Higher Education Quick Takes

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Friday, August 26, 2011 - 3:00am

Prime Minister Vladimir Putin on Wednesday said that Russia, having invested more money in universities, needs to modernize them, RIA Novosti reported. "Now that we've laid the foundation, our next steps should be aimed at modernizing the entire network of higher education institutions in Russia, to make it so that the honorable title of university, academy or institute indeed mean in practice modern quality and ample education, contemporary education," Putin told the leaders of Russian universities.

Friday, August 26, 2011 - 3:00am

Gaston Caperton's compensation package at the College Board in 2009 was $1.3 million, triple what he earned in 1999, Bloomberg reported. The article noted that Caperton earns more than the presidents of most colleges and universities. The article also noted other well paid officials associated with the (nonprofit) testing industry. For instance, both ACT and the Educational Testing Service pay board members, an unusual practice for nonprofit organizations.

Friday, August 26, 2011 - 3:00am

A Pew Hispanic Center analysis of Census Bureau data has found that Hispanic enrollments in higher education increased by 24 percent from 2009 to 2010. During that year, the number of Hispanic young adults enrolled in college grew by 349,000, compared with an increase of 88,000 young blacks and 43,000 young Asian Americans and a decrease of 320,000 young non-Hispanic whites. With these combined shifts, Latino enrollment would be larger than black enrollment.

Friday, August 26, 2011 - 3:00am

The faculty union at Youngstown State University, after indicating Thursday evening that a strike could start today, announced it would not go on strike today, The Youngstown Vindicator reported. The union and the university remain divided on a new contract.

Friday, August 26, 2011 - 3:00am

The University of Utah will have its debut in the Pac-12 in a home game on Thursday evening, Sept. 1. Fearing transportation difficulties, the university has canceled classes that afternoon and evening. Some faculty members, The Salt Lake Tribune reported, aren't happy. "I don’t like the message it sends," said Jay Jordan, an assistant professor of English. "We are going to use the academic schedule to accommodate football."

Thursday, August 25, 2011 - 3:00am

The National Collegiate Athletic Association came down hard Wednesday on Bruce Pearl, the former University of Tennessee men's basketball coach, but imposed no penalties on the other high-profile coach ensnared in the university's rule-breaking case, Lane Kiffin, now at the University of Southern California. (It hardly held up Kiffin as a paragon of virtue, however.) The association's Division I Committee on Infractions said Wednesday that it had concluded that the university had failed to monitor its men's basketball program, which under Pearl engaged in an array of recruiting and other violations of NCAA rules.

The infractions panel said it would largely embrace a set of penalties that Tennessee had earlier imposed on itself, adding only a two-year probation. But the committee said it would require any college that hires Pearl by 2014 to show why it should not have to impose a severe set of limitations on his duties, given that his most serious rule breaking involved misleading NCAA investigators and encouraging other parties in the case to do the same. Three of Pearl's former assistants received similar "show cause" orders.

The committee also found that the Tennessee football program broke numerous "secondary" rules during Kiffin's one-year stint there in 2009, but that they did not rise to a level requiring penalties against the coach. But while Kiffin and officials at USC told reporters that they were pleased that he would avoid sanctions, the infractions panel did not have kind words for him. His time there was "not a record of which to be proud," the panel said.

Thursday, August 25, 2011 - 3:00am

A law professor who is 73 has sued the University of Pittsburgh, charging that he was passed over for a tenure-track opening because of his age. The university declined to comment, but The National Law Journal noted that Pitt is the fourth law school recently hit with an age discrimination suit. The others are at Michigan State University, University of Baltimore and University of Iowa.

Thursday, August 25, 2011 - 3:00am

Academic Search Inc., a prominent higher education leadership search firm, has appointed Jessica S. Kozloff as its new president. Kozloff, a senior consultant with the firm since 2008 and former president of Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania, takes over leadership at an important moment for the firm. Academic Search recently lost its president and several consultants, many of whom went to AGB Search.

Academic Search has also recently hired eight new consultants: Jacqueline Powers Doud, former president of Mount St. Mary’s College in California; Ed Ericson, chief academic officer at John Brown University; Marie V. McDemmond, former president of Norfolk State University; Marilyn Rhoads Mock, a consultant for Marts & Lundy and GDA Integrated Services; Allen Mori, former provost and vice president for academic affairs at California State University at Dominguez Hills; Molly Easo Smith, former president of Manhattanville College; Ramon S. Torrecilha, former executive vice president at Mills College; and Don Zingale, former president of the State University of New York at Cobleskill.

Thursday, August 25, 2011 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Carl Cranor of the University of California at Riverside reveals how easily the unborn are exposed to environmental toxins and describes the medical consequences such exposure brings as children grow into adults. Find out more about the Academic Minute here.

Thursday, August 25, 2011 - 3:00am

What's it like at a California public university after so many rounds of budget cuts? At San Francisco State University, enrollment over the last five years has stayed relatively constant at just under 30,000, but the same number of students must make do with 16 percent fewer instructors -- a decline of 61 tenured or tenure-track faculty members and 216 lecturers, according to The San Francisco Chronicle. The article describes a professor holding a lottery to figure out who can get the last few spots in a class, and a physical plant so behind on repairs that people must wear hats and gloves in class for a few weeks in winter as the boilers slowly heat up.

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