States and Systems Move Away From Testing in Admissions

Actions have been taken in California, Colorado, Illinois, Montana, New York, North Carolina and Washington State.

June 1, 2021
 
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In mid-May, the University of California agreed to stop using the SAT or ACT in admissions on any of its campuses. It did so to settle a lawsuit filed against the system.

It turns out that a series of public university systems and state governments were about to act on the SAT and ACT -- going test optional.

  • In Colorado, Governor Jared Polis, a Democrat, signed legislation to make all of the state's public colleges and universities test optional in admissions. The bill ended, permanently, a state requirement that all applicants submit ACT or SAT scores.
  • In New York, the City University of New York system suspended SAT and ACT requirements for the fall 2022 and spring 2023 admission cycles.
  • In Illinois, the General Assembly has sent to Governor J. B. Pritzker, a Democrat, legislation that would require all public colleges and universities in the state to be test optional in admissions.
  • In Montana, the board of the Montana University System voted to make SAT and ACT scores optional, permanently -- except ACT scores will be required for honors scholarships.
  • In North Carolina, the University of North Carolina system Board of Governors voted to extend a test-optional policy through next year.
  • In Washington State, all public colleges have gone test optional, permanently.

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