Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

March 20, 2014

California's Bureau for Private Postsecondary Education has "consistently failed to meet its responsibility to protect the public's interests," a state audit released Wednesday said. The report from the California State Auditor cited a list of agency's shortcomings, including long backlogs of applications for licenses and delays in processing applications, failing to "identify proactively and sanction effectively unlicensed institutions," and conducting far too few inspections of institutions. The bureau, which the legislature created in 2009 after the state's previous regulatory body was killed, challenged the audit's negative conclusion but agreed with its recommendations for improving the agency's performance going forward.

 

 

March 20, 2014

The National Student Clearinghouse Research Center today released state-by-state data on the various pathways students take on their way to earning degrees and certificates. The data builds on a national report from 2012 that showed a more optimistic picture of college completion than other studies had found previously.

According to the report, 13 percent of students nationwide who first enrolled at a four-year public institution completed their credential at a different college. And 3.6 percent of students who began at a four-year public institution earned their first degree or certificate at a community college. Among other findings, the report also gives state-specific breakdowns of the proportion of students who began at community colleges and eventually completed at four-year institutions.

March 20, 2014

In today’s Academic Minute, Stephen Trumble, assistant professor of biology at Baylor University, explains how a whale’s ear wax can help us find definitive answers to a wide array of questions. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

 

March 20, 2014

The University of California on Wednesday released a "climate" report in which it analyzed survey results from students and employees across the university system. The results suggested that most people at the university feel comfortable, but that a significant minority do not. Twenty-four percent of respondents (breakdowns were not provided for different groups) reported that they "had personally experienced exclusionary, intimidating, offensive, and/or hostile conduct" at a university campus. And 9 percent said "that this conduct interfered with their ability to work or learn." Three percent reported that they had experienced unwanted sexual conduct at the university.

Among students, 69 percent of undergraduates and 78 percent of graduate students were satisfied with their academic experience. And 75 percent of undergraduates, 85 percent of graduate students, and 67 percent of postdocs said that they "felt valued by faculty in the classroom."

 

March 20, 2014

Philip Castille quit his job as president of the University of Houston at Victoria on Tuesday, after three years in office, The Texas Tribune reported. The Faculty Senate voted no confidence in Castille on Friday. In addition, many at the campus feared a plan by the main campus of the Houston system to start using a branch campus that has been a major source of revenue for the Victoria campus.

 

March 20, 2014

Facebook is the most used social media platform by school, college and university advancement officials, according to the latest version of an annual survey by the Council for Advancement and Support of Education, mStoner and Huron Education. Of respondents, 95 percent reported using Facebook, followed by Twitter (82 percent), LinkedIn (76 percent) and YouTube (68 percent). Those social media tools were popular last year as well. Instagram saw a major increase in use, from 27 to 43 percent of those responding to the survey.

 

March 20, 2014

California's community colleges and campuses in the California State University System both have made progress in encouraging the use of a two-year degree aimed at transfer, according to a new report from the Public Policy Institute of California. About half the state's community colleges now offer 10 or more versions of the transfer degree, the report found. And Cal State campuses have made "significant progress" in increasing the number of transfer degrees they accept in similar majors.

Challenges remain, however. The report said capacity constraints at Cal State may limit the degrees' promise. It also found that the lack of participation by the University of California means that the transfer degrees are not as much of a "statewide" pathway as intended by the ambitious legislation that led to their creation.

More work also needs to be done at two-year colleges, according to the report. Awareness among community colleges students about the degrees remains limited.

Last year California passed a bill to nudge community colleges and Cal State campuses to comply with the legislation's timeframe, which required all of the new transfer degree tracks to be completed this year.

March 20, 2014

Northampton Community College, in Pennsylvania, is among the institutions that called off spring break due to all the snow days that interfered with course sessions. So students this week, which would have been spring break, organized a staycation, and came to the college dressed for the beach, even if they were still going to class.

March 19, 2014

Okay, the rest of you have some catching up to do: Tom Panettiere has now won Inside Higher Ed's monthly Cartoon Caption Contest twice.

Today we publish the latest installment of our monthly cartoon contest -- we encourage you to suggest the most creative or humorous captions you can think of. (Or just read the submissions of your peers.)

We also encourage you to vote for your favorite from among the three finalists chosen by our judges from among the submissions for last month's cartoon.

And we congratulate Panettiere, associate director of financial aid and scholarships at the State University of New York at Purchase, whose caption for January's drawing -- "Wonder if our bus is stuck in one of those Chris Christie traffic studies?" -- won an overwhelming majority of your votes. He also won November's contest.

March 19, 2014

The student newspaper at John Brown University is being criticized by Hindu groups for publishing a column that attacked yoga because of its links to Hinduism. The op-ed in Threefold Online noted with concern the increasing popularity of yoga in the United States.

"As I have been thinking of all the arguments and reasons why yoga is not as beneficial as we’ve been led to believe, it all keeps coming back to the fact that yoga has its roots in the worship of demonic Hindu gods," the column said. "I believe that while yoga may offer some benefits, those benefits have hidden, demonic strings attached. I spoke to one of our chapel speakers years ago about this. He was a Dalit 'untouchable' from India who had become a Christian. His view is that yoga is the beautiful face that the very ugly religion of Hinduism uses to sell itself to Americans."

Rajan Zed, president of Universal Society of Hinduism, has called for the paper and the university to apologize.

The editor-in-chief of the paper has published a piece saying that the column does not necessarily reflect the views of the newspaper or the university.

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