Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

May 8, 2013

Overall rates of gambling among male college athletes decreased from 66 percent in 2008 to 57 percent in 2012, according to a new National Collegiate Athletic Association study, despite a “noticeable increase” in the number of sports wagering cases investigated by the NCAA. Gambling by female athletes stayed constant, though at the significantly lower rate of 39 percent. However, the survey of 23,000 athletes also found that male athletes are still betting and wagering more on sports than they were in 2004, the first year the NCAA published this study. In 2004, 23.5 percent of male athletes said they bet money on sports in the last year, compared to 25.7 percent in 2012. Rates of gambling for money by men also rise by division; in 2012, from 50 percent in Division I, to 56 percent in Division II, to 65 percent in Division III. And more male athletes wagered something on sports in 2012 -- 18.7 percent in Division I, 25.9 percent in Division II and 31.9 percent in Division III. In 2008, those figures were 17.1, 20.6, and 30.7 percent, respectively. allie -- is difference b/w next sentence and previous sentence that it is betting money on ANYTHING, where lower rates in previous sentence are betting on sports? can we make that slightly clearer? distinction was lost on me first read through ... dl *** rearranged some stuff here. Wagering is betting anything; betting is betting money. -ag

May 8, 2013

Higher One, a company best known for streamlining the process by which colleges channel federal aid funds to students, said Tuesday that it has agreed to purchase the Campus Solutions arm of Sallie Mae that two years ago sought to compete with it. Higher One valued the purchase of the Sallie Mae business -- which works with campus business offices on billing payment solutions, refund disbursement services, and tuition payment plan administration -- at $47.25 million. Higher One has been growing; last year it bought Campus Labs, a student affairs analytics company.

May 8, 2013

Many faculty members and students are expressing outrage at the Sigma Chi fraternity at Willamette University after a blog posted information about what fraternity brothers were posting on what they thought was a private Facebook page, The Statesman Journal reported. One post called for a female administrator to be kicked in the genitals. Another post discussed the need to "beat" a female student. Another said that "women's rights are the biggest joke in the U.S." On Monday, some students protested, while local police responded to reports of a car's tire being slashed on the campus. Stephen Thorsett, the president, sent an e-mail to the campus denouncing the tire slashing and the Facebook posts.

 

May 8, 2013

In today’s Academic Minute, JeffriAnne Wilder of the University of North Florida explains the continued existence of colorism and skin tone bias within minority communities. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

 

May 7, 2013

Montana Governor Steve Bullock, a Democrat, has vetoed legislation that would have allowed students with a permit to carry concealed weapons on campus, the Associated Press reported. The bill also would have allowed students -- with their roommate's permission -- to keep guns in dormitory rooms. Higher education officials lobbied against the bill, arguing that it would endanger students, not protect them. Currently Montana allows students to keep hunting weapons on campus, but they are kept in special lockers where students can get them when they want to go hunting.

 

May 7, 2013

The Scholars at Risk network has welcomed the acquittal of Habib Kazdaghli, a dean at the University of Manouba, in Tunisia, who was accused of slapping one of two veiled students who entered his office without permission. The incident was part of a broader dispute involving conservative Muslims about the university’s prohibition on students veiling their faces in the classroom.

The Associated Press reported that the two students in question were convicted of damaging property in the dean’s office. The dean, Kazdaghli, has maintained that he was defending himself against the students’ affront. 

May 7, 2013

James F. Jones Jr. announced Monday that he will retire next year -- a year earlier than planned -- as president of Trinity College in Connecticut, The Hartford Courant reported. Jones has been under sustained criticism from many alumni since last year, when he announced that all fraternities and sororities would be forced to become coeducational. College officials characterized the retirement decision as unrelated to the Greek uproar, but the Courant reported that many alumni critics are dubious, given the extent of anger over the Greek decision.

May 7, 2013

University of Southern California students are alleging that the more than 70 Los Angeles Police Department officers who responded to a noise complaint and broke up a house party early Sunday morning engaged in racial profiling, The Daily Trojan reported. While police came in with riot gear and batons, those students said, a large house party attended primarily by white students remained undisturbed. Police say some of the 400-or-so students – most of whom were black or Latino, and six of whom were arrested – became aggressive and threw bottles at them, which students denied. One student who attended the celebratory graduation party posted a petition afterward titled “Stop Racial Profiling at USC!”, which had gathered nearly 2,000 signatures as of early Monday evening. The television station KTLA reported that LAPD will investigate the allegation internally.

May 7, 2013

Syracuse University has decided to leave the Big East Conference for the Atlantic Coast Conference, which has large payout for members. But Syracuse is bound by its contract with the Big East to pay a $7.5 million exit fee. The university is planning to allocate that bill across the institution, arguing that all parts will benefit from the eventual greater revenues from the ACC. But The Syracuse Post-Standard reported that both student and faculty groups are asking why the athletics department shouldn't pay the $7.5 million, and spare other departments cuts. A petition says: "In light of the fact that the Athletic Department is expected to receive an annual increase from the ACC in excess of $10 million per year, we endorse the resolution of the University Senate and Senate Budget Committee recommending that the $7.5 million Big East exit fee be paid fully by the Athletic Department and not out of student tuition."

May 7, 2013

Some legislators and civil liberties groups are asking why Governor Chris Christie's administration in New Jersey is planning to award $10.6 million in funds from a voter approved bond issue for college facilities to Beth Medrash Govoha, an all-male, orthodox rabbinical seminary, The Star-Ledger reported. The article notes increasingly close ties between the college's leaders and the Christie administration. The bond vote explicitly included private colleges, and many private colleges in New Jersey have religious affiliations. Critics say that Beth Medrash Govoha -- unlike the Roman Catholic colleges in New Jersey -- appears to have religious tests for admission. College officials deny any religious tests. But critics say that requirements -- such as knowing Hebrew, knowing sacred Jewish texts and agreeing not to date for the first six months enrolled -- suggest a strong religious orientation for all students.

 

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