Higher Education Webinars

Mama PhD

Mothers attempting to balance parenthood and academics.

July 19, 2010 - 7:57pm
About once a week I take down the biggest mixing bowl I have and start pouring, dropping, and even occasionally measuring things into it. A carton of oatmeal; a bag of whole raw almonds; a couple of handfuls each of pumpkin and sunflower seeds; wheat germ, flaxseed meal, and/or sesame seeds, if I have them. I stir them around, then add spices (cinnamon and ginger, a little salt), oil, and sweeteners — lately, equal parts honey and agave syrup. Stir it up, spread it in two rimmed baking sheets, and put it in the oven.
July 18, 2010 - 7:29pm
Last week I wrote about the insanity of life as a freelancer. This week I’m writing from a cabin in Maine, with no cell signal and sporadic Internet access. The cabin overlooks a quiet bay, where I swim in the mornings. You can’t see other houses in any direction, and when we turn the lights out at night, the only illumination is from the moon and the stars. In the city, I am wired and at the computer by 5AM; this morning, I slept until 9 for the first time in at least ten years.
July 15, 2010 - 8:06pm
Last week, the greater Cleveland area let out a collective groan as we learned that our star basketball player would be moving from the local team. As I watched him and several other star players congregate in another team, I was reminded of the game “Monopoly." As you may remember, this game is won by amassing market power and then charging fellow players high prices for landing on one’s property. A similar approach is taken by monopolies in the marketplace, where market power forces consumers to pay higher prices for goods than would be otherwise expected.
July 15, 2010 - 8:48am
My daughter, Katie, is staying with me in Chicago for a few weeks this summer. She turns fifteen this Thursday, and we’ve been spending a lot of time together planning her birthday — her Quinceañero, as she keeps reminding me… Last week we drove to my parent’s house in Florida. Their 50th wedding anniversary is coming up this fall and we’ve been looking through photo albums. My sister Julie -- a writer, Presbyterian minister and our resident family genealogist -- was also there, overseeing our photo archiving.
July 14, 2010 - 4:37am
When I was midway through 10th grade I became “foreign correspondent” for my high school newspaper. This title I achieved because my family moved to Australia for nine months while my father took a sabbatical at the Australian National University in Canberra. So I started 10th grade over again at school there, where I enjoyed basking in the relatively popular international image of Americans (those were good times). Somewhere I have a copy of the four or five stories I sent back – one in particular I remember interviewing my peers about their impressions of Americans.
July 12, 2010 - 9:14pm
(My last blog post contained a spoiler alert—this one may need a “book nerd” alert, for I fear that its musings are only of interest to folks like me whose books threaten to take over their living spaces. Consider yourself warned.)
July 11, 2010 - 6:57pm
For most of my working life — including school vacations in high school and college — I have worked at full-time, on-site jobs. This was what my father did, and my mother when she returned to work after my younger brother entered high school, and it’s how I had always defined "working." I took time off to be with my son when he was small, but that was understood to be temporary, and it was.
July 8, 2010 - 7:48pm
There is a concept in Labor Economics known as "internal labor markets," which notices that many firms hire employees only at specific points in their career paths and then train them with very firm specific training once they are there. This is a concept that most of us in academics readily acknowledge, as many faculty members are hired at the assistant professor level and then progress on their career paths within that one institution.
July 8, 2010 - 7:59am
This past month, I have been trying to follow fellow blogger Kerry Ann Rockquemore’s advice on how to eliminate summer regret by breaking up my writing goals into small tasks and plotting them onto a calendar of available days. I scheduled weekly dates with my writing “coach”/colleague. I made progress by forcing myself to write drafts even before I felt quite ready, instead of circling around and around a project.
July 6, 2010 - 7:36pm
This week I'm reporting from Edmonton, Alberta, at the half-way point of our family vacation. With our car looking like something out of the Beverly Hillbillies, we took off for our first ever family road trip. Now, a car trip with kids ages 5 and 9 might not seem like such a big deal, and some of you (those with particularly calm, easy-going children, perhaps?) might be wondering why we've never done this before. My husband and I both remember fondly long drives to see relatives throughout Canada and the U.S.

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