Higher Education Quick Takes

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Monday, March 12, 2012 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Kevin Burke of Towson University examines the phenomenon of momentum in sports. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

Monday, March 12, 2012 - 4:29am

Admissions officers at the University of British Columbia medical schools, one of Canada's top medical schools, report increasing pressure from influential parents of applicants to admit them, The Vancouver Sun reported. Quoting from documents the newspaper obtained, the article cited as an example an applicant who ignored repeated e-mail reminders about deadlines for various materials, but who was allowed to file them late -- after an appeal from her well connected father.

 

Monday, March 12, 2012 - 3:00am

Union supporters in Michigan -- faced with a major setback at the University of Michigan -- are pushing for state constitutional protection. Legislation awaiting the governor's signature would classify graduate research assistants as students, not employees eligible for collective bargaining. If the legislation becomes law, it would undo years of efforts to organize the University of Michigan's research assistants. The Detroit News reported that in response to this and other legislative moves, Michigan unions (many of which aren't focused on higher education) are considering a drive to get a measure on the ballot in the state in which voters could add a provision to the state's Constitution declaring that no state law can limit the right of collective bargaining.

 

Friday, March 9, 2012 - 3:00am

A panel of state legislators in California on Thursday rejected a proposal by Gov. Jerry Brown to reduce spending on CalGrants, the state's generous financial aid program, the Los Angeles Times reported. Brown's plan would have reduced the amount of state aid that could be used at private and for-profit colleges, and also raised the minimum grade-point average for incoming students to qualify for grants.

Friday, March 9, 2012 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Roselyn Hsueh of Temple University examines the position of the Chinese economy after ten years as a member of the World Trade Organization. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

Friday, March 9, 2012 - 3:00am

Morlan Isom, a star goalkeeper for the women's soccer team at Louisiana State University at Baton Rouge, was the first female athlete ever named Homecoming Queen when she won that title last fall. Now, she is trying for a different distinction: becoming a kicker on the football team. The Shreveport Times reported that if she makes the team, she would be the first female in big-time college football since 2003.

Friday, March 9, 2012 - 3:00am

Harvey Perlman, chancellor of the University of Nebraska at Lincoln, has told an assistant football coach that it was inappropriate for him to give the stadium address as his own when offering his views to the Omaha City Council, The Lincoln Journal Star reported. Ron Brown, the assistant coach, urged the council not to ban discrimination based on sexual orientation. While Perman didn't question his right to offer his views, he objected to Brown giving 1 Memorial Stadium as his address. Perlman said that doing so may have created an impression that he was speaking for the university, which does not discriminate based on sexual orientation.

 

Friday, March 9, 2012 - 4:30am

Before he retired last summer as president of the University of Minnesota, Robert Bruininks steered extra money to the institute at the university where he would be spending his post-presidential years, The Star Tribune reported. He moved a total of $355,000 in university funds to the Center for Integrative Leadership. Bruininks told the newspaper that he moved the funds to the center to bolster it as he was seeking major outside grants for the program. "You put it all together in a weird way and it may look like I'm feathering a nest, and that's simply not the case," Bruininks.

Friday, March 9, 2012 - 3:00am

Saudi authorities are investigating how about 50 women were injured in a student protest at King Khalid University on Wednesday, BBC reported. The women were reportedly protesting poor management at the university and a lack of appropriate facilities for women.

 

Friday, March 9, 2012 - 3:00am

University of Illinois President Michael Hogan, who faced criticism from faculty in recent weeks about his handling of several initiatives, said in a statement Thursday that he accepted responsibility for a breakdown in communication and was committed to repairing his relationship with the faculty. On Monday, after a board meeting called to address the faculty criticism, the board chairman said he had confidence in Hogan but that the president needed to change how he was running the university or face the loss of his job.

In an interview with Inside Higher Ed on Thursday, Hogan said that coming into office on the heels of the university's admissions scandal, which resulted in significant administrative turnover, meant many changes had to happen quickly. In the rush to address those issues, he said, communication broke down. "We were getting things done so fast that I just gave people the perception that I was more interested in getting things done than I was in hearing opinions,” Hogan said. He said that is not the case, and that he plans to meet with faculty members on the university's three campuses more regularly in the future.

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