Higher Education Quick Takes

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Thursday, February 2, 2012 - 3:00am

It's the cover-up that always gets you. The University of Nebraska at Lincoln is the latest college to face a bedbug problem in some dormitories -- an event that has been treated as a serious annoyance by students elsewhere, but hasn't led to scandals. As The Lincoln Journal Star reported, however, a resident assistant in one housing unit reported that when she found bedbugs, she was discouraged from telling the students, and was told to tell them that her room was being remodeled, not that it was being scrubbed for bedbugs. The university denies a cover-up, but students aren't convinced.

Thursday, February 2, 2012 - 3:00am

Pomona College dismissed 17 employees, 16 of them from the dining service, in December when they could not produce documents showing that they were legally in the United States, The New York Times reported. Some of the employees had worked for the college for many years, and their firings have angered many students and alumni. Critics argue that the colleges is failing to live up to its ideals. But college officials said that, under U.S. law, they had no choice but to act when they received a "credible complaint" that some of the employees were working illegally. That led to the request for documents, which in turn prompted the dismissals.

Thursday, February 2, 2012 - 3:00am

The arts and sciences faculty of Rutgers University at New Brunswick has voted 174 to 3 to call on the university to stop covering athletics department deficits and to let students vote on whether their fees should be used to do so, NewJersey.com reported. The vote follows a series of reports about the large deficits in the athletics program (nearly $27 million in 2010, making Rutgers one of the top money-losing universities in the country with regard to athletics). Faculty anger has been growing as the university has faced steep budget cuts. A Rutgers statement said that the university is working to bring down the deficit and that cuts would hurt Olympic sports that rely on student fees.

Thursday, February 2, 2012 - 3:00am

Indiana's Senate on Tuesday passed a bill that would let public schools teach creationism in science classes, as long as the views of multiple religions on the origins of the Earth are taught there as well, the Associated Press reported. Many scientists have spoken out against the bill, as have some scholars of religion.

Thursday, February 2, 2012 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Greg Crane of Tufts University explains the importance of Arabic translations of documents from ancient Greece. Find out more about the Academic minute here.

Thursday, February 2, 2012 - 4:26am

The State Department has banned one company from a summer program that brings foreign students to the United States and has signaled that the government will increase oversight of the program, The New York Times reported. The program is designed to give foreign university students the chance to spend a summer working in and learning about the United States, but reports have indicated that some companies use the program for cheap foreign labor.

Thursday, February 2, 2012 - 3:00am

The University of Connecticut's student-run television station has apologized for a video that jokes about the dangers of rape and sexual assault. The station posted an apology and promised to review standards. The video (viewable at Gawker) shows a woman fleeing a man she believes will attack her. She tries various emergency response phones and doesn't get the help she needs, but hears offensive comments from the computer-generated voice on the phones. UConn students took to Facebook to organize protests against the broadcast.

Thursday, February 2, 2012 - 3:00am

Shifting state policies related to developmental education threaten to limit innovation at colleges that serve large proportions of minority students, according to a new study from the Southern Education Foundation. For example, 14 states have prohibited or limited remedial courses, or reduced state funding for them at public four-year colleges. Those policies, half of which are on the books in Southern states, have a disproportional impact on minority-serving institutions, according to the study. The foundation called for leaders of minority-serving institutions to better collaborate to help students with developmental needs, and to "unabashedly demand more from state and federal governments and indeed the entire higher education community."

Wednesday, February 1, 2012 - 4:32am

Legislators in Florida and Georgia are having contentious debates this week about undocumented students and public higher education. In Georgia, lawmakers are debating legislation that would bar from public higher education all students who lack legal documentation to reside in the United States, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported. At a hearing Tuesday, many spoke out against the bill, and lawmakers suggested that they would consider some flexibility for colleges. Last year, the state higher education system toughened its rules on such students, saying that they could not enroll in any college that is turning away qualified applicants. The issue has attracted considerable attention despite the relatively small numbers of students involved. Of the state system's 318,000 students, about 300 are undocumented, down from 500 before rules were tightened.

In Florida on Tuesday, legislation to help such students (by granting them in-state tuition rates) died in a tie vote in committee, the Associated Press reported.

 

Wednesday, February 1, 2012 - 4:33am

Federal authorities have charged Craig Grimes, a former professor at Pennsylvania State University, with fraud, making false statements and money laundering associated with $3 million in federal grants, the Associated Press reported. The charges relate to grants from the National Institutes of Health and the Department of Energy. Grimes did not respond to requests for comment.

 

 

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