 3:00am

    Iran top leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, is moving against Islamic Azad University, the country's largest private university and a center of moderate thought, the Associated Press reported. The ayatollah issued a decree Monday declaring that the university's endowment was created illegally and thus has not validity. The endowment has been key to the university's independence from the government.

    Monday, October 11, 2010 - 3:00am

    The University of Connecticut acknowledged on Friday that its men's basketball team had violated National Collegiate Athletic Association rules through improper recruitment of players -- but continued to challenge an allegation by NCAA enforcement officials that its Hall of Fame coach, Jim Calhoun, had "failed to promote an atmosphere for compliance." The university's statements came as it formally responded to the NCAA's Notice of Allegations, which its officials received in May.

    Monday, October 11, 2010 - 3:00am

    Peace College, a women's college in North Carolina, has offered all full-time faculty members buyouts, The Raleigh News & Observer reported. Debra Townsley, president of the college, declined to say whether the buyout offers were budget-related. She said that the college is currently reviewing its academic programs, although it is not yet clear where that review will lead. "It's a changing market place," she told the News & Observer. "We have limited resources, and we want the flexibility to be able to implement some of these things."

    Monday, October 11, 2010 - 3:00am

    The University of Oregon has asserted that it has one of the few big-time athletic programs that are self-sufficient. But an article in The Oregonian revealed that about $8.5 million from the university's general funds has been used to pay for academic support for athletes over the last nine years. University officials said that they viewed that spending as appropriate, but the article noted that other universities that claim self-sufficiency pay for such academic support from athletic funds.

    Monday, October 11, 2010 - 3:00am

    Three professors were this morning named winners of the 2010 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics for their work on labor markets, and for their work explaining how societies can at the same time have large unemployed populations and many job vacancies. The winners are Peter A. Diamond of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Dale T. Mortensen of Northwestern University and Christopher A. Pissarides of the London School of Economics and Political Science.

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