Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

Subscribe to Inside Higher Ed | Quick Takes
Wednesday, July 27, 2011 - 3:00am

Washburn University has agreed to pay $210,000 to settle a lawsuit filed last year by two former senior administrators, who charged that the institution's president had fired them because they had cooperated with a review of his performance by board members. Wanda Hill and Robin Bowen, formerly vice presidents for administration and for academic affairs, respectively, at Washburn, sued the Kansas public institution a few months after they were fired last spring. They alleged that President Jerry B. Farley had dismissed them because he considered them disloyal for having shared information with board members about issues related to controversial spending and other topics. Farley declined to discuss the situation with Inside Higher Ed at the time, but told The Topeka Capital-Journal that he disputed the allegations. In a settlement agreement, published by the local newspaper on Monday, Washburn will pay $130,000 to Bowen and $82,500 to Hill (and to their lawyers), and Farley will write a general letter of recommendation for both women. Washburn admits no wrongdoing in the agreement. Hill is now vice president for finance and CFO at Sierra Nevada College; Bowen is vice president for academic affairs at Fitchburg State University.

Tuesday, July 26, 2011 - 3:00am

Chicago State University officials have been boasting about improvements in retention rates. But an investigation by The Chicago Tribune found that part of the reason is that students with grade-point averages below 1.8 have been permitted to stay on as students, in violation of university rules. Chicago State officials say that they have now stopped the practice, which the Tribune exposed by requesting the G.P.A.'s of a cohort of students. Some of the students tracked had G.P.A.'s of 0.0.

Tuesday, July 26, 2011 - 3:00am

Leading business schools are starting to convert their case studies -- at many institutions the central feature of M.B.A. education -- to tablet form, Bloomberg BusinessWeek reported. The change is significant because the new format allows students to immediately see the consequences of various decisions and for the case studies to become much more flexible and interactive.

Tuesday, July 26, 2011 - 3:00am

A study being published today in the American Sociological Review finds that young adults who were brought to the United States as immigrants without the legal authority to reside in the country do pursue an education, but rarely are able to use that education to get good jobs. The study found that one of the first times many of these young adults felt the impact of their immigration status was when they applied to college -- and realized that they could not seek financial aid. Just about half of those studied tried for some college education. But without the legal right to work in the United States, very few reported the kind of economic advancement associated with higher education. The study was conducted by Roberto G. Gonzales, an assistant professor at the University of Chicago’s School of Social Service Administration.

Tuesday, July 26, 2011 - 3:00am

Analysis of the manifesto left by Anders Behring Breivik, who has admitted

Tuesday, July 26, 2011 - 3:00am

Federal officials have launched a process for a major overhaul of rules governing the protections assured to people who are the subject of research studies, The New York Times reported. The revisions are intended to reflect changes in the research being done and to reduce red tape. Many researchers have historically complained about the cumbersome process for having their projects approved, but some critics have said that more scrutiny is needed of studies involving humans.

Tuesday, July 26, 2011 - 3:00am

Federal officials have undertaken a process for a major overhaul of rules governing the protections assured to people who are the subject of research studies, The New York Times reported. The revisions are intended to reflect changes in the research being done and to reduce red tape. Many researchers have historically complained about the cumbersome process for having their projects approved, but some critics have said that more scrutiny is needed of studies involving humans.

Tuesday, July 26, 2011 - 3:00am

California's governor signed legislation on Monday that will let immigrants without legal documentation receive privately funded scholarships to enroll in the state's public colleges, the Los Angeles Times reported. But in discussing the measure, Gov. Jerry Brown declined to commit to signing companion legislation that would let undocumented students get state-financed student aid, saying he viewed it "favorably" but did not want to get out ahead of events, since the bill has not yet reached his desk.

Tuesday, July 26, 2011 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Seth Chandler of the University of Houston examines how
computer technology is poised to change how legislation is written and applied. Find out more about the Academic Minute here.

Monday, July 25, 2011 - 3:00am

Kaplan Inc. has agreed to pay $1.6 million to settle a whistle-blower's suit charging that the company's CHI Institute, in Pennsylvania, enrolled students in a surgical technology program without having enough clinical placements for the students to graduate, The New York Times reported. About $500,000 in the settlement will repay student loans of those enrolled in the program. Kaplan did not admit any wrongdoing.

Pages

Search for Jobs

Back to Top