Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

March 12, 2013

University College London is investigating reports that an event organized by the Islamic Education and Research Academy segregated the audience by gender, The Guardian reported. Students reported being told that women had to sit in the back, while spaces were provided up front for men, or for male-female couples.

March 12, 2013

Northwestern University announced Monday that it would cut the size of its entering class by 10 percent, while also adding 25 percent to spending on financial aid. While several other law schools have made such moves, amid declines in law school applications and a tough job market for graduates, Northwestern is among the more highly regarded law schools to announce such a shift. “We can’t ignore the destabilizing forces that the legal industry is facing today,” said Daniel Rodriguez, the law dean, in a statement.

 

March 12, 2013

Pennsylvania State University on Monday revealed details on the cost of the outside investigation it commissioned into the Jerry Sandusky scandal, including the cost ($8.1 million) paid to the law firm that produced what is known as the Freeh Report, The Centre Daily Times reported. Those expenses bring the total expenses to date for the scandal to $41 million.

 

March 12, 2013

In today’s Academic Minute, Rebecca Knickmeyer of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill explains how an infant’s brain can display signs of future neurological disorders. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.


 

March 12, 2013

Faculty members at Arcadia University were told Monday night that President Carl Oxholm III has left the position, after less than two years in office, The Philadelphia Daily News reported. An e-mail sent to professors gave no reason for the sudden departure. Several students said on Twitter that they were disappointed with the news.

March 11, 2013

Towson University announced Friday that it would eliminate its men's soccer and baseball teams, while reinstating men's tennis. The shifts are designed to help the university reduce its athletic deficit and comply with Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972. The Baltimore Business Journal reported that although 61 percent of Towson undergraduates are women, only about 52 percent of athletic slots go to women (some estimates of the women's share are higher, although still below the 61 percent figure). In 2012, the athletics department had a deficit of $1.36 million.

March 11, 2013

Four faculty members and one graduate student at the pharmacy college of Ohio State University have been accused either of research misconduct or misuse of grant funds, The Columbus Dispatch. In addition, one faculty member and one former faculty member are currently suing the pharmacy college. The dean of the college told the Dispatch that the institution is placing greater emphasis on research ethics, and is starting a course on the subject, and that the class will be required for students and "strongly urged" for faculty members.

 

March 11, 2013

When the board of Chicago State University announced last month that President Wayne Watson would be leaving his position, the board said that he had achieved key advances but that it was time for new leadership. On Friday, the board announced that Watson has violated a university policy and that the board is considering an appropriate punishment, The Chicago Tribune reported. The board did not specify the violation. Watson is saying that he is being forced out of office for not hiring friends of board leaders. Faculty leaders had opposed his hiring in the first place, and have been frustrated by his presidency.

March 11, 2013

An avalanche is coming to higher education, according to a new report by Sir Michael Barber, the chief education adviser at Pearson. The report, titled "An Avalanche Is Coming: Higher education and the revolution ahead,” is being released today by the Institute for Public Policy Research, a British think tank.

Barber and his two co-authors (who also work for Pearson) argue that governments across the world need to rethink how they regulate and fund higher education institutions amid a wave of new education providers, including massive open online classes. In a telephone interview from Ghana, Barber said university leaders need to think about what makes their institutions special and who they serve. “I think that kind of middle universities that have nothing special about them and don’t exhibit bold imaginative leadership will suffer,” Barber said.

Other economic thinkers, including analysts at Moody’s, are also warning colleges about changes. Pearson, though, calls global education "a once-in-a-generation opportunity.”

March 11, 2013

State universities in the United Arab Emirates should be barred from teaching most subjects in English and should be encouraged to add more Arabic language and literature courses, said members of the Federal National Council, The National reported. Hamad Al Rahoomi, a council member, said: "We want teaching to be in Arabic. We have doctors graduating from our universities who cannot fill out an application form in Arabic. The situation in government universities is going from bad to worse. We also need to enhance Arabic in private universities."

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