Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

June 10, 2013

The Denver public school district is trying a new approach to deal with the problem of high school graduates who aren't ready for college-level work. A new summer program will offer free remedial education in mathematics and science, The Denver Post reported. More than 60 percent of Denver graduates who enroll in college need remediation of some sort, and the school system wants to bring that number down.

 

June 10, 2013

Phyllis Richman has had a successful career in journalism, and she recently came across a letter she received from a Harvard University professor in 1961, when she was applying to a graduate program there. "[O]ur experience, even with brilliant students, has been that married women find it difficult to carry out worthwhile careers ...  and hence tend to have some feeling of waste about the time and effort spent in professional education," said the letter. It went on to ask Richman to explain how she could balance career and family goals. She didn't answer at the time. But in The Washington Post, she now has done so -- and women of her generation and many of younger generations are praising the response.

 

 

June 10, 2013

Parker Executive Search, currently in the news because of its role in the controversial selection of a new athletic director at Rutgers University, has grown considerably in its influence, and also has been involved in a number of botched searches, The Indianapolis Star reported. The search firm has been involved in 12 executive searches for the National Collegiate Athletic Association, so many searches that one consultant is quoted in the article as saying the NCAA relationship "looks a little incestuous." The article cited examples of Parker-led searches for athletics positions in which the eventual selections had short-lived careers due to failure to win games, arrests for driving under the influence, and an arrest for domestic violence. The article also said that critics say the firm "pushes certain candidates regardless of their fit for a position." At the same time, the search firm has many fans and repeat customers.

June 7, 2013

WASHINGTON -- The House of Representatives voted 224-201 on Thursday to end the Department of Homeland Security's "deferred action" program, which allows young immigrants who came to the U.S. illegally should this be "whose parents came to the United States illegally"? otherwise it makes it sound like it was the bringing of the children that was illegal ... to avoid deportation and get work authorization. The provision, an amendment to the department's budget for the 2014shouldn't this be 2014? fiscal year, is unlikely to become law -- the White House vowed it would not in a statement Thursday night -- but illustrates the conflict over immigration as Congress prepares a comprehensive reform.

June 7, 2013

In today’s Academic Minute, Tim Blackburn of the University of Birmingham reveals the connection between human migration and the extinction of tropical birds. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

June 7, 2013

An article in The New York Times’s China edition explores the vast scope of Chinese commercial espionage following the arrest of three New York University researchers who are accused of accepting bribes to share secret research findings with Chinese government and industry entities. (The researchers were studying magnetic-resonance imaging technology on a National Institutes of Health-funded grant.) The article quotes a May report from The Commission on the Theft of American Intellectual Property, which states, “National industrial policy goals in China encourage IP theft, and an extraordinary number of Chinese in business and government entities are engaged in this practice.” The article also quotes China’s Commerce Ministry, which denies being weak on the enforcement of intellectual property rights. 

June 7, 2013

The California Federation of Teachers and other employee unions have filed a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education over the actions of a regional accreditor, the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges. The unions had previously lodged their concerns directly with the commission, which accredits California's two-year colleges and is an arm of the Western Association of Schools and Colleges. They alleged that the accreditor had acted improperly in slapping a severe sanction on City College of San Francisco -- which faces possible closure -- as well as in its oversight of other community colleges. The commission last week rejected those claims, saying it has followed procedures. So the unions this week asked the Education Department to force the commission to respond more fully to the complaint.

June 7, 2013

Leslie Berlowitz will remove herself from day-to-day activities at the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, which she leads, during investigations into how grant applications falsely described her as having a doctorate, The Boston Globe reported. The National Endowment for the Humanities is examining three grant applications that listed Berlowitz as having a doctorate. Now the Massachusetts attorney general is also investigating a range of issues, including Berlowitz's compensation package of $598,000.

June 7, 2013

WASHINGTON -- The National Advisory Committee on Institutional Quality and Integrity, a federal panel that meets twice a year to evaluate accreditors and recommend them for Education Department recognition, asked the American Bar Association on Thursday if it was doing more to ensure that law schools were providing good data on whether their graduates have found jobs. Those job-placement rates have been contentious in the past few years in a difficult job market for new lawyers; some graduates have sued their law schools for not providing good data. Representatives of the bar association said they were meeting with firms soon to consider an independent audit of job placement data, beginning with the class of 2014. About 15 institutions are currently not complying with the job placement disclosure requirements of the association's accrediting arm.

The panel voted to recommend that the Education Department renew its recognition of the A.B.A. for three years.

June 7, 2013

The student who was charged with violating conduct rules for speaking out about her rape and the way her allegations were handled at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has been exonerated, Chancellor Holden Thorp announced in a letter to campus Thursday.

The student-run Honor Court charged Gambill in February under an Honor Code provision prohibiting “disruptive or intimidating behavior” that affects someone’s education. Gambill responded by filing a federal complaint with the U.S. Education Department’s Office for Civil Rights. A couple of months later, OCR sent a letter to colleges warning them not to retaliate against students who make civil rights complaints with either an individual institution or the federal government. (An outside review, Thorp also said Thursday, found no evidence that UNC retaliated against Gambill.)

UNC is undergoing a broad review and revision of its sexual assault policies, after Gambill and others filed a separate OCR complaint in January alleging that the university underreports and mishandles sexual assaults. Thorp said all other student charges under the intimidation rule will also be thrown out, and no other charges will be brought under the provision until it is "adequately evaluated" by UNC’s Committee on Student Conduct.

“This action is not a challenge to the important role of students in our Honor System,” Thorp wrote, “but is intended to protect the free speech rights of our students.”
 

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