Higher Education Quick Takes

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Tuesday, January 11, 2011 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Pepperdine University's Robert Kaufman explores the need for continued research into missile defense. Find out more about The Academic Minute here.

Tuesday, January 11, 2011 - 3:00am

The subscription-based research database JSTOR, which contains backlogs of scholarly articles going back centuries, has announced plans to begin adding full-length books to its catalog. Scholars using JSTOR’s recently revamped search interface will be able to access relevant book content from certain university presses with whom the organization has partnered -- a list that currently includes the Princeton University Press, the University of Chicago Press, the University of Minnesota Press, and the University of North Carolina Press. Ithaka, JSTOR’s parent organization, has advocated for more collaboration among university presses in the digital age; Ithaka researchers foreshadowed this week’s move in a 2007 report suggesting that making book content available through searchable online repositories could help ensure that long-form scholarly content finds a way to customers. The JSTOR announcement comes just days after the Oxford University Press unveiled its own plan to expand its existing repository for long-form content, Oxford Scholarship Online, to include content from other university presses.

Tuesday, January 11, 2011 - 3:00am

A new study in the Journal of Personality finds that college students crave boosts in self-esteem -- such as receiving praise or a good grade -- above all other activities. Students ranked such ego boosting as more pleasing than having sex, eating favorite foods, drinking alcohol or seeing a best friend.

Monday, January 10, 2011 - 3:00am

Jared Lee Loughner, the suspect in the shootings of U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords and others on Saturday, withdrew from Pima Community College in October, after the college had suspended him. A statement from the college said that he was suspended after five contacts with college police officers and after the college discovered a YouTube video, made on a Pima campus, in which Loughner claimed that the college was an illegal organization under the U.S. Constitution.

Monday, January 10, 2011 - 3:00am

A student died in a track and field tryout at North Carolina A&T University, with his sickle cell trait blamed in the death, two days after a university official discouraged athletic officials from testing students for the trait until they made teams, The News & Record reported. Roland Lovelace, the chief athletic trainer, sent an e-mail to coaches saying that the tests cost too much to conduct on those just trying out. “Please do not send your student athletes to get a sickle cell test if they are participating in tryouts,” Lovelace wrote in an e-mail. “Please make sure they are actually on the team before this test is done. The reason for this is that the student health center is charging the athletic department for this test to be done.” Following criticism over athlete deaths linked to sickle cell, the National Collegiate Athletic Association required the test of athletes and those trying out, unless they sign a waiver, which the dead student did not do.

Monday, January 10, 2011 - 3:00am

More than 150 senior Israeli academics have signed a petition calling for an academic boycott of the Ariel University Center, in the Israeli-occupied West Bank, The Jerusalem Post reported. The petition states that the center was built on occupied land near areas where Palestinians lack human rights. A number of British academics have been working for years to organize academic boycotts of Israeli universities -- and these efforts have been opposed by academic groups not only in Israel but also in the United States. The Israeli organizers of the new boycott effort say that by distinguishing between a boycott of universities in Israel proper and the one built on the West Bank, they hope to fight efforts to stigmatize all Israeli universities.

Monday, January 10, 2011 - 3:00am

In today's Academic Minute, Elena Traister of the Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts looks at the state of America’s polluted rivers and streams and explains methods to restore them. Find out more about The Academic Minute here.

Monday, January 10, 2011 - 3:00am

Rowan University has agreed to pay Donald Farish, who had announced plans to leave when his contract expires in June 2012, $600,000 to leave a year early, The Press of Atlantic City reported. Paul Tyahla, executive director of the Common Sense Institute of New Jersey, criticized the buyout. "It’s become an unfortunate standard to compensate presidents on the way out.... Boards have become convinced that you don’t want a lame duck president for the last year, and so presidents should instead be paid for not being there," he said.

Monday, January 10, 2011 - 3:00am

California State University at Los Angeles incorrectly told about 500 students that their grades were too low to allow them to return to campus for the spring semester, the Los Angeles Times reported. While the students were on academic probation, their grades didn't disqualify them from enrolling. The university has since apologized for the error.

Friday, January 7, 2011 - 3:00am

A federal judge on Thursday ordered Johnson County Community College to reinstate a nursing student who was kicked out for placing a photograph of herself with a placenta on Facebook, The Kansas City Star reported. The judge granted the injunction requested by the student, ordering that she be allowed to finish up her courses from the fall and be admitted for the spring semester. The judge noted the belief of the students (disputed by the college) that they received permission to post the photos, which were taken while on a course visit to a health center. The dispute has prompted considerable debate and blog commentary. A statement from the college said that the student who sued (and three others who were also kicked out) would be admitted as ordered by the judge. "We are disappointed with the court's decision today," said the statement from Terry Calaway, the college's president. "The JCCC nursing program is widely known and respected for the quality of its instruction and its graduates. Sensitivity to patients and confidentiality of patient care is at the heart of what we teach. We took what we believed to be appropriate action, but the court saw the situation differently, so the student will be readmitted to the program."

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