Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

December 21, 2012

Bobby Ukrop, a longtime supporter and trustee of the University of Richmond has quit the board amid debate over the institution's plan to replace soccer and track teams with lacrosse, The Richmond Times-Dispatch reported. He resigned after the board refused to reconsider the decision.

 

December 21, 2012

Official statistics from the National Collegiate Athletic Association suggest that steroid use is rare in college athletics. But an Associated Press investigation has found that many football players routinely gain 30 pounds or more of muscle a year, without any skepticism from their teams about possible steroid use. The investigation by the AP combined data on football players' weight with interviews with players and other experts, who described the ease with which athletes can escape detection for steroid use.

 

December 21, 2012

Carnegie Mellon police officers reported to Pittsburgh authorities that a threat had been made against Jared Cohon, the university's president, leading to 24-hour police presence at his home, The Tribune-Review reported. A spokeswoman for the U.S. Postal Inspector, which investigates crimes committed through the mail, said that the agency is assisting in the investigation.

 

December 21, 2012

James E. Hunton, a prominent accounting professor at Bentley University, has resigned amid an investigation of the retraction of an article of which he was the co-author, The Boston Globe reported. A spokeswoman cited "family and health reasons" for the departure, but it follows the retraction of an article he co-wrote in the journal Accounting Review. The university is investigating the circumstances that led to the journal's decision to retract the piece.

 

December 21, 2012

In today’s Academic Minute, Connie Shemo of the State University of New York at Plattsburgh explains the connection between the women’s foreign mission movement of the early twentieth century and two pioneering female doctors. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.


 

December 21, 2012

Late Wednesday the U.S. Senate passed legislation aimed at requiring colleges to be more transparent about how they serve veterans. The bill, which was approved during gridlock on Capitol Hill, had received broad support from veterans' groups, for-profit institutions and advocates for traditional higher education. First introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives by Rep. Gus Bilirakis, a Florida Republican, the legislation was less sweeping than a related Senate bill that quickly stalled.

December 20, 2012

Scientists in Spain have been holding protests all week over cuts to research budgets, Nature reported. Government spending on science has been cut by 39 percent since 2009. In Madrid, scientists released balloons to symbolize the departure of talent from the country.

 

December 20, 2012

Stanford University Press has started inviting authors to donate some or all of their royalties to a new fund with the goal of publishing more books by younger scholars. Alan Harvey, director of the press, said a few thousand dollars has been raised so far, and that more is likely -- especially when authors of some of the most popular books join the program. The funds will be set aside so that when the press is considering its ability to publish promising work by a young scholar, there is extra money available.

 

December 20, 2012

Senator Tom Harkin, an Iowa Democrat, will remain chairman of the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions in the next Congress, Harkin announced Wednesday. "I intend to move forward with bills to ensure that all Americans are able to achieve the promise of a quality education – beginning in early childhood, continuing through elementary and high school, and culminating with higher education," Harkin said in a statement.

December 20, 2012

The board of the District of Columbia voted Wednesday to fire Allen L. Sessoms as president, The Washington Post reported. A statement read by the board chair said that the trustees decided to go "in a different direction," but did not provide details. During the four years Sessoms was president, he helped create the university's community college -- a step many have said was long overdue for Washington. But Sessoms has been criticized for his travel expenses, and he has of late been proposing plans for significant budget cuts, including layoffs.

 

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