Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

February 18, 2013

The Cooper Union, which has traditionally awarded full scholarships to all students but which last year started charging tuition to graduate students, is again considering tuition for undergraduates, The New York Times reported. The move to start charging graduate students was designed to keep undergraduate education free, but officials at Cooper Union said that financial challenges may make it impossible to remain tuition-free. Many student and alumni critics, however, say that an important tradition is at risk, and some question spending priorities by administrators.

 

February 15, 2013

The bookstore at Missouri State University handed out more than 6,000 free book bags with the word "university" spelled as "univeristy," The Springfield News-Leader reported. The university spent about $70,000 on the bags.

 

February 15, 2013

Advocates for college wrestling programs -- many of which have been dropped in recent years -- fear that the Olympic decision to drop the sport will lead to more team eliminations, The Chicago Tribune reported. "It will give athletic directors with tight budgets a new excuse," said Jim Scherr, a former Olympic wrestler. "Over a decade or two, the impact will be significant."

February 15, 2013

Science and engineering research space at research-performing colleges and universities increased 3.5 percent from fiscal year 2009 to fiscal year 2011, growing to 202.9 million net assignable square feet, according to a new analysis from the recent data from the National Science Foundation. The biggest growth was in facilities for biological and biomedial sciences, which saw an increase of 8 percent. Details about the study are available here.

 

February 15, 2013

In today’s Academic Minute, Chris Wolff of the State University of New York at Plattsburgh reveals how fear of the unknown shaped culture during the peopling of North America. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.


 

February 15, 2013

A Pennsylvania judge ruled Thursday that a former student had failed to demonstrate that a professor at Lehigh University was arbitrary in an illegal way in awarding her a C+, Lehigh Valley Live reported. The judge said that he did have some questions about the grade, but that the former student had failed to show that the grade was for "anything other than purely academic reasons." The former student had sought $1.3 million, saying that the low grade blocked her from proceeding in the graduate program of her choice.

 

February 14, 2013

The Georgia Board of Regents on Wednesday approved plans for Kennesaw State University to start football, likely in 2015, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported. The plan approved by the board concerned financing for the football program and also additional sports to meet gender-equity requirements. Students voted for a fee increase of $100 per semester, to begin in the fall, to help pay for the program.

 

 

February 14, 2013

New research published in the Journal of Child and Family Studies suggests helicopter parents may be doing harm to their children's mental health, Reuters reported. Holly Schiffrin from the University of Mary Washington conducted surveys with undergraduates and found that those with excessively involved parents were more likely than others to be depressed or dissatisfied with life. Schiffrin said that the high degree of parental meddling appeared to interfere with the ability of offspring to feel autonomous and competent.

 

February 14, 2013

In today’s Academic Minute, Chris Kirk of the University of Texas at Austin reveals what the eyes of early mammals have to say about their nocturnal lifestyle. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

February 14, 2013

Saying that student borrowers have been left out of the "refinancing boom" that has resulted from low interest rates, Campus Progress, a branch of the Center for American Progress called for a federal program allowing refinancing for student loans — including private student loans — at a lower rate. Unsubsidized undergraduate loans, and all graduate loans, currently have a 6.8 percent interest rate. (The interest rate for federally subsidized student loans is set to double to 6.8 percent on July 1.) "Reduced student loan costs boost the likelihood of repayment while also stimulating the economy by freeing up income that can be used and spent in other sectors of the economy," the group wrote.

Pages

Back to Top