Higher Education Webinars

Mama PhD

Mothers attempting to balance parenthood and academics.

August 23, 2010 - 8:36pm
A week ago on Monday afternoon — the time when I usually write this blog post — I was in a car headed back to Richmond after a long weekend visiting family in Connecticut and upstate New York. Today, I’m in my office, having met my advisees last week and my first group of new students today. I’ll meet my second class tomorrow and then the school year will be well and truly underway.
August 22, 2010 - 5:12pm
Aeron Haynie’s excellent post on girls and weight/eating issues made me rethink Ms. Mentor’s most recent column, “Being Nice or Getting the Job Done.” When I first read the Ms. Mentor column, it seemed like straightforward advice on a situation that is fairly common with younger employees.
August 19, 2010 - 9:19pm
Last week, I watched my daughter giggle as she made her way down the water slide at our public pool. She was floating on a mat that was pushed along by a stream of water until she was dropped, amidst laughter and delight, into the deep end of the pool. Ever the geek, I could not help but think of the concepts of “stocks” and “flows” in economics. Stocks are compared to the amount of water in the pool at any one time, while flows are the rate of change of that water, how much water is pumped into the pool minus the amount of water leaving the pool.
August 18, 2010 - 8:14pm
Like many who enjoyed Elizabeth Gilbert’s travel memoir Eat, Pray, Love, I’m excited to see the film, but wary, since my pleasure in reading it derived less from the plot and more from Gilbert’s prose and her skill in interweaving personal with factual. I particularly enjoyed the first section of her journey, which describes her travels in Italy and the intense pleasure of eating as Gilbert let go of the usual restrictions white middle class American women impose on themselves.
August 18, 2010 - 7:10am
I’ve come to the end of a three-week writing retreat. My husband and I have both been working on writing projects as visiting scholars at the Whiteley Center at the Friday Harbor Labs on San Juan Island, Washington. Over the years the labs have become more than an academic setting for us; it’s a second home for our family. Although we’re only seasonal and short-term residents, we’ve come to know people at the labs and in the community with whom we renew ties every year.
August 15, 2010 - 5:43pm
Parents of high schoolers here in New York have been following the recent events at Hunter High School with interest and some anxiety.
August 12, 2010 - 6:58pm
There is a concept in economics called a “tournament”. It notices that one way to motivate people to do something that you want them to do is to set up a tournament by setting out a goal that many people are willing to work for, and then encourage them to behave in a way that you desire in order to achieve that goal. The tenure process comes to mind immediately when I think of such tournaments, for the tenure process gives us a goal to work for, and in the process we align our behavior with that desired by the university.
August 12, 2010 - 4:31am
I am writing this column from the annual conference that I attend every year with fellow academics — the University Film & Video Association (UFVA). This year we’re meeting in Burlington, Vermont. Like many schools, my university travel budget is fairly low this year. So this trip is also my vacation.
August 9, 2010 - 8:24pm
This summer for the first time my family joined a CSA (Community-Supported Agriculture). We signed up to receive a weekly supply of vegetables from a local farm family, paying in advance to minimize their risk and ensure that we’d get an ample supply of fresh vegetables every week.It was a little bit of a leap of faith. Friends have done it in the past, but this was our first time, and we weren’t quite sure what we’d get. We weren’t sure we’d like it, or that we’d be able to use it all up before the next week. We weren’t sure it would be worth the price.
August 8, 2010 - 3:38pm
In a recent New York Times article David Leonhardt makes a point that we on this site have been discussing for years: as the gender gap closes in terms of equal pay for equal work, mothers continue to be underemployed and struggling. The market favors those who can put in long, uninterrupted hours, weeks, and years building their careers, and those people tend to be men — whether or not they are parents—and single or childless women.

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