Higher Education Quick Takes

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Wednesday, February 1, 2012 - 3:00am

James Ammons, president of Florida A&M University, on Tuesday announced that he is temporarily banning all student clubs from recruiting, admitting or initiating any new members, the Associated Press reported. The announcement is the latest response to the hazing-related death of a member of the university's marching band. Ammons also announced that he is calling off a planned summer band camp.

Wednesday, February 1, 2012 - 4:32am

Legislators in Florida and Georgia are having contentious debates this week about undocumented students and public higher education. In Georgia, lawmakers are debating legislation that would bar from public higher education all students who lack legal documentation to reside in the United States, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported. At a hearing Tuesday, many spoke out against the bill, and lawmakers suggested that they would consider some flexibility for colleges. Last year, the state higher education system toughened its rules on such students, saying that they could not enroll in any college that is turning away qualified applicants. The issue has attracted considerable attention despite the relatively small numbers of students involved. Of the state system's 318,000 students, about 300 are undocumented, down from 500 before rules were tightened.

In Florida on Tuesday, legislation to help such students (by granting them in-state tuition rates) died in a tie vote in committee, the Associated Press reported.

 

Wednesday, February 1, 2012 - 4:33am

Federal authorities have charged Craig Grimes, a former professor at Pennsylvania State University, with fraud, making false statements and money laundering associated with $3 million in federal grants, the Associated Press reported. The charges relate to grants from the National Institutes of Health and the Department of Energy. Grimes did not respond to requests for comment.

 

 

Wednesday, February 1, 2012 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Martin Edwards of Seton Hall University explains why many countries around the world have embraced a high level of transparency concerning their economic performance. Find out more about the Academic Minute here.

Wednesday, February 1, 2012 - 3:00am

The University of Colorado at Boulder has dropped its SAT requirement for international applicants, The Boulder Daily Camera reported. Officials said that many international applicants reported difficulty finding test centers for the SAT (or for the ACT). However, Boulder has simultaneously moved to increase the minimum score required (from 61 to 75, on a scale of 120) for applicants to achieve on the Test of English as a Foreign Language.

 

Wednesday, February 1, 2012 - 3:00am

A senior White House education adviser took questions from college presidents Tuesday at the annual meeting of the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities, providing a few more details on the administration's plan to make college affordable. After a panel discussion of affordability issues, which featured college presidents sharing their methods for helping students with tuition and loan repayment, Zakiya Smith tried to alleviate some of the private colleges' concerns. The administration will focus only on net price, not list price, she said, adding that officials would seek input and advice from colleges and associations.

"We know this is a shared responsibility," Smith said. "Hearing about those things gave us hope, gave us promise." Several presidents emphasized that the Race to the Top-like fund for college affordability or other maintenance of effort clauses should require that state-level financial aid, which can help students attending private colleges, be maintained as well.

Wednesday, February 1, 2012 - 3:00am

One editorial board member has resigned and another may follow, after the publication in the Italian Journal of Anatomy and Embryology questioning the link between HIV and AIDS, Nature reported. The paper's lead author is Peter Duesberg of the University of California at Berkeley, who has for years questioned that link -- much to the consternation of most AIDS scientists who believe it has been well established.

Tuesday, January 31, 2012 - 4:16am

Claremont McKenna College admitted on Monday that it submitted inflated SAT averages to various rankings entities for the last six years, The New York Times reported. College officials said that the scores -- already high at the college -- were boosted by about 10 or 20 points each on the mathematics and critical reading sections. In the most recent data, the college reported a combined median scores of 1410, when the real median was 1400. The 75th percentile was reported as 1510 when it was really 1480. The college said a single individual -- identified by the Times as Richard C. Vos, vice president and dean of admissions -- admitted to inflating the numbers. Vos declined to comment.

Two law schools -- those of Villanova University and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign -- have admitted in recent years to have used inflated LSAT scores to improve rankings.

Robert Morse, who directs rankings for U.S. News & World Report, said this morning that Claremont McKenna did inform him Monday that it had provided incorrect data. But he said that the college declined his requests to provide raw data that would allow for a re-ranking of colleges. He said that it was possible that there could be modest changes in the college's ranking when correct numbers are provided. Morse said U.S. News would recalculate the data for the college, but only when it provided actual numbers, not just a summary with rough figures. (UPDATE: Morse has since reported that the college has made available all of its data.)

Tuesday, January 31, 2012 - 4:18am

Robert M. Franklin is stepping down as president of Morehouse College at the end of this academic year, after five years in office, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported. Given Morehouse's prominence among historically black colleges, Franklin has been a highly visible advocate for the education of black students. At Morehouse, he has been a successful fund-raiser, but has also embraced the bully pulpit role of the college president (a role associated with many Morehouse presidents), speaking out regularly about students' moral development and a range of ethical issues.

 

Tuesday, January 31, 2012 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Dean Goldberg of Mount Saint Mary College reveals how political campaigns came to rely so heavily on television commercials. Find out more about the Academic Minute here.

 

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