Higher Education Quick Takes

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Thursday, March 14, 2013 - 3:00am

The College of the Atlantic announced this week that its board voted to sell all fossil-fuel-related investments. The move follows a student push -- at that college and elsewhere -- to sell investments in companies whose businesses they believe are harmful to the environment. A spokeswoman for the college said that the total endowment is about $30 million and that the value of investments sold to comply with the policy was just under $1 million.

 

Thursday, March 14, 2013 - 4:25am

New research at York University in Canada both confirms and extends the concerns of many faculty members about laptop use in class. The research found that undergraduates who multitask on laptops comprehend less of what has been covered in a lecture than do other students. That part is unlikely to surprise most professors. But the study also examined students who were taking notes -- with some students sitting next to those who were multitasking on their laptops. Those next to a laptop multitasker also saw drops in what they picked up from the lecture. The findings have been published in the journal Computers & Education.

Thursday, March 14, 2013 - 4:28am

Officials in New York State have drafted plans to spin off the College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering from the State University of New York at Albany, The Albany Times Union reported. The plan would make the nanoscale college its own specialized college, much like SUNY's College of Environmental Science and Forestry. The nanoscale college has been a major research success for SUNY, attracting considerable industry support. State and SUNY officials declined to comment on the plan, which would require several levels of approval.

 

 

Wednesday, March 13, 2013 - 4:33am

The University of Tokyo is planning to replace its admissions exam within five years, The Japan Times reported. In its place a new system will be created, based in large part on interviews and on recommendations from the high schools of applicants.

 

Wednesday, March 13, 2013 - 3:00am

More than 100 protesters marched to the Higher Education Ministry in Sri Lanka on Tuesday calling for an increase in the number of public universities, Xinhua reportedThe news service reported that more than 144,000 students pass the university entrance each year, but there are only spots for 22,000.

Wednesday, March 13, 2013 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Rebecca Fisher of the University of Arizona explains how a species of lizard is able to regenerate their self-amputated tails. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.


 

Wednesday, March 13, 2013 - 3:00am

The cost of tuition and living for international students in Australia has increased 166 percent since 2002, The Australian reportedAn analysis by the Boston Consulting Group estimates total annual costs for the average international student in Australia as being $44,000, compared to $37,000 for international students in the U.S. and $30,000 for those studying in England. The article cites exchange rates as one critical factor in the increase.

Wednesday, March 13, 2013 - 3:00am

A Mississippi man has been charged with two counts of felony cyberstalking over threats posted on Facebook against Carolyn Meyers, the president of Jackson State University, The Clarion Ledger reported. The man, currently held in jail, is not a student at the university.

Wednesday, March 13, 2013 - 3:00am

The University of Pennsylvania on Tuesday announced new rules to protect the privacy of those who apply to enroll there. The rules stress the importance of privacy, and of sharing information about applicants only for specific, professionally related reasons. Just a few weeks ago, the university was embarrassed by reports that a former admissions officer had been mocking applicants on Facebook. But a university spokesman said via e-mail that the admissions privacy rules had been in the works for months and "were not in any way a response" to the behavior of the former admissions officer.

 

 

Wednesday, March 13, 2013 - 4:31am

Faculty members, students and parents are criticizing Arcadia University's board for firing President Carl Oxholm III on Friday, and providing no explanation for the decision, The Philadelphia Inquirer reported. Oxholm had been in office for less than two years, but was getting good reviews on the campus. A university statement issued Tuesday afternoon -- after word of the firing leaked, gave no indication of the reason for the change. Oxholm issued a statement in which he said he was "surprised and disappointed," and that he was sad he had been unable to say farewell to students. Of his dismissal, he said: "It was without cause, and those who conveyed the decision to me declined to give me any reason or explanation for the decision or the speed of its implementation."

 

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