More Blackface Incidents Involving Students

October 3, 2016

In an academic year that has already seen numerous racist incidents, three more institutions are dealing with blackface images posted to social media by students.

Albright College's president, Lex O. McMillan III, posted this statement to Facebook: "The two students most directly involved in the creation and distribution of the video that was widely shared on social media have been suspended pending further investigation and adjudication through the college’s community standards process. They have been advised to leave campus immediately and remain available for communications with college officials. As we continue to investigate the matter, we have learned that multiple students of multiple races were involved. We will continue to review the facts of the matter so that the most appropriate sanctions for those who took part can be determined."

The Reading Eagle reported that the video in question features a female student putting on blackface makeup, calling herself "Carlisha," making "disparaging remarks" about the Black Lives Matter movement and placing padding in her pants to suggest a large behind.

Prairie View A&M University, a historically black institution, is also investigating a blackface incident. In this case, a female soccer player covered her face with black tape and posted the image to social media with the caption, "When you just tryna fit in at your HBCU." The athlete's father told KTRK News that his daughter did not mean to cause offense. "She's not racist. We're not racist. We're Mexican," he said. "It's a bad thing and it's been blown way out of proportion. She's not like that."

Columbia College, in South Carolina, is investigating social media images that appear to show three students in blackface, The State reported. The college has announced that the students involved will not be allowed on campus until an investigation is completed.

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