Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

June 3, 2013

Ivy Tech Community College -- a well-regarded statewide network in Indiana -- is considering closing up to 20 of its 72 campus locations, The Indianapolis Star reported. The system is facing a $68 million deficit, the result of several years in which enrollment increased substantially without the colleges' receiving per-student appropriations sufficient to keep up with the growth.

 

June 3, 2013

In today’s Academic Minute, Dale Durran of the University of Washington explains why it’s more difficult to keep your drink cold on a humid day. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

June 3, 2013

Study abroad officials are carefully tracking events in Turkey, where large protests in Istanbul and elsewhere have led to clashes with police. Syracuse University has 20 students in Istanbul, about to finish up a semester program. Margaret Himley, associate provost for international education and engagement, said via e-mail that students are scheduled to leave Sunday and "we are carefully monitoring the situation and talking with students about what these demonstrations mean and about what precautions they should be taking." A number of other institutions have summer programs about to start in Turkey. Jim Butterfield, a professor of political science at Western Michigan University, said that he is scheduled to accompany five students to Istanbul in three weeks. He said that "we're monitoring developments." Julie Anne Friend, associate director for international safety and security at Northwestern University, which will be sending students to Turkey for a program that starts July 1, said via e-mail that "we are not considering suspension at this time, but will, of course continue to monitor the situation."

June 3, 2013

The faculty union at the University of Hawaii System on Friday issued a letter denouncing the National Education Association, with which it was until recently affiliated. The letter -- "To NEA: Thank you for trying to destroy our union" -- says that since the leaders of the University of Hawaii Professional Assembly voted to end its affiliation with the NEA, the national union has "bombarded" the local union with visits, seeking to cast doubt on the decision. The Hawaii union also says that the NEA has been threatening to encourage a "decertification" vote, which would end the local union's collective bargaining rights.

The letter is unusually critical for a public statement by one union against another. "We realize you need our $686,649 in annual dues because your membership is dropping. NEA has been reorganizing and laying off staff. Your clout must be slipping. President Obama sent Joe Biden, his Vice President, to your annual meeting last year.  I guess if you want to see Obama, you’ll have to come out here to Hawaii and wait in line with him for shave ice (it’s a local thing). With a strong six-year contract in place, we tend to forget that UHPA leaders negotiated the contract without NEA help, and that 89 percent of our members stood up to the university administration when it thought we would cave in to a weak offer."

A statement from the NEA states that it wants to see all members of the Hawaii union vote on disaffiliation, rather than just leaders of the union. The statement says that many University of Hawaii faculty members want to remain affiliated with the NEA, but haven't had an opportunity to participate in the decision about affiliation. A spokesman for the NEA denied that there is any effort to decertify the local union.

On Saturday, the board of the Hawaii union voted to sustain its earlier decision and to end the NEA affiliation.

June 3, 2013

New data on an early MOOC course offered by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology are being released today in the journal Research and Practice in Assessment. The data are about the course Circuits and Electronics, which already has been the subject of some analysis. In an article in the journal, researchers reported on the use of course resources by those who earned certificates (greatest use on weekends, when students presumably had more time and just before assignments were due), the use of discussion boards (most students were lurkers, and viewed others comments without adding any of their own), and the countries of origin of students, based on IP addresses and perhaps not completely accurate as a result (greatest enrollments from the United States, followed by India, Britain, Colombia and Spain).

June 3, 2013

Canadian universities have been seeing steady growth in international enrollments, but only minimal interest from Americans, many of whom could potentially save a lot of money and (for those in some Northern states) enroll at institutions very close to home. An article in The Globe and Mail describes new efforts by some Canadian universities seeking to attract more American students. Special scholarships and increased marketing efforts are being tried by several universities.

June 3, 2013

Saint Paul's College, a historically black institution in Virginia founded in 1888, will close at the end of this month. While college officials did not respond to reports over the weekend of an imminent closure, the Associated Press reported that the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools confirmed that it had been formally notified by the college of plans to close. The college has been in danger of closure since SACS announced a year ago that it was stripping the college of accreditation, making its students ineligible for federal aid. There had been some hope that the college would be rescued by merging with Saint Augustine's College, a historically black college in North Carolina. Both institutions were Both founded by the Episcopal Church. But last month, Saint Augustine's announced that it did not consider that plan viable.

 

June 3, 2013

Tenure-track faculty members at the City University of New York have voted overwhelmingly that they have no confidence in Pathways, a controversial curricular shift in the CUNY system designed to make it easier for students at its community colleges to transfer to four-year colleges and in two additional years earn bachelor's degrees. More than 60 percent of eligible voters participated in the no confidence vote, and 92 percent of those voted no confidence. While the goal of smooth transfer from community colleges to four-year colleges is one that is generally endorsed by faculty members and administrators alike, many professors have spoken out against the way this is being done. Some have complained about specific changes in requirements, while others have questioned whether too much control of curricular matters has shifted away from department and college faculties. "It should be clear now, if it was not before, that CUNY should not move forward with Pathways. A 92 percent vote of no confidence is a mandate for change," said a statement issued Saturday by Barbara Bowen, president of the Professional Staff Congress, the faculty union, which organized the vote.

CUNY officials have defended Pathways as a needed reform to help more students earn bachelor's degrees. The system maintains a webpage with information about the program here.

While a number of adjunct leaders at CUNY have spoken out against Pathways, some have also criticized the vote of no confidence for excluding their participation.

 

 

June 3, 2013

The University of Chicago and the Marine Biological Laboratory, in Woods Hole, Mass., are moving toward a partnership that would involve substantial collaboration but keep the laboratory a freestanding institution. The laboratory's corporation -- largely made up of scientists who currently or formerly used the facilities there -- voted to endorse the move this weekend, and that sets the stage for negotiations over a formal agreement between the boards of the two institutions. The laboratory has been looking for an affiliation that might give it a more stable financial basis, and the University of Chicago has a history of working with laboratories (such as Argonne National Laboratory) that are closely affiliated but not owned by the university. Currently much of the activity at the laboratory takes place in the summer and one possibility for a collaboration is more support that would allow for a full program of teaching and research year-round.

June 3, 2013

American Commercial Colleges, a for-profit higher education business in Texas, has agreed to pay the federal government up to $2.5 million to settle claims that it falsely certified that it was in compliance with certain requirements to receive federal student aid. A statement on the settlement from the Justice Department said that American Commercial Colleges had "orchestrated certain short-term private student loans" that the college repaid in order to appear to comply with the "90/10" rule. That rule requires that colleges seeking to participate in federal student aid programs receive at least 10 percent of their revenues from sources other than federal student aid. H. Grady Terrill, a lawyer for American Commercial Colleges, told The Lubbock Avalanche-Journal that he anticipated the institutions soon reapplying for authority to operate.

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