Higher Education Quick Takes

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Thursday, March 8, 2012 - 3:00am

Five private colleges in West Virginia and Virginia are sharing some faculty slots, courtesy of a grant from the Teagle Foundation, The Charleston Gazette reported. Bethany, Davis & Elkins, Emory & Henry and West Virginia Wesleyan Colleges and the University of Charleston will share a single position for a professor to use distance education to teach remedial mathematics at all the campuses, with in-person assistance available at each college. Further, West Virginia Wesleyan and the University of Charleston will share an American history professor. Officials described the arrangements as a way to offer good instruction, while recognizing the financial pressures on small private colleges.

Thursday, March 8, 2012 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Nicholas Leadbeater of the University of Connecticut explains why the development of electric cars is limited by the availability of rare earth metals. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

Thursday, March 8, 2012 - 3:00am

A Michigan judge on Wednesday ordered Camille Marino to remove from her blogs and social media sites references to a Wayne State University professor she has regularly criticized for doing research with animals, The Detroit News reported. She was ordered to remove any threatening statements, as well as information about where the professor lives. Marino was arrested for violating the terms of a personal protection order obtained by the professor, Donal O'Leary, who studies the cardiovascular system. Some of his research involves dogs. Marino's lawyers said that they believe all of her blog posts were protected by the First Amendment.

Wednesday, March 7, 2012 - 3:00am

Cliopatria -- a group blog about history (broadly defined) -- is shutting down after more than 8 years of almost daily publication. Led by Ralph Luker, the blog attracted many historian/writers over the years who are web personalities, people like KC Johnson, Hugo Schwyzer, Claire Potter, Sean Wilentz and many others (including Inside Higher Ed columnist Scott McLemee). The blog was hosted by the History News Network.

Wednesday, March 7, 2012 - 3:00am

Florida State University has agreed to pay $75,000 each to two blind students who sued the institution, charging that it was using instructional materials that had not been made available in forms they could use. The university denied wrongdoing but agreed to examine various technology tools to make sure they are made accessible to all.

 

Wednesday, March 7, 2012 - 4:38am

Two Texas universities reported Tuesday that, working with community colleges, they can offer degrees that cost only $10,000 over four years, The Texas Tribune reported. Governor Rick Perry, a Republican, set that goal, whose feasibility was questioned by many educators. But Texas A&M at San Antonio is about to offer a bachelor's in information technology with an emphasis on cyber security that will cost about $9,700. And Texas A&M at Commerce will soon offer a bachelor's of applied science in organizational leadership for under $10,000.

 

Wednesday, March 7, 2012 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Terence Burnham of Chapman University reveals how economic negotiations are often influenced by testosterone. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

Wednesday, March 7, 2012 - 3:00am

Israel's Council for Higher Education has approved the nation's first plan to encourage universities to hire more women as faculty members, Haaretz reported. Women are well-represented in the student ranks and the junior faculty slots, but only 15 percent of full professors are women. The plan calls on universities to develop family-friendly policies, to appoint advisers to help presidents develop strategies for recruiting and to keep better data on the status of women in academe.

Wednesday, March 7, 2012 - 3:00am

Jack Scott, chancellor of the California Community Colleges, announced Tuesday that he will retire in September. Scott's career has mixed academe and politics. He has been president of Pasadena City College and Cypress College, and was an influential legislator on education issues during terms in California's Assembly and Senate. Scott became chancellor in 2009, and served in the role during a time of huge budget cuts and increased enrollment demands. California's community college system is highly decentralized, and Scott both pushed for more funds and for reforms that he said were needed in light of dwindling dollars.

Tuesday, March 6, 2012 - 3:00am

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau began accepting complaints is there a link to add in case people want to check out the process? dl about private student loans Monday, a first step the agency is taking in regulating the private student lending market. The bureau is the sole agency regulating complaints about these loans, and is also preparing a report on the private lending market"agency"? or should this be "market" or something? dl based on interviews with students, parents, college administrators and others, to be presented to Congress this summer. Before the agency, borrowers with complaints about their loans had to find a bank's regulator in order to lodge a complaint, which was effectively impossible, Rohit Chopra, the bureau's student loan ombudsman, said at a National Association of missing "Student" in name here ... dl Student Financial Aid Administrators forum on Monday.

The bureau is also investigating why students borrow the way they do -- including why they don't max out federal loan limits before turning to credit cards, second mortgages and other financial instruments, Chopra said.

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