Higher Education Webinars

Mama PhD

Mothers attempting to balance parenthood and academics.

April 1, 2010 - 7:55am
I’ve never considered myself an administrator. I’m a teacher first, a scholar second, and committee member/service provider third. I doubt that very many professors begin their careers intending to become chairs, deans or college presidents. After all, the duties of an administrator — dealing with paperwork, making pragmatic decisions, being politic and worrying about the fiscal well-being of the institution — is quite different from the isolated pursuit of truth that most of us sign up for.
March 29, 2010 - 11:42pm
A few months ago I offered some advice to my daughter in this space, about keeping her options open and getting a good summer job. I stand by that advice, and now, in the pre-registration advising season, I find I have a little more.
March 28, 2010 - 7:33pm
I take a singing class on Monday nights. This is joyful recreation for me, as well as a nostalgic experience -- I studied acting, singing, and movement at this theater school in my youth, before I was seduced into graduate school by the prospect of regular meals and the possibility of aging gracefully.
March 25, 2010 - 7:50pm
A central tenet of economics is the assumption of non-satiation. This concept says that people will always want more of a good, that there is no such thing as “enough” fancy cars or chocolate cake. Of course, there can be more than enough of a bad thing, such as garbage. This assumption might be summarized by the phrase “more (or a good thing) is better.” Anyone who has been a parent to a young child knows this almost reflexive reaction to something they want. I recall times when my then two year old daughter was delighted with something and simply proclaimed “more.”
March 25, 2010 - 7:48am
Enough work has been done in the field of “happiness” to award it with an academic designation as an enigmatic new field of study.
March 24, 2010 - 8:15am
A recent piece in The New York Times discusses a trend in parenting that they call the “Mommy Wars”: competitive, judgmental child rearing. Several contributors to this discussion suggest that the web is responsible for this trend - the anonymous and ever-present, often first source of information from parenting sites, comments, and blogs.
March 22, 2010 - 9:11pm
When I saw the piece on "the other 'F' word" in this week's Chronicle, I have to admit it took me a while before I felt like reading it. Really? I thought, are we still talking about families and the academy? Aren't we done yet?
March 21, 2010 - 8:26pm
TWO STUDIES OF POSSIBLE INTEREST
March 18, 2010 - 9:53pm
If you took Geometry in High School, you almost definitely learned it as a subject based on rules and axioms discovered by the ancient Greeks. The details of this subject, which I must admit was probably my favorite class in High School (what a geek!), reflected the world view of the ancient Greeks, including the perception of the world as a flat surface. On this flat surface, triangles have exactly 180 degrees, and parallel lines go on forever and never intersect. This is called “Euclidean Geometry.”
March 18, 2010 - 6:56am
One of the challenges of teaching is negotiating students with severe psychological conditions — of which we teachers are sometimes informed, but never trained for. Sometimes these students are disruptive (as in the case of a student with Asperger’s who offended and alienated other students with her socially awkward comments) but often they just suffer quietly, withdrawn and/or mysteriously absent from class.

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