Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

August 8, 2012

The proportion of all higher education employees whose work focuses on instruction or research rather than administration edged up slightly in 2011, but the proportion of instructors at four-year public universities who worked part time continued to rise, according to data released Tuesday by the Education Department's National Center for Education Statistics. The statistics, included in an annual publication that examines data on colleges' employment patterns and student financial aid, show the number of workers rising to 3.92 million at postsecondary institutions that award federal financial aid, with about 1.9 million involved in instruction or research (including graduate assistants) and the rest in administration or staff jobs. Of the instructional/research staff at public four-year institutions, 36.2 percent worked part time, up from 35.5 percent in 2010. The proportion of instructors who were part time actually fell, though, at community colleges and at private nonprofit four-year institutions.

The report also provides data on the price (before and after financial aid is awarded) at different types of institutions.

August 8, 2012

Higher One, a student payment processing service, on Tuesday announced its purchase of Campus Labs, a software company focused on student affairs. Higher One is a publicly traded company that currently dominates the market for debit cards colleges use to disburse financial aid to students, a business that has at times been controversial. The purchase of Campus Labs marks an expansion by the company into a new area.

August 8, 2012

Students with disabilities have a more difficult transition to college and the work force than do other students, and the lack of coordination among federal agencies and programs contributes to those problems, the U.S. Government Accountability Office said in a report Tuesday.

August 8, 2012

In today’s Academic Minute, Lawrence Rosenblum of the University of California at Riverside reveals how our senses are often telling us more than we consciously realize. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

 

August 7, 2012

A Pennsylvania State University trustee plans to appeal the severe punishment the National Collegiate Athletic Association imposed on the institution in the wake of its child sex abuse scandal, questioning whether the NCAA provided the university with due process and even whether Penn State's president had the authority to sign off on the penalties without getting approval from the university's full board, the Associated Press reported. The NCAA has asserted that it had clearance to impose the penalties on Penn State outside its normal enforcement and infractions process because of the outside investigation Penn State ordered and because Penn State consented to the penalties. But recent news reports have indicated that the board never formally approved Louis Freeh's external report and that many trustees were kept in the dark about the negotiations with the NCAA.

August 7, 2012

Fund raisers for schools, colleges and universities project that final numbers from the 2011-12 year will show a 4.9 percent gain in contributions, while 2012-13 will show a 5.9 percent gain, according to a survey by the Council for Advancement and Support of Education. In terms of projections for next year, public four-year institutions are projecting gains of 6.5 percent, while private four-year institutions and community colleges are both projecting gains of 6.1 percent. Private schools are projecting an increase of only 5.1 percent.

August 7, 2012

A former law student at the University of Virginia has pleaded guilty to breaking into the registrar's office in December to steal a request for his transcript, The Daily Progress reported. The man (at the time a student) had a summer internship offer, but had been told that the law firm would confirm what he had said about his grades with a transcript request. The student had reported a false grade-point average. The break-in, according to court documents, was not spur of the moment, but followed a period in which the student watched the registrar's office in person and with a camera to try to determine when the transcript request would arrive and how he would obtain it.

 

August 7, 2012

Four years after investors stepped in to stave off the death of Myers University, which has educated adults in Cleveland since the 1850s, the institution -- now called Chancellor University -- once again faces an existential threat, this time at the hands of its regional accreditor. The Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools voted in late June to put Chancellor on "show cause" status, meaning that the institution will be shut down if its officials cannot persuade the accreditor within a year that it has ameliorated the agency's concerns, which relate to weak finances, conflicts of interest and poor student retention.

It has been a bumpy few years for the institution since 2008, when the Higher Learning Commission granted permission for Myers' buyers (led by the high-profile investor Michael Clifford) to transform it into Chancellor. Clifford had grand plans, including the naming of the institution's management school for Jack Welch, the former head of General Electric. (The management school has since been sold to another for-profit institution, Strayer University.) But it wasn't long before the institution was back in turmoil; in February 2010, the Higher Learning Commission gave it a show cause order, but the commission concluded by February 2011 that the institution had addressed its concerns. But quarterly reports filed by the institution triggered new concerns last February, leading to the new show cause order.

Chancellor University officials told Crain's Cleveland Business that the institution would get through the current crisis as it did two years ago. “Every member of the leadership team and the board of trustees would swear in a court of law, on the Bible and the U.S. Constitution that this institution is significantly better than it was when it got off show-cause” last time, President Robert Daugherty told the newspaper.
 

August 7, 2012

The American Bar Associations has announced that it will not accredit law schools outside the United States. Several panels of the ABA have studied the issue. An association statement said that reviewing foreign law schools would "divert the [legal education] section's attention and resources at a time of significant strain on its finances and personnel." At the same time, the ABA said that there was a "need to identify and establish appropriate standards and procedures for the licensing of foreign lawyers who would like to practice in this country." The impetus for the review was a request for accreditation from the Peking University School of Transnational Law, which offers students both a Chinese-style law degree and a J.D. program based on American law school curriculums.I have e-mail out to Peking -- will add reaction if I get one -sj

 

August 7, 2012

The University of New Orleans issued a statement late Monday clarifying the "hiatus" it had declared for its university press. The university last month told the director of the press (the only full-time employee) that his job had been eliminated and that the press would be on "hiatus." The statement issued Monday says: "The UNO Press is not being closed. It is presently on a brief hiatus, during which time it will be accepting no new manuscripts while the administration reviews the UNO Press' business plan. The UNO Press plays an important role as a publisher of scholarly and literary books, and we hope it will return to full operation soon. All contracts that have been issued will be honored."

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