Higher Education Webinars

Mama PhD

Mothers attempting to balance parenthood and academics.

July 14, 2010 - 4:37am
When I was midway through 10th grade I became “foreign correspondent” for my high school newspaper. This title I achieved because my family moved to Australia for nine months while my father took a sabbatical at the Australian National University in Canberra. So I started 10th grade over again at school there, where I enjoyed basking in the relatively popular international image of Americans (those were good times). Somewhere I have a copy of the four or five stories I sent back – one in particular I remember interviewing my peers about their impressions of Americans.
July 12, 2010 - 9:14pm
(My last blog post contained a spoiler alert—this one may need a “book nerd” alert, for I fear that its musings are only of interest to folks like me whose books threaten to take over their living spaces. Consider yourself warned.)
July 11, 2010 - 6:57pm
For most of my working life — including school vacations in high school and college — I have worked at full-time, on-site jobs. This was what my father did, and my mother when she returned to work after my younger brother entered high school, and it’s how I had always defined "working." I took time off to be with my son when he was small, but that was understood to be temporary, and it was.
July 8, 2010 - 7:48pm
There is a concept in Labor Economics known as "internal labor markets," which notices that many firms hire employees only at specific points in their career paths and then train them with very firm specific training once they are there. This is a concept that most of us in academics readily acknowledge, as many faculty members are hired at the assistant professor level and then progress on their career paths within that one institution.
July 8, 2010 - 7:59am
This past month, I have been trying to follow fellow blogger Kerry Ann Rockquemore’s advice on how to eliminate summer regret by breaking up my writing goals into small tasks and plotting them onto a calendar of available days. I scheduled weekly dates with my writing “coach”/colleague. I made progress by forcing myself to write drafts even before I felt quite ready, instead of circling around and around a project.
July 6, 2010 - 7:36pm
This week I'm reporting from Edmonton, Alberta, at the half-way point of our family vacation. With our car looking like something out of the Beverly Hillbillies, we took off for our first ever family road trip. Now, a car trip with kids ages 5 and 9 might not seem like such a big deal, and some of you (those with particularly calm, easy-going children, perhaps?) might be wondering why we've never done this before. My husband and I both remember fondly long drives to see relatives throughout Canada and the U.S.
July 1, 2010 - 7:48pm
Labor economists have an interesting way of looking at leisure time, and it should not come as a surprise to anyone at this time of the year. We call most things that we can buy “normal goods”, because more income generally leads us to buy more of such things. Along these lines, we recognize that leisure is actually a “normal good”, and something that is desired and, in a sense, “purchased” when we take time out to enjoy ourselves rather than use that time to work and earn money.
July 1, 2010 - 7:54am
I’ve been traveling around the country lately talking about the B.P. oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, screening excerpts of my Louisiana documentary and seeking solutions with other concerned individuals. It’s clear that no group or individual — not BP, the federal government, Kevin Costner -- has enough answers to this environmental disaster. It should be no surprise that the communities along the Gulf Coast feel abandoned with this mess.
June 30, 2010 - 8:27am
My family and I are once again located at our favorite summer marine biology research station (our “summer camp for biologists”) through mid-July. Not only is it a research facility, but the marine station also offers summer intensive courses in different areas of marine biology, mostly for graduate students but a few advanced undergrads and some postdocs participate too.
June 28, 2010 - 8:59pm
[SPOILER ALERT: SOME PLOT DETAILS OF TOY STORY 3 REVEALED BELOW]This is my 100th blog post for Inside Higher Ed, if my naming conventions for the almost-weekly posts can be trusted. So in a perhaps self-indulgent celebration, I’m musing here a bit on some favorite family movies.


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