Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

Subscribe to Inside Higher Ed | Quick Takes
Tuesday, July 26, 2011 - 3:00am

Chicago State University officials have been boasting about improvements in retention rates. But an investigation by The Chicago Tribune found that part of the reason is that students with grade-point averages below 1.8 have been permitted to stay on as students, in violation of university rules. Chicago State officials say that they have now stopped the practice, which the Tribune exposed by requesting the G.P.A.'s of a cohort of students. Some of the students tracked had G.P.A.'s of 0.0.

Tuesday, July 26, 2011 - 3:00am

Leading business schools are starting to convert their case studies -- at many institutions the central feature of M.B.A. education -- to tablet form, Bloomberg BusinessWeek reported. The change is significant because the new format allows students to immediately see the consequences of various decisions and for the case studies to become much more flexible and interactive.

Tuesday, July 26, 2011 - 3:00am

A study being published today in the American Sociological Review finds that young adults who were brought to the United States as immigrants without the legal authority to reside in the country do pursue an education, but rarely are able to use that education to get good jobs. The study found that one of the first times many of these young adults felt the impact of their immigration status was when they applied to college -- and realized that they could not seek financial aid. Just about half of those studied tried for some college education. But without the legal right to work in the United States, very few reported the kind of economic advancement associated with higher education. The study was conducted by Roberto G. Gonzales, an assistant professor at the University of Chicago’s School of Social Service Administration.

Tuesday, July 26, 2011 - 3:00am

Analysis of the manifesto left by Anders Behring Breivik, who has admitted

Tuesday, July 26, 2011 - 3:00am

Federal officials have launched a process for a major overhaul of rules governing the protections assured to people who are the subject of research studies, The New York Times reported. The revisions are intended to reflect changes in the research being done and to reduce red tape. Many researchers have historically complained about the cumbersome process for having their projects approved, but some critics have said that more scrutiny is needed of studies involving humans.

Tuesday, July 26, 2011 - 3:00am

Federal officials have undertaken a process for a major overhaul of rules governing the protections assured to people who are the subject of research studies, The New York Times reported. The revisions are intended to reflect changes in the research being done and to reduce red tape. Many researchers have historically complained about the cumbersome process for having their projects approved, but some critics have said that more scrutiny is needed of studies involving humans.

Monday, July 25, 2011 - 3:00am

Many public colleges in New Jersey have in recent years announced salary freezes for presidents, citing the budget cuts faced at the institutions along with the tuition increases being paid by students and their families. But an investigation by The Star-Ledger documented lucrative benefits that have remained in presidential contracts providing many of them with substantial additional funds during this time. Many of the presidents, for example, receive retention bonuses -- lump sum payments (in the six figures in some cases) for staying for certain periods of time. Other benefits: personal financial advisers and health club memberships, million-dollar insurance policies and unlimited gas.

Monday, July 25, 2011 - 3:00am

The University of Kansas has opened a new branch of its medical school -- for only eight students. The New York Times reported that the new campus, in Salina, in a rural part of the state, is part of an effort to attract more M.D.'s to work in rural parts of the state. The thinking is that by recruiting students from the region, and keeping them there, they won't be tempted to relocate to urban areas later. The curriculum will be more focused on typical problems faced in rural areas than on specialties.

Monday, July 25, 2011 - 3:00am

Kaplan Inc. has agreed to pay $1.6 million to settle a whistle-blower's suit charging that the company's CHI Institute, in Pennsylvania, enrolled students in a surgical technology program without having enough clinical placements for the students to graduate, The New York Times reported. About $500,000 in the settlement will repay student loans of those enrolled in the program. Kaplan did not admit any wrongdoing.

Monday, July 25, 2011 - 3:00am

Kaplan Inc. has agreed to pay $1.6 million to settle three legal matters at the company's CHE Institute, in Pennsylviania, including a whistleblower's suit charging that the campus enrolled students in a surgical technology program without having enough clinical placements for the students to graduate, The New York Times reported. About $500,000 in the settlement will repay student loans of those enrolled in the program. Kaplan did not admit any wrongdoing. About $225,000 will go to settle the whistleblower's suit.

Pages

Search for Jobs

Back to Top