Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

Subscribe to Inside Higher Ed | Quick Takes
Wednesday, August 31, 2011 - 3:00am

The father of a Frostburg State University football player said doctors had told him that his son died from “severe head trauma,” The New York Times reported Tuesday. While the NCAA and Ivy League have recently ramped up safety precautions to treat concussions properly or avoid them altogether, death by head trauma is extremely rare in college sports; it is most common among youth and high school football players. According to the University of North Carolina’s Center for Catastrophic Sport Injury Research, from 1982 through 2010, 113 high school football players died from injuries that resulted in a brain or spinal cord injury or skull or spinal fracture -- while at the college level, nine died. The most recent death was in 2002-3. The Times report noted that “a different cause of death could be identified as facts of his case emerge.”

Wednesday, August 31, 2011 - 3:00am

The National Collegiate Athletic Association on Tuesday reinstated eight football players whom the University of Miami had declared ineligible last week after news broke that they got improper benefits from a booster, but the association required most of them to sit out games and to repay the value of the goods they received. The players include Miami’s quarterback, who must sit out the season opener next week. The athlete who will sit out the most games -- six -- received more than $1,200 in benefits, the NCAA said. The benefits included food, transportation and nightclub cover charges. In addition to those eight, five other players who were implicated in the investigation have been cleared to participate, but one was suspended indefinitely. Miami responded to the news with its own statement saying it "will be more vigilant" when it comes to compliance.

The university itself is still under a separate investigation (through the NCAA's enforcement process, as opposed to its system for determining player eligibility) into whether officials knew about the scandal. Tuesday's announcement about eligibility decisions includes some language that could suggest trouble ahead for Miami: in several cases it notes that players received money or gifts not only from the booster, Nevin Shapiro, but from "athletics personnel," suggesting that the NCAA has concluded that university employees participated in the wrongdoing.

Tuesday, August 30, 2011 - 3:00am

It's rankings season, and that means everyone is rushing out lists of best college for this and best college for that, all leading up to next month's annual celebration by colleges that fare well in U.S. News & World Report's rankings, and denunciation of the magazine by those that do poorly (and a few principled colleges that did well). Gawker responded to this rankings frenzy Monday by releasing a list of the "25 most unranked colleges in America." The website had a problem though when it found out one of the colleges on its list, the Thunderbird School of Global Management, is in fact ranked (just check out its website), and so subbed in another college.

Tuesday, August 30, 2011 - 3:00am

Hilary Pennington wrote to recipients of education-related grants from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to announce that she would be leaving the position of director of education, postsecondary success and special initiatives. The foundation has been highly influential in recent years in pushing colleges to pay more attention to college completion issues, and this focus has been most notable at community colleges. "Given the momentum we’ve built for the next phase of the postsecondary success strategy, I have decided this is a good time for me to pass the baton. I am eager to get closer to work on the ground than my role at the foundation allows, and to replenish my energy and spirit. And I want to engage more directly the challenges that face societies (the U.S. and elsewhere in the world) seeking to balance the needs of a rising generation of ethnically and racially diverse young people with those of a more homogeneous aging generation –- especially now, at a time when slower economic growth often seems to pit the interests of the young against those of the old." Pennington did not announce details on her next steps, but said she would remain on for a transition period into 2012.

Tuesday, August 30, 2011 - 3:00am

Under a new agreement between Pearson and the Eminata Group, students at three for-profit colleges in Canada will begin getting their course content exclusively via Apple iPads, the companies announced on Monday. Beginning in September, all new students enrolled at CDI College, Vancouver Career College and Reeves College will get iPads from Eminata, which operates the colleges, and will buy e-textbooks from Pearson. Over the next three years, all programs at the colleges will deliver their course content via Pearson's iPad-optimized e-texts.

Tuesday, August 30, 2011 - 3:00am

Sprint has sued Blackboard, claiming that the latter company isn't living up to its end of a deal in which Sprint thought it would have advantages in marketing the use of Blackboard learning management systems on smartphones, Seeking Alpha reported. (Seeking Alpha is a news service focused on stock and business trends.) Blackboard disputes Sprint's assertions. Mobile use of Blackboard services is popular with students and has been a growth area for the company.

Tuesday, August 30, 2011 - 3:00am

A former graduate student has sued Webster University, arguing that he was unfairly dismissed from a master's program in counseling for his lack of empathy, The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reported. The suit also alleges that he may have been punished for criticizing the program. The student says that his grades were good, and that he was not given a chance to improve when questions were raised about his ability during work in the field to show empathy. The university declined to comment on the case.

Tuesday, August 30, 2011 - 3:00am

This month saw one of the more unusual college firings in recent years, with an order of nuns dismissing the president and the board of Our Lady of Holy Cross College, in Louisiana. In his first interview since the dismissal, the Rev. Anthony De Conciliis, the ousted president, said he was given no reason for the dismissal, that he had received good reviews, and that he still doesn't know why he and the board members were fired, The New Orleans Times-Picayune reported. Myles Seghers, the interim president, said in a statement that he also couldn't explain the dismissal.

Tuesday, August 30, 2011 - 3:00am

U.S. Public Health Service experiments in the 1940s in which people in Guatemala were infected with sexually transmitted diseases -- without their consent -- are not only ethically reprehensible by today's standards, but violated standards of the time, according to a statement issued Monday by the U.S. Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues. President Obama charged the commission with studying what happened in Guatemala decades ago, and to follow up with a report (still to come) to make sure appropriate ethical standards are being followed today. As to the historical report, the commission found that a similar study was conducted by many of the same researchers in a prison in Indiana, before the Guatemala work. But in Indiana, the prisoners were given a full briefing and gave informed consent. “This finding goes a long way to helping the commission answer the question about whether ethics rules of the time were violated,” said a statement from Amy Gutmann, chair of the commission and president of the University of Pennsylvania.

Gutmann said that the commission's work was important to honor the victims in Guatemala and to help legitimate research today. "Research with human subjects is a sacred trust. Without public confidence, participation will decline and critical research will be stopped. It is imperative that we get this right," she said.

Tuesday, August 30, 2011 - 3:00am

In today's Academic Minute, Brandt Kronholm of St. Mary’s College of Maryland explains Partition Theory, and uses some very large numbers in doing so. Find out more about the Academic Minute here.

Pages

Search for Jobs

Back to Top