Higher Education Quick Takes

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Monday, October 3, 2011 - 3:00am

The nation's educators must work to improve college completion rates for Latino students if the United States is to remain economically competitive in the world, according to a report released Friday by the College Board. While Latinos make up the fastest growing group of students in the nation, they are behind the national average for college completion by more than half. At present, 19.2 percent of Latinos who enter college complete college, while the national average hovers around 40 percent, according to the report.

Gaston Caperton, president of the College Board, said the report is a "call to action." “Our nation will not become No. 1 again in college completion unless we commit ourselves to giving these students the support they need to achieve their full potential,” Caperton said.

To attain better completion rates for Latino students, the report recommends making voluntary preschool education available to low-income students, improving middle and high school counseling and simplifying the financial aid system, among other things.

Monday, October 3, 2011 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Robert Thacker of St. Lawrence University explains Canada’s role as the
second largest supplier of oil used in the United States. Find out more about the Academic Minute here.

Monday, October 3, 2011 - 3:00am

The National Collegiate Athletic Association last week punished the University of Cincinnati for violations in its women's basketball and football programs. The violations, which the university uncovered and investigated, involved improper telephone calls to recruits by coaches in the two sports, with the vast majority made by a former women's basketball coach. Penalties include restrictions on recruiting and coaching duties.

Monday, October 3, 2011 - 3:00am

The 2011 winner of the Nobel Prize in Medicine will be announced this morning. This item will be updated as soon as information is available.

Monday, October 3, 2011 - 3:00am

The nation's education leaders must work to improve college completion rates for Latino students if it is to stay competitive on the world state, according to a report compiled by College Board. While Latinos make up the fastest growing group of students in the nation, they are behind the national average for college completion by nearly half. At present, 19.2 percent of Latinos complete college, while the national average hovers around 40 percent, according to the report. At a conference in Miami on Friday, College Board unveiled its report and action plan to improve educational attainment for Latinos.

Gaston Caperton, president of the College Board, said the report is a "call to action." “Our nation will not become number one again in college completion unless we commit ourselves to giving these students the support they need to achieve their full potential,” Caperton said.

The report is one step in ensuring College Board's goal of increasing completion of associate's degree or higher to 55 percent by 2025.

"There is work to be done to ensure every student, regardless of background, zip code or parents’ salary level, is equipped with the knowledge and skills to succeed in today’s global economy," said Jeb Bush, former governor of Florida and chairman of the Foundation of Excellence in Education.

To attain better completion rates for Latino students, the report recommends voluntary preschool education that is available to low-income students, improving middle and high school counseling and simplifying the financial aid system, among other things.

Friday, September 30, 2011 - 3:00am

The former chancellor of City College of San Francisco pleaded guilty last week to charges that he made illegal campaign donations to try to win support for bonds for the institution, the San Francisco Chronicle reported. Philip R. Day Jr., who stepped down as president of the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators in 2009 after the charges against him became public, agreed to pay $30,000 in fines to resolve the allegations, the newspaper reported.

Friday, September 30, 2011 - 3:00am

Officials involved in running the SAT program have called this week's arrest of an Emory University student on charges that he took the exam, for pay, for six Long Island high school students an isolated incident. But The New York Times reported that some prosecutors and others see a broader problem. The prosecutor said that she is investigating two other high schools and other test-takers, and that she believes the problem is "systemic." School officials said that they agreed.

Friday, September 30, 2011 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, A.G. Rud of Washington State University examines the philosophy
behind the well-known, and not so well-known, actions of Albert Schweitzer. Find out more about the Academic Minute here.

Friday, September 30, 2011 - 3:00am

Three Latino voters have sued the Cerritos Community College District's system for electing board members because it limits the influence of Latino citizens, the Associated Press reported. The district, which is more than 50 percent Latino, uses an at-large voting system. The seven-member board currently lacks a Latino member and has not had more than one Latino board member since 2003. College officials said that the board is in fact considering a shift to district voting.

Friday, September 30, 2011 - 3:00am

The University of New Hampshire will continue to sell energy drinks, after all. The university had announced in a Monday morning press release that it would stop selling the beverages in its convenience stores and vending machines in January, but then backtracked with an evening release saying that President Mark Huddleston had suspended the ban indefinitely. He'd seen "conflicting evidence" regarding the drinks' health effects, he said, and wanted to involve students in the decision. Another press release sent out Thursday afternoon said Huddleston had nixed the ban completely. He announced the decision to students via his Twitter feed, saying, "After review, UNH will NOT ban the sale of energy drinks. We want students to make their own choices, and be smart and informed consumers."

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