Higher Education Quick Takes

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Tuesday, July 10, 2012 - 3:00am

Pennsylvania State University fund-raisers took in $208 million in the 2011-12 academic year, the second-most in institutional history, despite spending much of the year wracked in intense controversy related to child sexual abuse charges against a longtime football coach, the Centre Daily Times reported. But pledges and other measures of long-term giving were down, the newspaper reported.

Tuesday, July 10, 2012 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Cynthia Ebinger of the University of Rochester explains the connection between earthquakes, volcanism, and the changing thickness of the Earth’s tectonic plates. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

 

Monday, July 9, 2012 - 3:00am

President Obama and many educators are encouraging more American students to earn advanced degrees in science, but the jobs may not be there for those who do so, The Washington Post reported. There are fewer jobs in academe, but also in many of the business fields that have in the past hired science Ph.D.s. Many companies have slashed research jobs, the Post noted.

 

Monday, July 9, 2012 - 3:00am

Vienna Medical University is taking some criticism (particularly from men) for a policy that favors female applicants. The Associated Press reported that the university adjusts admissions test scores -- which determine admission -- based on the average scores for men and women. Since women score lower, on average, than do men, a score by a female applicant counts for more than the exact same score by a man. For instance, in the case of a man and woman both scoring 130, the woman's test grade would be 117.7 and the man's would be 114.8 because the average score for women on the exam is 97 and the average score for males is 102. Some women have joined men in questioning the policy, saying that they fear they will be seen as "quota women."

 

Monday, July 9, 2012 - 3:00am
  • Jane E. Clark, professor of kinesiology at the University of Maryland at College Park, has been named dean of the School of Public Health there.
  • Tom Gattis, associate vice president for academics at the Hong Kong campus of Savannah College of Art & Design, has been named chair of industrial design at Columbus College of Art & Design.
  • Kenneth C. Gotsch, CFO/vice chancellor of finance at City Colleges of Chicago, has been chosen as CFO at Columbia College Chicago.
  • Sheila Dove Jones, interim director of the Office of Planning and Assessment at Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania, has been promoted to the job on a permanent basis.
  • Lori A. Lewis, vice president for advancement at Marietta College, in Ohio, has been selected as vice president for institutional advancement at McDaniel College, in Maryland.
  • Sylvia Spears, assistant vice president for academic initiatives at New England College, in New Hampshire, has been appointed as vice president for diversity and inclusion at at Emerson College, in Massachusetts.

The appointments above are drawn from Inside Higher Ed's job changes database. To submit news about job changes and promotions, please click here.

Monday, July 9, 2012 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Greg Wilson of the University of Washington reveals how a slight change in tooth shape allowed early mammals to compete in a world dominated by dinosaurs. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

Monday, July 9, 2012 - 3:00am

In this month's edition of The Pulse podcast, Rod Murray discusses how to manage your social media portfolio with the help of "If This Then That," as well as Apple's new podcast app. The Pulse is Inside Higher Ed's monthly technology podcast, produced by Murray, executive director of the office of academic technology at University of the Sciences. Find out more about The Pulse here.

Monday, July 9, 2012 - 4:13am

The parent company of competency-based New Charter University is today announcing that it has bought Patten University, a regionally accredited nonprofit institution in California. UniversityNow, Inc., which introduced New Charter as a low-cost higher education provider that awards credit for what students prove they know and can do, said in a news release that its purchase of Patten would allow it to offer four-year degrees for roughly $10,000. Patten has hired Janet Holmgren, the longtime president of Mills College, also in Oakland, as its president.

Monday, July 9, 2012 - 2:57am

Bridgepoint Education announced today that the senior college commission of the Western Association of Schools and Colleges had denied its bid for initial accreditation for Ashford University, the for-profit company's highest-profile institution. Ashford remains accredited by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, but it had sought accreditation in the West -- where Bridgepoint is headquartered -- in part because of the Higher Learning Commission's increasingly chilly treatment of for-profit institutions.

Bridgepoint said that Ashford would both appeal the Western accreditor's decision and reapply for initial accreditation.

WASC's review of Ashford, which the accreditor is due to release later today, had been highly watched, especially because Congressional critics of the for-profit sector had sought to make fast-growing Ashford a poster child for how -- in their eyes -- some institutions have manipulated the accreditation system.

Details of why the Western accreditor denied Ashford's accreditation will be available later today. Follow Inside Higher Ed for continuing coverage.

 

Friday, July 6, 2012 - 3:00am

Public universities' law school clinics are not covered by the state's open records law, the New Jersey Supreme Court ruled Thursday, The Star-Ledger reported. The decision came in a suit by the developer of a mall who wanted access to records of groups working with a Rutgers University law clinic to block the mall's construction. Law clinic experts said that it would have been impossible for clinics to operate at public universities if all records could be obtained by groups in litigation with the clients represented by the clinics.

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