Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

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Tuesday, September 6, 2011 - 3:00am

University of New Mexico officials thought they had a plan to save about $70,000 by eliminating the job of a vice provost (at a salary of $192,000), and replacing him with three part-time administrators. But The Albuquerque Journal reported that officials brought on the part-timers before they realized that the vice provost already had been given (and had signed) a contract for the year. So now the university has the vice provost (being assigned new duties) and the three part-time administrators on payroll.

Tuesday, September 6, 2011 - 3:00am

University of New Mexico officials thought they had a plan to save about $70,000 by eliminating the job of a vice provost (at a salary of $192,000), and replacing him with three part-time administrators. But The Albuquerque Journal reported that officials brought on the part-timers before they realized that the vice provost already had been given (and had signed) a contract for the year. So now the university has the vice provost (being assigned new duties) and the three part-time administrators on payroll.

Tuesday, September 6, 2011 - 3:00am

New Zealand's University of Auckland is rejecting calls that it fire Margaret Mutu, head of the Maori studies department, over controversial statements she recently made. Mutu called for the country to limit immigration by white people, saying that they bring "an attitude of white supremacy" that hurts people from indigenous groups. News 3 New Zealand reported that Stuart McCutcheon, the vice chancellor, issued a statement focused on academic freedom. "The vice-chancellor understands the concerns raised ... but believes very strongly in the right of academics to comment on issues in which they have expertise, even when those comments may be controversial," he said.

Tuesday, September 6, 2011 - 3:00am

The Education Department is taking its leaders on the road for a back-to-school bus tour focusing on education and the economy. Martha Kanter, the under secretary of education, will spend today at Monroe Community College, in Rochester, N.Y., discussing public-private partnerships and "cradle-to-career" education reform. Other department officials, including Education Secretary Arne Duncan, are touring Pennsylvania, Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, Wisconsin and Illinois as part of the bus tour, the department's second such effort. Last year's trip focused on the South and the Northeast.

Tuesday, September 6, 2011 - 3:00am

The board of the University of Central Arkansas voted Friday to buy out the contract of Allen Meadors, who has been president since July 2009. The board voted the day after Meadors apologized to the board for not fully briefing members that a $700,000 "gift" from Aramark to renovate the president's home was linked to a contract for the company to provide food services at the university.

Tuesday, September 6, 2011 - 3:00am

National Louis University is offering a tuition discount on a course through the popular website Groupon, The Chicago Tribune reported. The three-credit graduate course in education normally would have a tuition rate of $2,232. Groupon will offer it for $950. A spokeswoman for Groupon said this was the first time a college had used Groupon to attract students with a discount.

Tuesday, September 6, 2011 - 3:00am

Dalhousie University, in Canada, has decided to end use of Turnitin, saying that it was unhappy that student papers were being stored by the plagiarism detection service on servers in the United States, The Toronto Star reported. Student groups have long complained about the use of plagiarism detection software, but many faculty members are upset by the decision, saying that they lack a new system as the fall semester is starting.

Friday, September 2, 2011 - 3:00am

Stephen Kinzey, an associate professor of kinesiology at California State University at San Bernardino, is a fugitive as authorities seek to press charges related to allegations that he led a group called the Devils Diciples (sic), a motorcycle gang that sold methamphetamine, The Los Angeles Times reported. Sheriff Rod Hoops announced the search for Kinzey at a press conference, saying: “It’s alarming to me -- I have kids in college." Albert Karnig, president of the university, issued a statement in which he said that Cal State was unaware of the allegations until they were announced. "If the allegations are indeed true, this is beyond disappointing," he said.

Kinzey's Twitter feed indicated that on Wednesday and Thursday, he may have been late for class.

Friday, September 2, 2011 - 3:00am

Harvard University has upped to $65,000 the family income level at which students will not need to pay anything to attend the institution. In 2004, Harvard revamped its aid program, and said that students with family income below $40,000 would not need to pay anything. That figure was increased two years later to $60,000.

Friday, September 2, 2011 - 3:00am

Julius Nyang'oro has resigned as chair of the Department of African and Afro-American Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, but will remain on the faculty, amid reports of possible links between Nyang'oro and a football scandal, reported The News & Observer of Raleigh, N.C. The resignation followed reports in the News & Observer that Nyang'oro had hired a sports agent to teach a summer class this year without telling his dean about the agent's field of work.

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