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Friday, March 30, 2012 - 3:00am

The American Council on Education has named 57 faculty members and administrators as the 2012-13 class of the association's Fellows Program. The fellows are assigned to work for a year with a senior administrator at another institution, while also attending special educational programs. More than 300 fellows have gone on to become presidents while more than 1,100 have served as provosts, vice presidents or deans.

Friday, March 30, 2012 - 4:32am

More moves by adjuncts to unionize:

  • Adjuncts at Bergen Community College have voted to unionize through the American Federation of Teachers, The Bergen County Record reported. New Jersey community colleges have seen strong union representation among adjuncts, and organizers at Bergen said that they were impressed with gains made at other campuses.
  • The United Steelworkers -- not a major force in academic labor, but a major force in Pittsburgh labor -- has started a campaign to organize adjuncts at Duquesne University, The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reported. The union is considering similar drives among adjuncts at other colleges in the area.

 

Friday, March 30, 2012 - 3:00am

The Senate at Semmelweis University, in Hungary, voted to revoke the doctorate of Pal Schmitt, the president of Hungary, because of an inquiry that found extensive passages were copied from the work of others, the Associated Press reported. The doctorate was awarded by the University of Physical Education, which has since been absorbed by Semmelweis. The committee that studied the dissertation also faulted the University of Physical Education for not identifying the "unusually extensive" copying nor bringing it to Schmitt’s attention. That failure, the committee said, may have led him to believe that "his dissertation meets expectations."

 

Friday, March 30, 2012 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, William Ellis of Saint Michael's College reveals the connection between American rock and roll pioneer Sam Phillips and the roots of reggae. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

Friday, March 30, 2012 - 3:00am

John Huppenthal, Arizona's superintendent of schools, led a successful campaign to suspend Mexican-American studies from the Tucson public schools. Fox News reported that he now has the University of Arizona Mexican-American studies program as a target. "I think that’s where this toxic thing starts from, the universities,” Huppenthal said in an interview with Fox News Latino. "To me, the pervasive problem was the lack of balance going on in these classes." It is unclear what Huppenthal could do to a public university program. A university spokesman said via e-mail: "We're not issuing public comment at this time, since there haven't been any conversations yet between the university and Mr. Huppenthal regarding the Mexican-American studies program."

Friday, March 30, 2012 - 3:00am

Providence's mayor urged Rhode Island legislators Thursday to approve legislation that would allow the state's cities to charge colleges and other nonprofit institutions taxes of up to 25 percent of what they would owe if they were taxable entities, The Boston Globe reported. Providence is among numerous cities that have been looking to their tax-exempt institutions to help it fill budget gaps left by state budget cuts and declines in other revenues.


 

Friday, March 30, 2012 - 4:27am

Laureate Education Inc., a major player in for-profit higher education, is preparing an initial public offering, Reuters reported. The past year has been a tough one for many for-profit entities, but Laureate's international emphasis (half of its revenues come from Brazil, Chile and Mexico, countries experiencing huge increases in demand for higher education) has helped the company grow. Laureate declined to comment for the Reuters report.

 

Thursday, March 29, 2012 - 4:28am

Faculty members at New England College quickly pledged to donate $100,000 after learning that the college planned staff layoffs, and that such a sum would prevent them, The Concord Monitor reported. The layoffs had been planned as one way to deal with a $350,000 deficit created by an enrollment shortfall. While the layoffs have been averted, staff members will be required to take furlough days (anywhere from five days to several weeks) between now and June.

Thursday, March 29, 2012 - 3:00am

A county judge ruled Wednesday that the University of California can release its full report on police officers' controversial use of pepper spray to disperse student protesters last fall, withholding only the names of most of the officers, the San Jose Mercury News reported. The university's police union had sued to block the release of the full report, arguing that some elements of it should remain confidential, as would be the case with the results of a police internal affairs investigation. Judge Evelio Grillo rejected that comparison, but agreed that names and ranks of officers could be withheld to prevent harassment of officers.

A UC statement said that the university would ultimately like to release the officers' names, and that it remained unclear exactly when the report would be made public.

 

Thursday, March 29, 2012 - 4:31am

The Roman Catholic group at Vanderbilt University on Wednesday announced that it would become an off-campus ministry rather than staying on campus and trying to comply with a university anti-bias rule that bars all student groups from discriminating on the basis of religion (among other factors), The Tennessean reported. Vanderbilt is among a number of colleges and universities that require all student organizations to be fully open to all students. Some Republican legislators are pushing to bar state student aid from going to such colleges, Nashville Public Radio reported.

 

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