Higher Education Quick Takes

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Tuesday, November 22, 2011 - 3:00am

Indiana University on Monday formally returned a 15th century painting called "The Flagellation of Christ" to a Berlin museum from which it was stolen in the aftermath of World War II, the Associated Press reported. The painting was stolen by a British soldier and subsequently purchased from a gallery by Indiana's museum, with officials unaware that it was stolen.

 

Tuesday, November 22, 2011 - 3:00am

Several higher education associations have asked the Department of Defense to withdraw a new memorandum of understanding outlining the guidelines colleges and universities must follow if they wish to award educational assistance to military service members, citing requirements that the groups say are "incompatible" with many colleges' academic policies and practices. Specifically, the letter to Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta says that many institutions would choose not to sign the "memorandum of understanding" for the agency's Military Assistance Program because provisions related to the awarding of academic credit, residency requirements and other matters "are at odds with traditional assumptions about federal versus institutional control over academic affairs."

Tuesday, November 22, 2011 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Jonathan Bobaljik of the University of Connecticut reveals what we can learn from studying languages on the verge of extinction. Find out more about the Academic Minute here.

Tuesday, November 22, 2011 - 4:21am

Fifteen people were arrested Monday when students and others tried to enter a hearing of the City University of New York board on a possible tuition increase, The New York Times reported. The arrests followed a day of protests against the possible increase. During the scuffle between protesters and police officers, some students on higher floors of the building at CUNY's Baruch College dropped books down on the police. A statement from CUNY said that the hearing room was full, and that the confrontation took place when those protesting declined an offer to watch a live video of the hearing in an overflow room. The hearing went on as scheduled.

Tuesday, November 22, 2011 - 3:00am

Universidad de Artes, Ciencias y Comunicación, which is based in Santiago, Chile, and owned by a subsidiary of Apollo Group, Inc., may lose its accreditation. The National Accreditation Commission of Chile informed the college last week that its accreditation would not be renewed, according to an Apollo Group statement to investors. The college is seeking clarification about the pending action, and expects to appeal the decision.

Apollo, the parent company of the University of Phoenix, purchased the arts and communication university for at least $40 million in 2008. It has underperformed since then, posting an operating loss of $13 million last year.

Monday, November 21, 2011 - 3:00am

A report released today finds that colleges are sharing more information with the public about their efforts to measure student learning, but that they are not presenting the information in easy-to-understand ways and are providing little evidence that they are using the results to change their teaching practices. The report is the latest by the National Institute for Learning Outcomes Assessment to examine how transparent colleges are being about their efforts to gauge how successfully they are educating their students.

 

Monday, November 21, 2011 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Joan Teno of Brown University examines the usefulness of the stressful transitions faced by the elderly in the last stage of life. Find out more about the Academic Minute here.

Monday, November 21, 2011 - 3:00am

Parents are encouraging the growth of programs in China that enroll prodigies in universities many years before traditional college age, China Daily reported. Zhang Xinyang currently holds the record for youngest college student. He was 10 when he enrolled and is now, at 16, pursuing a doctorate in mathematics at Beihang University. About 1,400 high school students applied this year for just over 100 slots in a program for gifted youths at Xi'an Jiaotong University. The number of applicants has been increasing by 200 to 300 annually in recent years. The University of Science and Technology of China receives about 3,000 applications for the School of the Gifted Young each year, admitting only about 50 a year.

 

Monday, November 21, 2011 - 3:00am

A plane crash Thursday night killed Kurt Budke, the women's basketball coach at Oklahoma State University, and the assistant  women’s basketball coach, Miranda Serna. The crash took place in Arkansas, where they were on a recruiting trip.

Monday, November 21, 2011 - 3:00am

The Universities of Cambridge and Toronto have just announced fund-raising records for universities in Europe and Canada, respectively.

Cambridge announced that its fund-raising campaign in honor of the university's 800th anniversary has raised £1.17 (or about $2 billion), more than any European university has ever raised.

Less than two months ago, the University of British Columbia announced a $1.5 billion fund-raising campaign, at the time the largest such effort in Canada. Now the University of Toronto has that record, having launched a $2 billion campaign. Toronto has raised $966 million in the quiet phase of the fund-raising effort.

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