Higher Education Quick Takes

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Wednesday, October 24, 2012 - 3:00am

The number of first-year students at the nation's 141 medical schools rose by 1.5 percent this fall, about half the size of the increase from fall 2010 to fall 2011, the Association of American Medical Colleges reported Tuesday. The number of applicants to allopathic medical schools grew by 3.1 percent, to 45,266, while the number of first-time applicants increased by 3.4 percent. Of the 19,517 new students enrolled this fall, 4 percent (771 students) are at the 11 new medical schools that admitted their inaugural class between 2007 and 2012. Medical educators have been pushing for increases in enrollments, citing projected physician shortages in the years ahead, especially in general medical fields.

Wednesday, October 24, 2012 - 3:00am

A former employee at Thomas Jefferson School of Law alleges she falsified data on graduate employment at the request of the school’s administration, according to court documents published by Law School Transparency. In a sworn statement filed as part of a lawsuit against the school for supposedly misrepresenting its job placement rates, former career services assistant director Karen Grant says she was told to record students as “employed” if they had held a job at any point after graduating; American Bar Association and standards hold that graduates can only be counted as “employed” if they have a job as of Feb. 15 following graduation.

Thomas Jefferson Dean Rudy Hasl maintains that there is no truth to Grant’s claims, and says the school will present a “vigorous denial of the allegations” to the court. He notes that Grant worked at the school for less than a year, and suggested that her departure was not voluntary, and thus “she may have other reasons for making these assertions.” Thomas Jefferson will present its case at a hearing Nov. 9 in response to a motion filed by the plaintiff in the lawsuit seeking sanctions against Thomas Jefferson for allegedly destroying and concealing evidence.

Wednesday, October 24, 2012 - 3:00am

Potomac College will reimburse students for courses they take from StraighterLine, an online provider that offers 42 entry-level courses, according to a StraighterLine announcement. The for-profit college will pay students for the $999 fee for up to 10 StraighterLine courses, the equivalent of a full year of college, after students transfer the courses to Potomac and then successfully complete a semester there. StraighterLine's courses are not credit-bearing, but come with a credit recommendation from the American Council on Education.

Wednesday, October 24, 2012 - 3:00am

At the University of Kentucky, employee contributions of 5 percent of salary to their retirement funds are matched by a 10 percent institutional contribution. For administrators, however, 15 percent of salary is provided by the university straight to the retirement fund. Faculty members, who have been sparring with the administration over budget cuts, suggested that the university eliminate the special benefit for administrators, but the university has declined, The Lexington Herald-Leader reported. The university did agree not to offer the benefit to any more administrators, but said it would be unfair to take it away from those already receiving the extra contributions to their retirement funds.

 

Wednesday, October 24, 2012 - 4:18am

One year after college graduation, women are paid 82 cents for every dollar earned by their male peers, according to a report from the American Association of University Women. The gap is evident even when comparing women and men who work in the same field, and had the same college majors. The report also found that found that 20 percent of women working full time one year after graduation must spend more than 15 percent of earnings on paying back student loans.

Tuesday, October 23, 2012 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Amy Sliva of Northeastern University explains how advances in computing power are allowing for an artificially intelligent approach to cyber security. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

 

Tuesday, October 23, 2012 - 3:00am

Louisiana State University on Monday apologized for its recent action to remove crosses from a photograph of a group of LSU football fans who paint their bodies in various ways, including the placement of crosses above their hearts. The university used Photoshop to remove the crosses from a photo of the Painted Posse before using the photograph in a newsletter. (This article on WGNO's website includes the actual photograph and a version in which the crosses were removed.) Facing growing criticism, the university posted this statement on its Facebook page: "LSU sent out a promotional message on October 15 to its sports fans asking for feedback on their experience at the LSU-South Carolina game on October 13. In messages to sports fans we attempt to convey no religious or political messaging. We did not intend to offend anyone by the editing of this photograph and in the future we will use another photo rather than make a similar edit. We erred in our judgment and we have communicated our apologies to the group of young men represented in the photo whose school spirit is second to none."

 

Tuesday, October 23, 2012 - 3:00am

Both male and female scientists believe that gender discrimination is one reason why some women avoid careers in science, and why some who opt for science careers pursue biology as opposed to physics, according to a new report published in the journal Gender and Society. The authors say that they want to understand why women are making certain choices, and how those choices are perceived. In interviews, male scientists tended to refer to past discrimination as a factor while women were more likely to cite current discrimination as a factor.

 

Tuesday, October 23, 2012 - 4:18am

"College 101" courses -- in which students learn how to be effective students -- have strong campus support, but need to improve if they are to have a long-term positive impact on students, says a new report by the Community College Research Center of Teachers College of Columbia University. While the information the courses provide is "valuable," the courses typically "did not offer sufficient opportunities for in-depth exploration and skill-building practice," the report says. The analysis was based on an investigation of the courses at three community colleges in Virginia.

 

 

Tuesday, October 23, 2012 - 3:00am

A federal judge has rejected a lawsuit by Hebrew University of Jerusalem against GM for the auto company's use of an Albert Einstein image pasted onto a muscled physique, The Detroit News reported. Hebrew University said that Einstein's will gave it rights to the use of his image. In this case GM used the image in an ad that ran in People magazine with the tag line "Ideas are sexy too." Judge Howard Matz ruled that GM was within its rights. "[Einstein] did become the symbol and embodiment of genius. His persona has become thoroughly ingrained in our cultural heritage. Now, nearly 60 years after his death, that persona should be freely available to those who seek to appropriate it as part of their own expression, even in tasteless ads," he ruled.

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