Higher Education Quick Takes

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Monday, November 7, 2011 - 3:00am

A female student at Frostburg State University died early Sunday after she was stabbed in the head by another female student in an off-campus residence, authorities said, The Washington Post reported. It is rare for students to be murdered, and killings by one female student of another are particularly rare. But this is the second incident this academic year at a Maryland public university in which one female student has been charged with killing another.

 

Monday, November 7, 2011 - 3:00am

New data from the World Economic Forum show that gender gaps in higher education leave some countries (including the United States and many other developed nations) with female enrollments significantly outpacing male enrollments, while other countries face the opposite situation. The female-to-male enrollment ratio is highest in Qatar (6.31 to 1), followed by Bahamas (2.70 to 1), Maldives (2.40 to 1), Jamaica (2.22 to 1) and Barbados (2.18 to 1). The United States ratio is 1.40 to 1. On the other end of the scale are (in order of lopsidedness) Chad, Gambia, Benin, Ethiopia and Nepal (which range from 0.17 female students to 1 male student, to 0.40 to 1). The full report (which examines gender gap issue on a variety of economic and societal statistics) may be found here. The data on postsecondary enrollments are in Appendix D, Table D9.

Monday, November 7, 2011 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Janet Angelis of the State University of New York at Albany examines the common actions and policies shared by high-performing schools. Find out more about the Academic Minute here.

Monday, November 7, 2011 - 3:00am

The vice chancellor (the equivalent of president) of the University of Queensland and his top deputy have announced plans to resign their positions amid a scandal over an admissions irregularity at the Australian institution. The official statement from the university praised both officials but said that they offered their resignations after an inquiry "confirmed an irregularity had occurred in the admission process for a student." While the statement said that no specific act of wrongdoing was attributed to the student or the senior officials, they still said that they would quit. The Australian reported that the student was a relative of Paul Greenfield, the vice chancellor who is resigning, and that this relative was admitted to a medical program. The newspaper also reported that a second investigation has started -- this one focusing on the admission to the dental school of the husband of an academic at the university.

 

Monday, November 7, 2011 - 3:00am

An Abilene Christian University bus crashed Friday, killing a student and injuring 15 other students and faculty members, the Associated Press reported. The group was traveling to do service work at a children's home. The driver was a faculty member who apparently lost control of the bus as it was entering a bend.

Monday, November 7, 2011 - 4:28am

The California State University System is facing a period of dramatic change in campus leadership, The Los Angeles Times reported. Five long-serving presidents have announced retirement plans. Charles B. Reed, chancellor of the system since 1998, said he couldn't remember a time when the system had as many presidential openings, and that there may be additional retirements within a year. The campuses where presidents have announced that they will retire are the Cal State institutions in Fullerton, Northridge, San Bernardino and San Francisco, and the California Maritime Academy.

 

Friday, November 4, 2011 - 3:00am

Administrators and faculty members at Cincinnati State Technical and Community College agreed to a new contract Thursday that was preceded by months of negotiations and a weeklong strike in September, the Middletown Journal reported. The trustees unanimously approved the new three-year collective bargaining agreement that will require faculty members to teach 36 workload units over two semesters, 20 percent more than the 30 hours they had originally asked for. The newspaper reported that faculty members will not receive a raise this year but will receive a 2.75 percent annual raise for the next three years. The new contract applies to 200 full-time faculty members.

Friday, November 4, 2011 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Vanderbilt University's Rangaraj Ramanujam uses fourth down plays to explain why and when businesses choose to go for it. Find out more about the Academic Minute here.

Friday, November 4, 2011 - 3:00am

Tullisse (Toni) Murdock announced Thursday that she will retire as chancellor of Antioch University at the end of the academic year. Murdock was praised by board leaders for her leadership in a time of many changes for the university, but her positions have frequently been controversial. Murdock was widely criticized by supporters of Antioch College after the university's decision to shut the college down (the college has since been revived but is no longer part of the university that grew around it). More recently, she has clashed with board members of the Los Angeles campus. In many of the controversies she has faced, Murdock has argued that she was making tough, necessary decisions -- while critics have said she was not sufficiently open to autonomy for various parts of the university system.

Friday, November 4, 2011 - 4:31am

Stanford University's Graduate School of Business is today announcing the creation of the Stanford Institute for Innovation in Developing Economies with a $150 million gift from Dorothy and Robert King. The institute will seek to stimulate, develop, and disseminate research and innovations that enable entrepreneurs, managers, and leaders to alleviate poverty in developing economies. The Kings have made a $100 million gift to fund the institute, and they will provide an additional $50 million in matching funds, with the goal of creating a $200 million fund for the new program.

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