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Thursday, April 11, 2013 - 3:00am

The University of Arizona Faculty Senate has approved a broadening of the definition of research to explicitly state that faculty members being considered for tenure may receive credit for technology transfer, not just traditional forms of scholarship. The change comes at a time the university leaders have vowed to increase the institution's efforts to promote economic growth and to find new sources of funds. The new definition of research states: "The university values an inclusive view of scholarship in the recognition that knowledge is acquired and advanced through discovery, integration, application and teaching. Given this perspective, promotion and tenure reviews, as detailed in the criteria of individual departments and colleges, will recognize original research contributions in peer-reviewed publications as well as integrative and applied forms of scholarship that involve cross-cutting collaborations with business and community partners, including translational research, commercialization activities and patents."

 

Thursday, April 11, 2013 - 3:00am

Voice for Life, an anti-abortion student organization, has won official recognition from the Student Government Association at Johns Hopkins University, reversing an earlier decision that was criticized as punishing the group for its views, The Baltimore Sun reported. The group's planned activities are designed to discourage Hopkins women from having abortions, and to convince those training to become doctors not to perform abortions.

Thursday, April 11, 2013 - 3:00am

North Korea has been warning foreigners to leave South Korea. But early indications are that American students and those leading American programs in South Korea are monitoring developments, but not changing their plans. WKYT News covered a group of students from Eastern Kentucky University who are in South Korea and who reported nervous families at home, but no problems more serious than that. And The Times Beacon Record reported on how officials at the State University of New York at Buffalo, which recently opened a campus in South Korea, say that everything is continuing there, despite the threats from the north. By not leaving the country, the American students and academics are following the advice of the U.S. Embassy in Seoul, which is not recommending changes in travel plans to South Korea.

 

Wednesday, April 10, 2013 - 3:00am

Mendeley, a cloud-based PDF- and file-management tool popular with researchers, has been purchased by Elsevier, the information giant, the companies announced Monday. Mendeley is especially popular with scientists, but it competes with Zotero and Endnote, among others, in helping scholars organize their digital reference materials (it has also added analytics and collaborative tools). While officials of both companies heralded the possibilities of the partnership between the innovative startup and the massive publisher, critics took to Twitter and the blogosphere to express concerns that Mendeley would no longer pursue an open access mission.read a headline on paidcontent.org.

Wednesday, April 10, 2013 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Aron Barbey of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign explains efforts to determine if emotional intelligence has a specific location in the brain. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

Wednesday, April 10, 2013 - 3:00am

The job market for communication faculty members may be better now than it was before the economic downturn that started in 2008. The National Communication Association on Tuesday released data showing that it had listed 661 positions in its publications during 2012. That's up from 534 in 2011, 438 in 2010, and 351 in 2009. In 2008 (when most postings came before the economic downturn started in the fall), there were 597 listings. Not all communication positions are listed with the association, but the rise and fall of the organization's listings tends to reflect the job market generally.

 

Wednesday, April 10, 2013 - 3:00am

Seven full-time faculty members -- most of them off the tenure track but including one tenured professor -- have received layoff notices, The Bangor Daily News reported. Faculty union leaders said that the university is eliminating jobs as a tactic in contract negotiations, which have been going on without progress since a contract expired in 2011. The university's spokesman said that the layoffs were needed for budgetary reasons.

Wednesday, April 10, 2013 - 3:00am

Fifteen people were stabbed by a studentat Lone Star College's CyFair campus Tuesday, The Houston Chronicle reported. The college closed the campus for the day after the late morning stabbings. The seriousness of the injuries varied, and some of those attacked are hospitalized.

Authorities told CNN that the student admitted to having fantasies of killing people and of having planned the attack.

 

Wednesday, April 10, 2013 - 3:00am

The European University Association released results of a survey on the internationalization of European universities in advance of its annual conference in Belgium. Respondents ranked “attracting students from abroad” as their top priority, followed by “internationalization of learning and teaching,” “providing our students with more opportunities to have a learning experience abroad,” and “strategic research partnerships.”

The survey also asked about universities’ interest in massive open online courses, or MOOCs, and found that only 58 percent of respondents had heard about MOOCs and 33 percent said they had been discussed at their institutions. When asked whether European universities should further develop MOOCs, 44 percent of respondents said yes, and another 48 percent had no clear opinion.

The survey garnered 180 responses from 175 higher education institutions in 38 countries.

Wednesday, April 10, 2013 - 3:00am

About 60 students and faculty members at Florida Atlantic University held a rally Tuesday to criticize the university for its handling of a complaint about an intercultural communications class in which the instructor, Deandre Poole, had students write "Jesus" on a piece of paper and asked them to step on it, The Palm Beach Post reported. Poole has been placed on leave, with the university citing threats against him. The university also said it would never permit the "Jesus" exercise to be done again -- even though many professors said that it is legitimate and has been unfairly portrayed. Those at the protest said that the university''s response endangered academic freedom by saying that the university would not back professors whose class statements or lessons offend anyone. The university issued a statement Tuesday saying that it "embraces open discourse across its campuses and values its public mission as a venue for free expression…. We will to work with the FAU faculty and staff to address sensitive and controversial subjects, while upholding freedom of expression. A university campus is the best place for discussions of differing opinions."

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