Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

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Thursday, December 15, 2011 - 3:00am

In the nine months after the Affordable Care Act raised from 19 to 25 the age through which dependents could be covered by their parents’ plan, about 2.5 million more young adults gained health insurance than would have been able to without the law, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services announced Wednesday. Of that age group, a population that is traditionally less likely than others to be insured, 64 percent were covered before President Obama’s health care overhaul legislation took effect in September 2010, and 73 percent were covered in June 2011. It is unclear how many of the newly insured are college students. HHS announced in January that 1 million 19- to 26-year-olds had gained insurance thanks to the legislation, meaning that the pace of new coverage slowed somewhat. The rise in coverage is clearly attributable to the Affordable Care Act, HHS said, because the percentage of adults age 26-35 with health insurance stayed stable at 72 percent.

Thursday, December 15, 2011 - 4:36am

The University of Vermont has suspended Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity over reports that it circulated a survey in which it asked members about their preferred rape victims, The Burlington Free Press reported. Fraternity members did not respond to requests for comment, but the national office of the fraternity said it was launching an investigation.

Thursday, December 15, 2011 - 3:00am

A day after campus outcry reported by Inside Higher Ed prompted Chancellor Timothy P. White to announce he would appoint and chair a task force to review and possibly revise a new set of extensive and unusual guidelines regulating protests at the University of California at Riverside, he do we know that it's "he", rather than the U? also, should we take a little credit for this? "after Inside Higher Ed reported..."? dl *** haha, I did think of that, but you're probably not terribly surprised that I didn't go for it... added. And in the letter he says that he ordered the removal of the document.  -ag removed the document altogether from the university’s policies and procedures web page. As of late Tuesday, nearly 900 people had signed a petition demanding the immediate removal of the guidelines (the petition is no longer active).

White essentially put a moratorium on the rules Wednesday; the document will still be reviewed by a group of students, faculty and staff in the New Year, but is not in effect in the interim. In a letter to the campus, White admitted that the guidelines were misdirected but also pointed out that he and Riverside have accommodated spontaneous demonstrations in the past, and suggested that some of the anger evident in the petition stemmed from misunderstanding. In interviews Tuesday and Wednesday, a university spokesman, James Grant, said the guidelines were never intended to apply to spontaneous protests, only to demonstrations and events capable of being planned the two weeks to a month in advance that the rules required.

“It is clear that the document does not accurately reflect UC Riverside’s demonstrated commitment to free expression and peaceful, non-violent protest. We were in error to post guidelines that neither comport with our values nor reflect the realities of how the campus exercises the right to free speech,” White wrote. “I regret any confusion and discontent caused by the document. The document and its posting were not worthy of this great university.”

Wednesday, December 14, 2011 - 3:00am

The State University of New York at Stony Brook is today announcing a $150 million gift from James and Marilyn Simons and the Simons Foundation. The gift is the largest ever to Stony Brook or any SUNY campus, and comes from donors who have already been generous to the university. James Simons has been a strong advocate for giving the SUNY system's research universities more autonomy and more control over their funds, and has said in the past that he would be motivated to give more if he saw movement in that direction. Shifts in the last year gave more authority over tuition revenue to the SUNY system. The $150 million gift will support medical research, new endowed professorships, and funds to recruit top undergraduate and graduate students.

Wednesday, December 14, 2011 - 4:36am

A new report from the College Board finds that progress toward increasing degree attainment in the United States has been minimal in recent years. The report, consistent with numerous other reports, suggests that -- barring major changes -- the United States will miss various goals set by the College Board and other groups for much higher levels of degree attainment. The College Board's goal is that by 2025, 55 percent of Americans between the ages of 25 and 34 would have an associate degree. The most recent data, the organization said, show that figure at 41.1 percent.

Wednesday, December 14, 2011 - 3:00am

Because expected state revenues did not materialize, the University of California and California State University systems must each cut an additional $100 million from their operating budgets, California Governor Jerry Brown announced Tuesday. The cuts come on top of $650 million each system had to cut after the budget was finalized this summer. The community college system, also facing new cuts, will probably increase tuition $10 per unit, starting with the summer 2012 session, on top of a $10 increase imposed this fall. In total, the cuts to higher education and other services will total about $1 billion.

The cuts are not entirely unexpected. When Brown signed the state budget in June, many said revenue projections were too optimistic. The Davis Enterprise quoted a University of California spokesman as saying that the system planned to absorb the additional cut and would not ask campuses to contribute.

Wednesday, December 14, 2011 - 4:38am

The Illinois prepaid tuition program is short by about 30 percent -- or nearly $560 million -- to meet the obligations it has made to families, The Chicago Tribune reported. The article is based on a new report by actuarial accountants. The state stopped selling new contracts in the program in September, but has yet to figure out how to meet the commitments the program has already made.

Wednesday, December 14, 2011 - 3:00am

Two of the men who say that they were molested as boys by Bernie Fine while he was associate head coach of the basketball team at Syracuse University on Tuesday announced a suit against the university and Jim Boeheim, the team's head coach, The Syracuse Post-Standard reported. The suit is not over the abuse, but for defamation, based on statements Boeheim made after the allegations became public in which the head coach expressed doubt about the reliability and motives of those coming forward. While Boeheim has since apologized, the men say that they were defamed. They are being represented by Gloria Allred, who is known for her advocacy for victims of sex crimes.

Wednesday, December 14, 2011 - 4:41am

A University of Oklahoma professor has been placed on paid administrative leave following his arrest on two charges of rape and one of lewd acts with a child, The Oklahoman reported. The faculty member, Dwain Pellebon, teaches social work and has been active in local groups that work with children in the juvenile justice system. He has not yet been formally charged in court. A lawyer for Pellebon told a local reporter that he denies all charges.

 

 

Wednesday, December 14, 2011 - 3:00am

Jerry Sandusky, whose alleged molestation of boys has created a mammoth scandal at Pennsylvania State University, applied and was rejected for a volunteer football coaching job at Juniata College in 2010, the Associated Press reported. The rejection followed a background check that turned up an investigation into his conduct at a high school where he had volunteered. All this occurred after he left his Penn State job, but before the allegations about him became public. Juniata officials said that, even after he was rejected, he showed up at football events, and that the athletics director had to tell all football officials that Sandusky could not play any role with the football program.

 

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