Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

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Monday, October 8, 2012 - 3:00am

Cardale Jones, a third-string quarterback at Ohio State University, tweeted on Friday that athletes shouldn't need to attend class, ESPN reported. "Why should we have to go to class if we came here to play FOOTBALL, we ain't come to play SCHOOL classes are POINTLESS," he wrote. Once media organizations noticed and started to write about the tweet, it was removed, as was the entire Twitter account of Jones. The university suspended Jones for one game as a result of the tweet.

Monday, October 8, 2012 - 3:00am

A campus security guard wasn't sure "security guard" is same as police, so changed hed. dl at the University of South Alabama early on Saturday shot and killed a freshman who the university said was charging the officer outside the police station on campus. According to a statement from the university, the officer went outside after hearing banging on a window and was repeatedly charged by the student, who was naked. The officer fired only after repeated requests that the student calm down were ignored, the statement said. The student was identified as Gilbert Thomas Collar, an 18-year-old freshman. The university has asked the local district attorney to investigate what happened. Collar's mother told NBC News that she did not understand why non-lethal force could not have been used to subdue her son, who she said was 5 foot 7 inches tall and weighed 135 pounds. "He was wearing no clothes and he was obviously not in his right mind," said Bonnie Collar. "Obviously he was not armed. He was completely naked."

Monday, October 8, 2012 - 3:00am

John B. Gurdon of the University of Cambridge and Shinya Yamanaka of Kyoto University were this morning named joint winners of the 2012 Nobel Prize in Medicine "for the discovery that mature cells can be reprogrammed to become pluripotent." Yamanaka is also affiliated with the Gladstone Institutes, in San Francisco.

 

 

Monday, October 8, 2012 - 3:00am

Clair Willcox was named Friday to his former job as editor-in-chief of the University of Missouri Press, The Columbia Missourian reported. In recent months, the press was slated for elimination and Willcox was laid off. When the press survived, supporters said that they would not be satisfied until Willcox's job was restored.

Monday, October 8, 2012 - 3:00am

The University of Tokyo, Japan's most prestigious university, is starting its first four-year undergraduate degree in English, The New York Times reported. Officials said that they want to attract more international students to the university, and that they want to expand their pool beyond countries such as South Korea and China where many people become fluent in Japanese. The inaugural class includes students from Australia, Britain, Finland, Poland, the United States and Vietnam.

Monday, October 8, 2012 - 3:00am

Many students at Cuyahoga Community College are objecting to the decision of the college's Metro campus to refuse to let Maria Graciani continue her job as an "ambassador" -- in which she helped with orientation, campus tours and other activities -- because 16 years ago she was convicted of aggravated assault, The Plain Dealer of Cleveland reported. Graciani has served in the position successfully in the past, but the college recently started doing background checks on those in such jobs, and denied her the chance to continue as an ambassador this year. While college officials declined to talk about the decision, they have said that that they introduced the background checks to protect the safety of everyone on campus. Graciani's conviction stems from charges that, during a brawl, she hit a woman with a beer bottle. She said in an interview with the newspaper that someone else hit the woman, but that she pleaded guilty to avoid prison.

Monday, October 8, 2012 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Keith Ashley of the University of North Florida reveals what life was like for Native Americans at the earliest Spanish missions. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

Monday, October 8, 2012 - 3:00am

The University of Texas at Austin has announced a pilot program to test the idea of linking loan forgiveness to progress made by undergraduates toward graduation. Under the program, the university will select 200 undergraduates who receive federal unsubsidized student loans. If they complete 15 credits in a semester, the university will repay $1,000 in principal, plus accrued interest.

 

Monday, October 8, 2012 - 3:00am

A video has surfaced in which Representative Paul Broun, a Georgia Republican who chairs the House Science Subcommittee on Investigations and Oversight, blasts widely accepted scientific theories, The Athens Banner-Herald reported. In the video address to a church, Representative Broun said that the Bible contains the literal truth about all matters, and that those who think otherwise are wrong. "God’s word is true. I’ve come to understand that. All that stuff I was taught about evolution, embryology, the big bang theory; all of that is lies straight from the pit of hell," Broun said. "And it’s lies to keep me and all the folks who are taught that from understanding that they need a savior. You see, there’s a lot of scientific data that I’ve found as a scientist that this really is a young earth. I don’t believe that the earth is but about 9,000 years old. I believe it was made in six days as we know them. That’s what the Bible tells us."

Broun is running unopposed for re-election.

A spokeswoman for him said that Broun "was speaking off the record to a large church group about his personal beliefs regarding religious issues."

Monday, October 8, 2012 - 3:00am

Emory University is formally acknowledging and apologizing for the first time for the anti-Jewish actions, many years ago, of its dental school, The New York Times reported. When the late John E. Buhler was dean, from 1948 to 1961, 65 percent of Jewish students were either failed or forced to repeat entire years of classes. During that time, the dental school had an application system asking students to identify as "Caucasian, Jew or Other." While the history has been widely known for decades, the university is only now formally acknowledging it.

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