Higher Education Quick Takes

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Tuesday, March 26, 2013 - 4:23am

South Carolina's attorney general has ordered Richard Routh, a professor at the University of South Carolina Upstate, to stop seeking investors for his business, Invictus University, the Associated Press reported. A cease and desist order accused Routh of selling unregistered securities. But Routh says that the business doesn't exist and that the website for the university, which he took down, was partly for a class project.

 

Tuesday, March 26, 2013 - 3:00am

Regent's College in London has gained approval from British officials to become the second private nonprofit university in the United Kingdom, The Guardian reported. Regent's University London, as the institution will be known, will be the largest private institution in Britain, at 4,500 students. The University of Buckingham became the first private institution there, in 1983.

Tuesday, March 26, 2013 - 4:25am

The U.S. Education Department's Office for Civil Rights has announced that it found the South Carolina Technical College System and two of its colleges to be failing to comply with civil rights statutes requiring that websites be accessible to people with visual disabilities. The system and the colleges have agreed to make changes to come into compliance, and OCR said it would monitor progress on those changes.

 

Monday, March 25, 2013 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Ben Horton of the University of Pennsylvania reveals what we know about sea level change over the past two millennia. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.
 

Monday, March 25, 2013 - 3:00am

The University of Oxford has agreed to review policies under which its St. Hughes College has required applicants to demonstrate -- as a condition of admission -- that they can afford the living expenses, BBC reported. The agreement resolved a suit filed by an applicant who said he was rejected when he could not demonstrate that he had that money on hand. The applicant said that the rules were a human rights violation.

 

Monday, March 25, 2013 - 3:00am

The University of Maryland at College Park doesn't have a copy of the contract it signed to join the Big 10, The Washington Post reported. The Post filed an open records request for the contract, and was told that the university didn't have a copy. The Big 10, which is not subject to open records requests, keeps all such copies. Maryland officials said that not keeping a copy was in line with Big 10 policies, which are designed to reflect that most of its members are public universities, subject to open records requests.

Monday, March 25, 2013 - 3:00am

The president of Ryerson University, in Toronto, is condemning as "completely unacceptable" a tradition in which engineering students who wish to be leaders in the next year's orientation program go through a series of events, including crawling through slush while wearing only their underwear. Sheldon Levy, the president, said that "anyone who contends it is ‘just fun’ or ‘builds community’ has no place at Ryerson." Students told The Toronto Star that the president was overreacting, and that the event was fun and did build community. YouTube video of the event has drawn attention to it.

 

 

Monday, March 25, 2013 - 3:00am

An effort in Wisconsin to create standards for for-profit colleges has collapsed, The Wisconsin State Journal reported. The state panel had been considering rules that would have required for-profit colleges to show that 60 percent of students who started programs finished them and found jobs. But the panel working on the standards was disbanded, the newspaper reported, amid criticism from the for-profit colleges and some lawmakers.

 

Monday, March 25, 2013 - 3:00am

Academic Programs International has received a license from the U.S. Office of Foreign Assets Control to operate short- and long-term study abroad programs in Cuba, making it the first study abroad provider organization to announce that it had earned such approval. While regulations released back in 2011 cleared the way for U.S colleges to resume exchange programs in Cuba, the provider organizations were required to submit applications for "specific" licenses – applications that heretofore have gone unapproved. Those in the study abroad field who have been involved in discussions with U.S. government officials say they have been told to expect that other pending applications by study abroad providers will be acted upon shortly. 

"This is really an opening that will increase student participation going forward,” said Brian Whalen, president and CEO of the Forum on Education Abroad, which has been advocating on the providers’ behalf. Whalen noted that Forum data show that about 50 percent of colleges' study abroad programs are run in collaboration with providers.

“We’ll see more programs being developed, more universities being able to offer the experience to their students," he said.

Monday, March 25, 2013 - 3:00am

A student at Florida Atlantic University says that he was suspended from a course for refusing to engage in an activity he said was insulting to his faith. While the university has announced that the activity won't be repeated, it is contesting many details of the student's story.

The student says that as part of a class in intercultural communications, students were told to write the word Jesus on a piece of paper, fold it, and then to stamp on it, CBS4 News reported. The student, who is a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, said that when he refused, saying the exercise was insulting to his faith, he was suspended. The story was quickly picked up by conservative news and websites, with headlines such as "Professor Makes Students 'Stomp on Jesus.'"

The university released a statement in which it said that it could not comment on experiences of any one student, citing privacy laws. The university said that "no students were forced to take part in the exercise; the instructor told all of the students in the class that they could choose whether or not to participate." Further the university said that "no student has been expelled, suspended or disciplined by the university as a result of any activity that took place during this class."

Nonetheless, the university statement added: "This exercise will not be used again. The university holds dear its core values. We sincerely apologize for any offense this caused. Florida Atlantic University respects all religions and welcomes people of all faiths, backgrounds and beliefs."

 

 

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