Higher Education Quick Takes

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Monday, May 10, 2010 - 3:00am

The Yale University Art Gallery -- one of the larger and more comprehensive collections at an American college -- is starting a new program to share art for periods of a year or more with museums at six other colleges, which in turn will plan educational programs and exhibits. An announcement of the initiative -- which is supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation -- states that "while digital technologies have increased access to museum collections, there is no substitute for original works of art, which contain not only a particular magnetism, but also a wealth of information about history, human culture, and much more."

Following are the colleges and the focus of their art loans from Yale:

  • Bowdoin College, four early-modern European paintings and 30 early-modern American works.
  • Dartmouth College, 30 to 40 ancient Mediterranean objects.
  • Mount Holyoke College, 41 ancient Greek and Roman objects.
  • Oberlin College, 20-40 European Renaissance paintings and objects.
  • Smith College, 30 to 40 Asian works.
  • Williams College, 35-50 works of American, ancient Greek and Roman, Asian, African, European, and Islamic art.
Monday, May 10, 2010 - 3:00am

Debates have gone on for years between advocates of associate degree and bachelor's degree nursing. In the Philadelphia area, several major hospitals have in recent years announced that they will hire only those with bachelor's degrees, even if enough associate degree nurses are receiving the same registered nurse certification, The Philadelphia Inquirer reported. Given overall nursing shortages in the state, the move is leading to increased debate over whether it is appropriate to favor one group of nurses over another.

Monday, May 10, 2010 - 3:00am

Two Mexican universities -- the National Autonomous University of Mexico and the Autonomous University of San Luis Potosi -- have ended exchange programs with the University of Arizona, citing Arizona's new immigration law, The Arizona Republic reported. The new law authorizes increased police activity against anyone who could be seen as being in the United States illegally -- an approach critics believe will lead to widespread ethnic and racial profiling. Officials of the Mexican universities said they feared that their students might be harassed if they came to institutions in Arizona.

Monday, May 10, 2010 - 3:00am

The tragic murder of a women's lacrosse player at the University of Virginia, with a male lacrosse player charged in her death, has set off another round of articles and analysis about whether men's lacrosse players are somehow abusive or prone to violence. An article in The New York Times profiles the men's lacrosse team at the State University of New York College at Oneonta for a very different reason: tolerance and respect. The article explores the supportive reactions of team members when one of the co-captains came out as gay by writing an essay on the Web site Outsports. In the essay, Andrew McIntosh, the co-captain who came out, credits his head coach, Dan Mahar, for giving him courage to be honest. The coach stopped a practice when someone criticized a drill as being "so gay," and the coach said that -- whatever one thought of the drill -- that wasn't an appropriate way to criticize it.

Monday, May 10, 2010 - 3:00am

Alabama officials plan to appeal a judge's ruling last week that invalidated double dipping by state legislators who also work in the state's community college system, The Montgomery Advertiser reported. The widespread practice has been cited by many as creating conflicts of interest.

Friday, May 7, 2010 - 3:00am

A former professor at the University of Texas at Austin is pushing for the institution to change the name of Simkins Hall, which honors a former professor who was an organizer for the Ku Klux Klan, KXAN News reported. University officials say that they agree that William Stewart Simkins stood for some terrible ideas, but that it is not worth the time and money to rename every building that honors someone with terrible views that were once more accepted than they are today.

Friday, May 7, 2010 - 3:00am

The Peralta Community College District will pay $90,000 to two students who faced suspension for praying in class, The Contra Costa Times reported. The settlement also rescinds disciplinary letters placed in the students' files. College officials declined to comment, but the students said it was an important victory for their religious rights.

Friday, May 7, 2010 - 3:00am

The U.S. Justice Department's Antitrust Division is investigating National Collegiate Athletic Association scholarship rules. While the Justice Department has not commented on the case, an NCAA statement confirmed the inquiry and said that it focused on rules requiring athletic scholarships to be awarded a year at a time and with a five-year limit. The NCAA said that it is "is working with Justice to help it understand" the rationales for the rules. Advocates for athletes' rights have pushed for multiyear scholarships as one way to bolster financial security for college athletes.

Friday, May 7, 2010 - 3:00am

As students leave their housing of the last academic year, many colleges encourage recycling of the possessions they are discarding. But the University of Colorado at Boulder is cracking down on one form of recycling -- dumpster diving. The Daily Camera reported that the university has been concerned about non-students visiting dumpsters this time of year, The university has placed "no trespassing" signs by the dumpsters, making it possible to prosecute those who come from off-campus to look for usable materials there.

Friday, May 7, 2010 - 3:00am

While several academic organizations have announced that they will stay away from Arizona because of the state's new immigration law, the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association is going ahead with its scheduled annual meeting this month in Tucson. The association has issued statements condemning the new law -- which many believe will encourage ethnic and racial profiling -- but also has reminded members that the organization is based at the University of Arizona and that moving a meeting at the last minute can have many consequences.

"Many of our members have written to us in support of this position, while many others have urged us to cancel the meeting or change venues. We appreciate the range of opinions expressed regarding what it means to hold our meeting in Arizona at this moment," said the statement. "As such, we request your support of our commitment to make this meeting a site of sincere and serious coalition-building and collective action. This desire to act responsibly as an organization within the state drives our decision. However, members also should be aware that cancelling our meeting in Tucson or changing venues would have immediate and dire consequences for the Association that so many have worked so hard to build: near-certain bankruptcy, a probable lawsuit from the hotel with which we have a signed contract, and as a result, disbandment. We are also mindful that, while some NAISA members are financially and organizationally in a position to change or cancel their bookings for travel to Arizona, and are certainly at liberty to do so, many members are not in a position to make such changes so close to the meeting without incurring tremendous personal expense."

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