Higher Education Quick Takes

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Thursday, June 21, 2012 - 3:00am

As more college admissions counselors are seeking specialized training, a newly released paper from the National Association for College Admission Counseling argues that high school college readiness counseling requires standardized training, too. Author Mandy Savitz-Romer wrote that high school college readiness counseling lacks pre- or in-service requirements, or a unified certification or body of knowledge, and she proposed a set of core areas of competency that should be part of a pre-service training program for prospective counselors:

  • Psychological processes associated with college readiness
  • Social environments that affect students’ resources for succeeding in college
  • Microeconomics, especially related to individual decision-making behavior
  • Educational reform policies related to college readiness
  • Higher education research, including college access and enrollment and college choice theories
  • Family engagement models
Thursday, June 21, 2012 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Carey Rappaport of Northeastern University explains the development of a new generation of body scanners that will provide an increase in security and privacy for airline passengers. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

Thursday, June 21, 2012 - 3:00am

Weixing Li, a professor at the University of Nebraska at Lincoln who was detained in China while there with a student group, will be allowed to return to the United States, The Lincoln Journal Star reported. The professor contacted family members to tell them he will be able to leave.

 

Thursday, June 21, 2012 - 3:00am

The commissioners of six major football-playing conferences (plus the University of Notre Dame) reached agreement Wednesday on the framework for a four-team playoff for big-time college football, to begin in 2014, ESPN reported. The plan needs the approval of the college presidents on the committee that oversees the Bowl Championship Series, which is scheduled to meet next week in Washington. Under the proposal, the existing BCS system for choosing a national champion would be replaced as of 2014 by a system in which a committee would choose four teams to play in two semifinal games (based on the current bowl games) leading to a championship game.

Thursday, June 21, 2012 - 4:19am

In a move that has been feared for months, Rutgers University has announced plans for a major construction project that will block access to the parking lot known as home to many of the grease trucks that are popular with students, The Star-Ledger reported. While university officials have pledged to come up with someplace for the trucks to be located, their many fans are worried about any change. "You can’t fault Rutgers for expanding, but when you have something that is known nationally, you don’t want to get rid of that for another astronomy classroom," said D.J. Skopelitis, a former Rutgers graduate student. He was interviewed while he was eating a "Fat Beach" sandwich -- a cheese steak with chicken fingers, mozzarella sticks, lettuce, ketchup and French fries.

 

Wednesday, June 20, 2012 - 3:00am

Corinthian Colleges Inc. on Tuesday announced that it would sell two of its six WyoTech campuses, located in California and Florida. The for-profit has yet to secure a buyer, according to a corporate filing, and will discontinue operations at the campuses until one is found. WyoTech's academic programs focus primarily on automotive technology. In March Corinthian announced the sale or closure of seven of its Everest College campuses, which had been struggling financially.

Wednesday, June 20, 2012 - 3:00am

The Ohio Supreme Court decided largely in favor of Ohio State University in an open records lawsuit brought by ESPN pertaining to the 2011 football scandal, CBS News reported. ESPN filed the suit -- which held that the university improperly cited the federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act in withholding or removing names from documents -- in July. The court said the university mostly adhered to FERPA, but it did order the university to release a few records that had been withheld entirely as long as students' names were redacted. A university statement issued Tuesday said, "Ohio State appreciates the clarity given today by the Ohio Supreme Court affirming the university's interpretation of federal student privacy laws."

Wednesday, June 20, 2012 - 3:00am

The Purdue University Board of Trustees will convene Thursday to vote on the university's next president -- which sources, including Indiana Public Media, have reported will be Indiana Governor Mitch Daniels.

At some universities, professors have objected to the appointments of non-academics to presidential post. But faculty leaders at Purdue are open to the idea. Joseph Camp, secretary of faculties for the university's Faculty Senate, said Daniels' political background would not affect his ability to be president: "I don't know if there's anything in his background that will either qualify or disqualify him to be president, so what I have to do is maintain an open mind, and like everyone else, I'm curious to see how this all works out."

Another member of the senate, Vice Chair David Williams, shared his view. Williams wrote in an e-mail that although "considerable voice" has been given to the next president being an academic, he sees the importance of having a president who can harness entrepreneurship at the university to attract funding. "Mitch Daniels has been successful in the business world, and in the political world. He could very well be the right person, at the right time, coming into the right environment. I find that prospect exciting," he wrote.

Wednesday, June 20, 2012 - 3:00am

Several law schools have in the last year been found to be doctoring the statistics about their entering classes, trying to make the incoming students look more impressive so that their institutions would rise in the rankings. Now the American Bar Association and the Law School Admission Council have announced a new program in which they will verify the accuracy of such data. The groups will compare data from various sources to provide an assurance that law schools are being truthful. "Many schools have expressed an interest in such a program," said John O’Brien, chair of the Council of the ABA Section of Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar. "In an environment where the actions of a few schools have raised questions in the minds of some about the integrity of data reporting by law schools more generally, this program gives schools a straightforward and efficient method to have their admissions data verified."

 

Wednesday, June 20, 2012 - 4:27am

Advocates for Asian-American students are criticizing a new report from the Pew Research Center, which is well known for its demographic studies. The Pew report, "The Rise of Asian Americans," is generally quite positive about their status in American life. Citing survey and other data, the report begins: "Asian Americans are the highest-income, best-educated and fastest-growing racial group in the United States. They are more satisfied than the general public with their lives, finances and the direction of the country, and they place more value than other Americans do on marriage, parenthood, hard work and career success."

But a joint statement from the Asian & Pacific Islander American Scholarship Fund and the National Commission on Asian American and Pacific Islander Research in Education said that the data presented by Pew obscured continuing challenges facing recent Asian immigrants (as opposed to those here for several generations). The report "only reinforces the mischaracterizations of Asian American and Pacific Islander students that contribute to their exclusion from federally-supported policies, programs, and initiatives. Presenting such findings offer nothing in the way of positive changes for this historically underserved student population. This data only further burdens down Asian American students who have to fight against the 'model minority myth,' a misleading falsehood that deems them to be well-educated and financially successful."

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