U.S. Programs Report Their Students in Nepal Are Safe

April 27, 2015

Four colleges and two study abroad programs that had students in Nepal as the devastating earthquake hit are all reporting that their students are safe.

Here are press reports on three colleges with students in Nepal: Liberty University, Muhlenberg College and Nebraska Christian College. Nine students and faculty members from Nebraska Christian College had just arrived in Nepal hours before the earthquake, and they too are safe. And Pitzer College issued a statement saying its students in Nepal are safe.

Where There Be Dragons, a study-abroad and gap year program based in Boulder, Colo., and that boasts of rugged outdoor components to its programs, also had students in Nepal. On Twitter, the program said that its students were safe. The Denver Post reported that the program has 25 students and 6 instructors in Nepal.

SIT, formerly the School for International Training, also has students in Nepal and reported that they are all safe. The students are scattered as they are currently in the independent-study portion of their program. An update from SIT noted that while some parents and colleges that have students there have urged the students to return to Katmandu, roads remain dangerous, so the program is following the advice of the U.S. Embassy and encouraging students to stay where they are for now.

For students from Nepal at American colleges and universities, the earthquake has caused anxiety about loved ones and their home country. Here are local press reports on how Nepalese students are gathering and trying to offer support at Mississippi University for Women, the University of Wisconsin at Madison and the University of Washington.

According to the Institute of International Education, Nepal is the 16th leading place of origin for international students coming to the United States. In 2013-14, there were 8,155 students from Nepal at American colleges and universities.

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