Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

Subscribe to Inside Higher Ed | Quick Takes
Monday, December 12, 2011 - 3:00am

Hillary Rodham Clinton, the secretary of state, on Saturday kicked off a new effort to help women in Muslim nations study science at women's colleges in the United States. Through the program, the New York Academy of Sciences will provide the women with mentors, and participating women's colleges will provide financial assistance. "Today’s next Madame Curie could be sitting in a high school classroom in Cairo, Jakarta, or Mogadishu, yearning for opportunities to explore her potential. The United States is determined to help give her that chance," said Clinton, in announcing the new effort.

 

Monday, December 12, 2011 - 3:00am

Paul Greenfield is resigning in January as vice chancellor (the presidential equivalent) at the University of Queensland amid an admissions scandal at the Australian university, The Australian reported. Details remain vague, but someone described as a "close relative" of Greenfield was admitted to a medical program under an admissions procedure that should not have applied to the student.

 

Monday, December 12, 2011 - 3:00am

The University of Cincinnati and Xavier University each suspended multiple men's basketball players Sunday in the wake of a wild brawl Saturday that left some participants -- and their sport -- with a black eye. The annual game between the two Cincinnati-based rivals (known as the Crosstown Shootout) ended prematurely because of the fight, in which players threw and landed brutal punches. Players and coaches also drew criticism for post-game comments in which some of them appeared to justify their actions. "We're grown men over here," a Xavier player, Tu Holloway, said in a post-game interview with reporters. "We got a whole bunch of gangsters in the locker room. Not thugs, but tough guys on the court."

 

Monday, December 12, 2011 - 3:00am

The successful lobbying campaign by for-profit higher education to scale back the Obama administration's "gainful employment" regulations is no secret, but an article Saturday in The New York Times provided an in-depth look at the effort:

  • For-profit colleges and associations spent more than $16 million on lobbying, with much of the money going to Democrats with ties to the White House.
  • The biggest spender in the lobbying effort was The Washington Post Company, owner of Kaplan University ($1.71 million), followed by the Coalition for Educational Success ($1.65 million), Career Education Corporation ($1.60 million), the Association of Private Sector Colleges and Universities ($1.45 million), and the Apollo Group ($1.43 million).
Monday, December 12, 2011 - 3:00am

The Internal Revenue Service has denied tax-exempt status to an unnamed foundation that provides scholarships to students who seek to enroll in college credit study programs. The foundation's board of directors own a separate online education company that provides test-preparation materials. As a result, the IRS determined that the scholarship fund operates in the interests of the for-profit company.

Friday, December 9, 2011 - 3:00am

The YU Beacon, an online student publication at Yeshiva University, has lost its university funding in the wake of a controversy over a first-person sex article by an anonymous student at the Stern College for Women, the undergraduate women's division at Yeshiva. The article, "How Do I Even Begin to Explain This," is an account of "[p]eeling off my Stern-girl exterior" and meeting a man (who normally wears a yarmulke) for sex at a hotel. The essay is tame by the standards of college newspaper sex columns, but was a shock at Yeshiva. Many of the student comments are negative. One such comment: "That story was extremely disturbing, and it too exemplified ideas that are completely contrary to the Torah. The reason this article has generated more controversy is simply because pseudoerotica has more fans than murder descriptions." Others were more sympathetic, with one student writing that "I thought this article had a lot of merit because it touched on a serious issue that exists in the modern orthodox community in general and the YU/Stern community in particular: the schism between what our educators view as reality and the reality that exists for our generation."

The home page of the Beacon announces that, in the wake of the article, "YU and The Beacon have agreed to separate." Fox News quoted a Yeshiva spokesman as saying that the student government, and not the university, made the decision to cut off funds.

Friday, December 9, 2011 - 3:00am

The board of Florida A&M University voted Thursday to reprimand James Ammons, the president, in the wake of the hazing death of a student in the institution's marching band, the Associated Press reported. Board members also complained that Ammons had not kept them informed or dealt with the accreditation problems facing some academic programs. When the AP asked Ammons after the meeting if he had "dodged a bullet," he said "I heard the bullet loudly and clearly."

 

Friday, December 9, 2011 - 3:00am

Virginia Tech, where the tragedy of shooting deaths is known too well, again experienced that trauma on Thursday afternoon. Students and others were encouraged to stay wherever they were -- with activities called off -- after a police officer was shot at a routine traffic stop. Reports followed of another dead body and of a search for the killer. By the end of the afternoon, news reports said that the second body was the shooter, and the university said that normal activities could resume. Final exams that had been scheduled for today have been postponed for a day.

Late Thursday, Virginia Tech identified the police officer who was killed: Deriek W. Crouse, 39, who with his wife was raising five children and step-children. He was an Army veteran who had worked for the university since 2007.

 

Friday, December 9, 2011 - 3:00am

An article in Science explores how some Saudi universities are building their research reputations in nontraditional ways. King Abdulaziz University has hired more than 60 top researchers in the sciences, at nice salaries for part-time work, if they agree to list the university with their other institutions in identification lines in journal articles. The idea is that rankings of citations will show a sharp increase for the university. King Saud University is working to recruit researchers to affiliate in loose ways so that their discoveries will be linked to the university. Some academics quoted in the article said that they feared such efforts would detract from the real advances being made by Saudi universities.

Friday, December 9, 2011 - 3:00am

Larry Sager has been scheduled to step down of the law school of the University of Texas at Austin at the end of this academic year. But The Austin American-Statesman reported that he was forced to resign Thursday, following complaints from faculty members about the allocation of funds. The disagreements centered on the use of funds from the law school's foundation.

Pages

Search for Jobs

Back to Top