Higher Education Quick Takes

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Monday, June 27, 2011 - 3:00am

Preppies (of the male variety) can now buy their blazers and their college polo shirts in one shopping trip. Brooks Brothers has announced that, for the first time in its nearly 200-year history, it will sell college apparel, Bloomberg reported. Clothing will be available only from 15 colleges, and this won't be the place to buy college logo boxers. Only sweaters, dress and polo shirts and ties will be sold. "The key for us is re-establishing our connection with what we call the college community -- students, faculty and alumni," Karl Haller, vice president of strategy and business development for Brooks Brothers told Bloomberg. "We have a pretty well-educated customer and there’s a built-in opportunity with alumni who are already our customer base." The 15 colleges: Boston College; the U.S. Naval Academy, Auburn, Cornell, Havard, New York, Ohio State, Princeton, Stanford, and Vanderbilt Universities and the Universities of Alabama, Georgia, Notre Dame and Virginia.

Friday, June 24, 2011 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Edward Wasserman of Washington and Lee University discusses whypoverty and the poor are often inaccurately portrayed in the media. Find out more about the Academic Minute here.

Friday, June 24, 2011 - 3:00am

A horrific attack on a University of British Columbia graduate student, home visiting her family in Bangladesh, has led to renewed discussion at the university of defending the right of women to an education. The Globe and Mail reported that the husband of Rumana Monzur, a graduate student in political science at British Columbia and an assistant professor at Dhaka University, has been charged with gouging out her eyes, leaving her blind. While Monzur was planning to return to Vancouver to defend her thesis, her husband reportedly opposed the idea of her leaving the country.

Stephen J. Toope, president at British Columbia, sent a letter to students and faculty members in which he said: "This tragic occasion is a poignant marker of the need to work to protect the fundamental human right of all women to pursue education. The allegations that her commitment to her studies was a factor in the attack are of grave concern."

Friday, June 24, 2011 - 3:00am

The nation’s historically black colleges and universities need to assume a far more active role in the national push to get more students to complete their degrees, a group of HBCU presidents said Thursday.

"We need to be much more aggressive in taking the lead in setting the agenda," said Walter Kimbrough, president of Philander Smith College in Little Rock, at a press conference in Atlanta that took place during a seminar organized by the Southern Education Foundation. "We are going to have to make a break from some of our historical ideology and looking at ourselves in a defensive posture."

Greater participation of HBCU's in the larger public debate will become only more urgent, many speakers noted, because of the shifting demographics of the student body. Kimbrough cited preliminary 2010 U.S. Census data showing that the majority of babies born in the U.S. over the past two years were not white. "By 2019 there’s not going to be one racial majority in this country," said Kimbrough. And, several speakers said, with nearly one in five black college students attending HBCU's, these institutions have a lot to contribute to conversations about how these students can succeed in higher education.

But, even as HBCU's need to increase their expectations of students and welcome the push for accountability, several speakers lamented the funding environment. "You have these two trains running," said David Wilson, president of Morgan State University in Baltimore. "You have the college completion goal, and we’re not investing in the students we need to achieve that goal."

That trend is holding true in higher education more broadly, said Carlton Brown, president of Clark Atlanta University. "We want to regain a position from which we have fallen, but we haven’t addressed how we got there in the first place," said Brown, who added that a college education had been slowly redefined over time as an individual benefit rather than a broader societal one. "When you redefine it to an individual benefit, the real consequence is an erosion of national capacity," Brown continued. "How we got to this position was through an investment of the government and private entities. How we lost it was a disinvestment of government and private entities."

The press conference, which included six HBCU presidents, covered wide ground. Several discussed the importance of connecting more to each other, to other private and public colleges, to K-12 education and to the wider public. Others talked about the need to advocate for continued support for Pell Grants (some presidents said that 70 percent of students at their colleges were Pell-eligible), and about the communal and historical value of their institutions.

Friday, June 24, 2011 - 3:00am

F. Chris Garcia, a political scientist who was president of the University of New Mexico in 2002 and 2003, has been charged with helping to organize a prostitution ring allegedly led by a Fairleigh Dickinson University professor, The Albuquerque Journal reported. Garcia is charged with helping to identify and recruit women to be prostitutes. Authorities said that Garcia appeared not to have been motivated by profit, but by a desire to create a safe environment for prostitution.

Friday, June 24, 2011 - 3:00am

The nation’s historically black colleges and universities need to assume a far more active role in the national push to get more students to complete their degrees, a group of HBCU presidents said Thursday. "We need to be much more aggressive in taking the lead in setting the agenda," Walter Kimbrough, president of Arkansas' Philander Smith College, said at a news conference in Atlanta during a seminar organized by the Southern Education Foundation. "We are going to have to make a break from some of our historical ideology and looking at ourselves in a defensive posture."

Greater participation of HBCU's in the larger public debate will become only more urgent, many speakers noted, because of the shifting demographics of the student body. Kimbrough cited preliminary 2010 U.S. Census data showing that the majority of babies born in the U.S. over the past two years were not white. "By 2019 there’s not going to be one racial majority in this country," said Kimbrough. And, several speakers said, with nearly one in five black college students attending HBCU's, these institutions have a lot to contribute to conversations about how these students can succeed in higher education. But, even as HBCU's need to increase their expectations of students and welcome the push for accountability, several speakers lamented the funding environment. "You have these two trains running," said David Wilson, president of Morgan State University, in Maryland. "You have the college completion goal, and we’re not investing in the students we need to achieve that goal."

That trend is holding true in higher education more broadly, said Carlton Brown, president of Clark Atlanta University. "We want to regain a position from which we have fallen, but we haven’t addressed how we got there in the first place," said Brown, who added that a college education had been slowly redefined over time as an individual benefit rather than a broader societal one. "When you redefine it to an individual benefit, the real consequence is an erosion of national capacity," Brown continued. "How we got to this position was through an investment of the government and private entities. How we lost it was a disinvestment of government and private entities."

The press conference, which included six HBCU presidents, covered wide ground. Several discussed the importance of connecting more to each other, to other private and public colleges, to K-12 education and to the wider public. Others talked about the need to advocate for continued support for Pell Grants (some presidents said that 70 percent of students at their colleges were Pell-eligible), and about the communal and historical value of their institutions.

Friday, June 24, 2011 - 3:00am

William R. Harvey, president of Hampton University, and Norma B. Harvey, his wife, have donated $166,000 to the university for staff salaries. The money will pay for the 118 full-time staff members who earn less than $8 an hour to have their pay rate raised to $8 an hour. The gift follows a $1 million donation by the Harveys this year for faculty salaries.

Friday, June 24, 2011 - 3:00am

Two major education companies, Pearson and College Board, announced today that they are collaborating on a product aimed at more accurately gauging student readiness for college. The new product "identifies areas of strengths and weaknesses for each student and then builds a personalized learning path linking students to tutorials, interactive instruction and practice exercises," according to a release. The companies say they hope the new technology, which combines College Board's diagnostic software (Accuplacer) and Pearson's adaptive tutoring software (MyFoundationsLab), will prepare students for college-level work more efficiently than traditional remediation by assessing and addressing their specific weaknesses more precisely. Hunter Boylan, director of the National Center for Developmental Learning, told Inside Higher Ed that while he believes "the idea is probably sound," he cautioned against over-relying on technology to address the needs of students who need extra preparation.

Friday, June 24, 2011 - 3:00am

The U.S. Department of Education on Thursday released its latest data on students with disabilities in higher education. As of the 2008-9 academic year, 88 percent of two- and four-year institutions reported enrolling students with disabilities. Specific learning disabilities were the most common (31 percent), followed by Attention Deficit Disorder and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (which were counted separately) at 18 percent, then mental or psychiatric conditions at 15 percent. About a tenth of the reported learning disabilities were related to physical health and illness. Students who have trouble seeing accounted for 3 percent. The survey also revealed deficits between the needs of students with disabilities and what their college are providing. For example, while nearly every college has a main website, only 24 percent of them said they accommodated disabled users "to a major extent." About half of institutions cited financial barriers to training faculty and staff to accommodate various disabilities and buying "appropriate technology" for students with impairments.

Friday, June 24, 2011 - 3:00am

The House of Representatives on Thursday approved long-debated legislation to revamp federal patent laws, a measure that has strong support from higher education groups. The House-passed bill will have to be reconciled with a version the Senate approved in March, but the legislation is expected to be signed into law by President Obama.

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