Higher Education Quick Takes

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Wednesday, April 11, 2012 - 3:00am

Nine students at Boston University are likely to face criminal charges and possible suspension after a bizarre discovery by police early Monday morning, The Boston Globe reported. After receiving a complaint about noise in a fraternity house, authorities found five BU students in the basement. They were tied up and duct-taped to each other, and were wearing only underwear. Police said that the students had welts on their backs and had been covered in honey and hot sauce. Students in the house belong to Alpha Epsilon Pi fraternity, which is not affiliated with BU. The national fraternity has suspended the BU chapter.

 

Wednesday, April 11, 2012 - 3:00am

Excelencia in Education on Tuesday released data showing Latino college completion rates, by state. "The state-level data on Latino college completion show that today’s investment, or lack thereof, in Latino academic preparation and degree attainment can have a compounding effect on state populations, economies, and communities in the near future,” said Deborah Santiago, the organization's co-founder and vice president for policy and research.

Wednesday, April 11, 2012 - 4:27am

A drag show planned for tonight at the University of San Diego has prompted debate at the Roman Catholic institution. Alumni who are angry about the drag show have created a website called Alumni for a Catholic USD protesting "the promotion of values that are directly contrary to our Catholic faith and traditions." Some are threatening to stop donating to the university. Thousands have signed a petition against the event. Mary Lyons, the president of the university, has defended the right of campus groups to put on the show. And now a new alumni group has been formed to support the university's leaders for not barring the drag show. A USD for Everyone's website says: "Many of us are alums who have worked together at USD to ensure that our alma mater was an inclusive community. Our jobs didn’t end as students. As alums, we have the responsibility to ensure USD remains a place for everyone."

Wednesday, April 11, 2012 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Julio Martinez-Trujillo of McGill University explains how our brains allow us to focus on more than one thing at a time. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

Wednesday, April 11, 2012 - 4:29am

Staff members at Christopher Newport University removed copies of the student newspaper last week because of an article about a possible meth lab on in a dormitory, The Richmond Times-Dispatch reported. Officials were reportedly worried about having the article visible when prospective students and their families were on campus. Paul Trible, the president of the university, condemned the removal of the papers. "This action was taken by young employees who love CNU and were concerned that a newspaper article would create a bad impression for visiting prospective students," Trible said. "Their actions were inappropriate and they will be disciplined in accordance with university procedures."

Wednesday, April 11, 2012 - 3:00am

Chalk up another victory for the Iowa Electronic Markets. The University of Iowa tool, which Inside Higher Ed profiled last fall ahead of the Iowa caucuses, allows people to invest small amounts of cash in support of candidates for political offices or positions on various other matters, and the markets have a good track record of predicting outcomes. The market for the Republican presidential race had lots of variation last summer, but since September 2011, the investors' choice has been Mitt Romney, who on Tuesday became the presumptive nominee when Rick Santorum suspended his campaign. 

Wednesday, April 11, 2012 - 3:00am

The University of California at Los Angeles told 894 waitlisted students they had been admitted last weekend, only to backtrack hours later, The Los Angeles Times reported.

The college sent an e-mail about financial aid to accepted and waitlisted students. But one line that was only supposed to be on the message to accepted students also appeared in the form letter to those on the waitlist: "Once again congratulations on your admission to UCLA, we hope that this information will assist you in making your decision to join the Bruin Family in the fall," the message read. UCLA officials informed those students Monday that they were still on the waitlist, and offered an apology.

This has happened before. Vassar College mistakenly told some early decision applicants this winter that they had gotten in, only to write back telling them they were actually rejected. And, The Times reported,  the University of California campuses in San Diego and Santa Barbara have accidentally told students they were accepted in past years.

 

Tuesday, April 10, 2012 - 3:00am

The National Labor College, facing financial difficulties, has decided to sell its entire campus (located in the Washington suburbs), but officials insist that the institution has a viable future. The college -- the academic arm of the labor movement -- offers degree and certificate programs for leaders and future leaders of unions. Most programs are distance, but involve residencies, which have taken place on the campus. Paula Peinovich, the president, said in an interview that the decision was a "very hard" one. "The sale of the property is not something that the board of the college has chosen to do lightly," she added. "But faced with financial issues, the board is going to focus on the college." She said that the property will need to be rezoned to be sold to a developer, and that the process means that the college isn't relocating immediately. Eventually, she said that the residency portions of the college's programs would take place at union facilities or academic centers around the country.

The campus also includes a conference center, which will be sold, and the AFL-CIO archives, which are used by scholars of labor history. Peinovich said that the AFL-CIO owns the archives, and that the college is in discussion with the AFL-CIO about where the collections will go.

The National Labor College had thought it would gain a secure financial partnership through a partnership with the Princeton Review (a partnership some in academic labor questioned because of the concerns of many faculty members in the union movement about for-profit higher education). But the Princeton Review pulled out of that partnership in November.

Tuesday, April 10, 2012 - 3:00am

State spending on higher education increased by $10.5 billion in absolute terms from 1990 to 2010, but considering changes in enrollments and inflation, funding per public full-time equivalent student dropped by 26.1 percent from 1990-1991 to 2009-2010, according to a report released Monday by the think tank Demos. During the same period, the report documents, tuition at public institution has seen large increases in many states. While many of those states have also increased aid budgets, a large share of those funds has gone to programs that are not based on financial need. The report notes that household income has not generally increased to match the tuition increases, and that the volume of outstanding student debt has grown by a factor of 4.5 since 1999.

Tuesday, April 10, 2012 - 3:00am
  • Elizabeth Ambos, assistant vice chancellor for research at the California State University System, has been selected as executive officer of the Council on Undergraduate Research, in Washington, D.C.
  • Thomas Chiles, a professor of biology at Boston College, has been named the Dr. Michael E. and Dr. Salvatore A. DeLuca professor of biology there.
  • Brian P. Darmody, associate vice president of research and economic development at the University of Maryland at College Park, has been given the additional title of director of corporate relations.
  • Sandra Lagana, head women’s soccer coach and assistant sports information director at Ferrum College, in Virginia, has been appointed as head women’s soccer coach at McDaniel College, in Maryland.
  • Tim Regan-Porter, president and CEO of Paste Media Group, has been chosen as director of the Center for Collaborative Journalism at Mercer University, in Georgia.
  • Peter A. Spina, president emeritus of Monroe Community College, in New York, has been named interim president of Tidewater Community College, in Virginia.

The appointments above are drawn from Inside Higher Ed's job changes database. To submit news about job changes and promotions, please click here.

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