Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

November 26, 2012

Under court order, the University of Colorado has ended a ban on guns on campus and has even made it possible for students who are registered gun-owners to keep their weapons in their residence halls. At the Boulder and Colorado Springs campuses, the university said that it would create residential spaces for students with guns. But The Denver Post reported that although this option was announced in August, not a single student has asked to live where guns are permitted.

November 21, 2012

The Tufts University Board of Trustees has unanimously voted to rescind the honorary degree awarded to Lance Armstrong at commencement in 2006. "While continuing to respect the significant work of the Lance Armstrong Foundation, the board concluded that, in the wake of the recent report of the United States Anti-Doping Agency and its acceptance by the International Cycling Union, Mr. Armstrong's actions as an athlete are inconsistent with the values of Tufts University," said a university spokeswoman.

 

November 21, 2012

Columbia, Cornell and Yale Universities have announced an expansion of a program to teach less commonly taught languages at the three institutions. The universities are using live videoconferencing with small classes (limited to 12 each) out of the belief that these class sizes are best suited to language instruction. The program started with Romanian, elementary Dutch and elementary Nahuatl, the Aztec language, and has since expanded to other languages. A new grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation will allow for further expansion. This fall, the universities added courses in Bengali, Indonesian, Modern Greek, Tamil, Yoruba and Zulu. And in the fall of 2013, they plan to add courses in Khmer, Sinhala, Polish and Vietnamese.
 

November 21, 2012

In today’s Academic Minute, Daniel Lidar of the University of Southern California explains why diamonds may be the key to quantum computing. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

 

November 21, 2012

The Council for Higher Education Accreditation and the American Association of University Professors on Tuesday released a joint statement affirming the importance of academic freedom in higher education, and the role of accrediting in assuring that academic freedom exists and is nurtured. The statement, an advisory to accreditors and others, urges the review of accreditation standards to be sure the role of academic freedom receives appropriate attention. A statement from Judith Eaton, president of CHEA, said that the new document "is a response to concerns that academic freedom is increasingly challenged in today’s environment and that accreditation can play an even more helpful role in meeting this challenge."

November 21, 2012

An animal rights activist, Camille Marino, has pleaded guilty to trespass and unlawful posting of a message with aggravating circumstances, The Detroit Free Press reported. Marino was arrested in May when she chained herself to the doors of the library at Wayne State University. She had been posting messages online in which she said that a Wayne State researcher who works with animals -- whom she named, listing his home and office addresses and phone numbers -- should be tortured. She also sent e-mail to the researcher saying, "I hope you die a slow painful death comparable to those you forced your victims to endure. Please don't interpret this as a threat. It's merely my most fond wishes for you." After a court ordered her not to post the researcher's address again, she did so almost immediately, authorities said.

 

November 21, 2012

Edward Liebow will be the next executive director of the American Anthropological Association. Since 1986, he has worked at the Battelle Memorial Institute, the world’s largest nonprofit research and development organization. He also has been a board member of the anthropology association.

 

November 20, 2012

In today’s Academic Minute, Sora Kim of the University of Wyoming reveals how scientists are using advanced technology to understand the diet of the elusive white shark. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.


 

November 20, 2012

A new website, Science Works for Us, has been launched to document the impact on federally supported research of the possible across-the-board budget cut (or sequestration) that looms if President Obama and Congress don't reach a budget deal. The site was created by the Association of American Universities, the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities, and the Science Coalition. Among the features is a state-by-state map showing how much money would be lost to university research if sequestration goes forward.

November 20, 2012

Senator Marco Rubio of Florida is among the Republicans being talked about as one who might lead his party to more moderate positions on issues such as immigration. Rubio sits on the Senate science committee, and an interview with GQ created much Internet buzz over his statement in response to a question about the age of the earth. "I'm not a scientist, man," said Rubio. "I can tell you what recorded history says, I can tell you what the Bible says, but I think that's a dispute amongst theologians and I think it has nothing to do with the gross domestic product or economic growth of the United States. I think the age of the universe has zero to do with how our economy is going to grow. I'm not a scientist. I don't think I'm qualified to answer a question like that. At the end of the day, I think there are multiple theories out there on how the universe was created and I think this is a country where people should have the opportunity to teach them all. I think parents should be able to teach their kids what their faith says, what science says. Whether the Earth was created in seven days, or seven actual eras, I'm not sure we'll ever be able to answer that. It's one of the great mysteries."

 

I'm not a scientist, man. I can tell you what recorded history says, I can tell you what the Bible says, but I think that's a dispute amongst theologians and I think it has nothing to do with the gross domestic product or economic growth of the United States. I think the age of the universe has zero to do with how our economy is going to grow. I'm not a scientist. I don't think I'm qualified to answer a question like that. At the end of the day, I think there are multiple theories out there on how the universe was created and I think this is a country where people should have the opportunity to teach them all. I think parents should be able to teach their kids what their faith says, what science says. Whether the Earth was created in 7 days, or 7 actual eras, I'm not sure we'll ever be able to answer that. It's one of the great mysteries.

Read More http://www.gq.com/news-politics/politics/201212/marco-rubio-interview-gq-december-2012#ixzz2CicphQT6

Pages

Back to Top