Higher Education Quick Takes

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Wednesday, August 17, 2011 - 3:00am

Bloomberg has published a detailed analysis of athletic spending at Rutgers University, which the news service found to have spent more on athletics than any other public university, with 40 percent of the funds coming from student fees and the university's general fund, at a time of deep budget cuts to academic programs. The story contrasts academic cuts -- a salary freeze for professors, faculty members having to pay for some journals themselves -- with the university's subsidies for sports. Each year the football coach, Greg Schiano, stays on, the university forgives $100,000 of a no-interest home loan it made to him. Schiano is paid $2.03 million a year. The average associate professor earns less than the amount his home loan is reduced each year.

Wednesday, August 17, 2011 - 3:00am

A convicted felon serving a 20-year sentence for securities fraud and money laundering has, in 100 hours of interviews with Yahoo Sports, laid out allegations of massive violations of National Collegiate Athletic Association rules in the sports program at the University of Miami. An 11-month investigation by the news site includes charges by Nevin Shapiro (and backed by others) that the former Miami booster gave many thousands of dollars in cash and other gifts to dozens of athletes, improperly recruited players to the university, and illegally paid Miami coaches, too. According to Yahoo Sports, Shapiro has shared many of the allegations (and evidence) with federal prosecutors and the NCAA. Miami officials told the website that they took the charges seriously.

Wednesday, August 17, 2011 - 3:00am

Professors at West Virginia State University voted Tuesday, 67 to 15, that they have no confidence in President Hazo Carter, The Charleston Daily Mail reported. Carter has been president since 1987. Faculty members cited a lack of leadership, of responsiveness, and of good financial plans as reasons for their vote. The university hired a fund-raising consultant last year to plan for a campaign to raise $25.5 million, but learned that many would-be donors had major criticisms of the university and were not willing to donate large sums. In an interview with the Daily Mail, Carter said that the frustrations grew out of his long tenure as president. "What happens is that when a person is in one place for a long time, the longer you're someplace, the more often you have an opportunity to make decisions that some people don't like," he said. "Of course, that's fine, because that's what management is all about."

Wednesday, August 17, 2011 - 3:00am

James Hupp has resigned as dean of a new dental school at East Carolina University, but will remain on the faculty, after a state audit criticized his travel expenses, The News & Observer of Raleigh, N.C., reported. The audit questioned "extensive" travel by administrators as the dental school -- which is about to start classes -- was created. In the United States, officials traveled to Kiawah Island, S.C., and Destin, Fla. There were also international trips to Germany and Switzerland.

Tuesday, August 16, 2011 - 3:00am

Governor Dannel P. Malloy met Monday with leaders of Connecticut's private colleges, and heard their complaints of over-regulation by the state, The Hartford Courant reported. College leaders complained that some regulation takes too long (disputed by some state officials) and that it is inconsistent. Four colleges in the state -- Connecticut and Trinity Colleges, and Wesleyan and Yale Universities -- are exempt from state requirements that new programs at private colleges be approved. Malloy said he was sympathetic to the complaints, but couldn't argue for eliminating all regulation. "We over-regulate, I have to agree with you," he said. But he added: "I'm not saying there shouldn't be some basic review. I'm not a no-review guy."

Tuesday, August 16, 2011 - 3:00am

The University of Tokyo is considering a shift in its academic year, from the current system of starting in the spring to instead starting in the fall, The Mainichi Daily News reported. The move is being considered in part to better align the university with those of many other nations, potentially encouraging more collaboration. If the University of Tokyo makes the shift from the traditional schedule of Japanese universities, many others are expected to follow.

Tuesday, August 16, 2011 - 3:00am

The American Bar Association has imposed a public censure on the law school of Villanova University over its past practice of reporting inaccurate grades and LSAT scores of incoming students in an apparent bid to improve its standing in the rankings, The ABA Journal reported. The sanctions could have been worse, up to removing Villanova from the list of ABA-approved law schools. But the ABA settled for a public censure because the law school determined who was involved in the deception, and none of those people are still employed there.

Tuesday, August 16, 2011 - 3:00am

The University of Texas Investment Management Company, which manages one of the largest university endowments, is increasing its use of derivatives as a hedge against an economic crisis that could seriously hit the fund, Bloomberg reported. Officials are worried about such possibilities as a massive European default or a collapse of the dollar.

Tuesday, August 16, 2011 - 3:00am

North Dakota may finally be ready to cave on the "Fighting Sioux" name and imagery for athletic teams of the University of North Dakota. A new state law required the university to maintain the name, regardless of sanctions from the National Collegiate Athletic Association. But NCAA officials have now made clear they won't budge, and North Dakota doesn't want the sanctions, such as being unable to host postseason competition. North Dakota's Board of Higher Education voted Monday to retire the name, and state legislation is expected to follow later this year, the Associated Press reported.

Tuesday, August 16, 2011 - 3:00am

A three-year fund-raising campaign has produced a permanent scholarship fund of $67.7 million at the Foundation for California Community Colleges. That is enough money to support 3,400 students a year.

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