Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

December 19, 2013

Officials of the University of Colorado at Boulder continue to offer new reasons for why they told Patricia Adler, a tenured sociology professor, that she could no longer teach a popular course on deviance that attracts hundreds of students every semester (although they now say she could teach again if the course undergoes a review). The objections concern a lecture on prostitution in which Adler seeks volunteers from her assistant teaching assistants to dress up as various kinds of prostitutes and to discuss (in character) their lives. First, Colorado said that the university was concerned that the activity required approval by an Institutional Review Board. After many professors (and Colorado's IRB) noted that institutional review boards don't review classroom activities, Colorado acknowledged that there was no IRB issue, and said that some students complained that they felt pressure to participate in the exercise (which Adler and many past participants denied).

Then on Wednesday at a press conference, officials said that their primary concern was that some students in the class had their photographs taken (or videos made) of the class without their consent, The Daily Camera reported. Adler told the newspaper that students know that the class -- like many classes -- is videotaped, and that no complaints have been raised. She said come participants ask for copies of the videotape. The press conference followed a closed, emergency faculty meeting called to discuss the Adler case. The Daily Camera obtained a recording of the meeting, and said that "many faculty members angrily expressed their concerns and frustrations with the situation surrounding Adler."

 

December 19, 2013

Maranatha Baptist University has started the process of changing its mascot and team name away from "Crusaders," The Wisconsin State Journal reported.  Matt Davis, the university's executive vice president, said that there have not been controversies over the name, but that the university wants to avoid one. "In light of our global outreach and a more-advanced understanding of how things could be perceived, we want to avoid that," he said.

December 19, 2013

The Canadian Association of University Teachers this week called for colleges and universities in Canada to sever ties to Confucius Institutes, which have been set up at many Canadian (and American) campuses with support from the Chinese government. Supporters say that the institutes are a valuable way to expose more students outside China to Chinese history and culture. But critics say that the institutes present an oversimplified and positive image of China and that universities that want the house institutes may feel pressure to avoid certain topics. A statement from James Turk, executive director of the Canadian faculty group, said: “Confucius Institutes are essentially political arms of the Chinese government. They restrict the free discussion of topics Chinese authorities deem controversial and should have no place on our campuses."

 

Confucius
December 19, 2013

Trinity Western University has won final approval from authorities in British Columbia to start a law school -- the first faith-based law school in Canada. Gay rights and civil liberties groups had urged the provincial government not to grant permission, citing the Christian university's rules that ban students from "sexual intimacy that violates the sacredness of marriage between a man and a woman." Critics said that this ban effectively barred gay people from enrolling. The university said that it was not discriminating against gay people, only against those who have sex outside of heterosexual marriage. A statement on Wednesday from the university's president, Bob Kuhn, reiterated that point. "It needs to be said that all students (gay or straight) are welcome to attend Trinity Western University, providing they meet our academic requirements and agree to respect our community values. Like most religious communities, we have established a set of values and principles to guide our daily lives; ours are in a manner consistent with Christian teaching. Chief among those values is to show love and respect for all people at all times," he said.

 

December 19, 2013

Boundless, a startup that creates digital "textbook replacements," has settled with publishers Cengage, Macmillan and Pearson after the companies sued for violating their copyright, the company announced on Wednesday. The parties reached a confidential settlement that means Boundless can "continue doing what we set out to do on a high level throughout the world of education," CEO Ariel Diaz said.

The publishers brought the lawsuit against Boundless in March 2012, alleging the company had copied the ideas and presentation of Pearson's Biology, Cengage’s Principles of Economics and Macmillan Higher Ed’s Psychology. Boundless's alternatives were eventually rewritten. The case has been in remediation since May 2013, "but it’s nice to get it over the line," Diaz said.

In a joint statement, the publishers said "We are very pleased to reach a resolution regarding our case with Boundless. We will continue to safeguard the rights of our authors and take action against the misappropriation of our content by any and all parties."

 
December 19, 2013

A new report from the Center for American Progress proposes reforms to improve the connection between higher education and employers. Stackable credentials, competency-based education and more structured pathways for students are promising practices that can help bridge this gap, according to the report, which was written by David A. Bergeron, a former U.S. Department of Education official who is vice president for postsecondary education at the center. The report includes several recommendations for policy makers and accreditors that could encourage the faster adoption of those emerging approaches.

December 19, 2013

The Southern Illinois University at Carbondale chancellor and athletics director stated their support for the head men’s basketball coach Barry Hinson on Wednesday, after Hinson spent several minutes of his post-game press conference (see video below) raging about athletes’ poor performance in the team's 73-65 loss Tuesday night. Among other things, the coach called them "uncoachable" “mama’s boys,” called a specific player by name “PG-rated” and “absolutely awful,” said his wife could have made more baskets, and joked that “there was a sniper in the gym” and that athletes who fell on the court got “sniped.”

Hinson told USA Today Sports on Wednesday that he stood by everything he said, but apologized for singling out the one player. “Let’s get something straight,” he said. “I didn't grab anybody, I didn't hit anybody. I didn't even use profanity. I just want my kids to play harder. You've gotta be able to criticize in this society. I want what's best for my players.”

The coach also said he had the support of Athletic Director Mario Moccia. In a statement sent to Inside Higher Ed, Chancellor Rita Cheng called Hinson “a coach who cares deeply about his players and their success.”

“Last night, his passion for his team merged with his frustration for its performance, resulting in some unfortunate statements that I know he regrets,” Cheng wrote. “We always hope that all of our coaches will publicly support our teams and student athletes regardless of the score. Barry understands and agrees with this principle, and I’m confident that he will work to embody it as he continues to rebuild our team.”

Twenty months into the job, Hinson has 16 wins and 25 losses.

 

 

 

December 19, 2013

In today’s Academic Minute, Robert Levenson of the University of California at Berkeley explores the genetics nature of marital satisfaction. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

 

December 19, 2013

California's Legislative Analyst's Office (LAO) wants the state's government to devise criteria for determining which for-profit institutions are most at risk for having questionable business practices. In a newly released report, the agency said state regulators should exempt most for-profits that hold regional accreditation from their reviews, freeing up resources to conduct targeted oversight. Possible factors that could be used to determine which institutions need extra scrutiny could include "school ownership, types of programs offered, track record of operation in state and performance criteria," the report said.

December 19, 2013

A Delaware State University who was suspended after being accused of rape and subsequently cleared of criminal charges is suing the institution, several administrators and his accuser under civil rights laws, the Delaware Online reported. 21-year-old Andre L. Henry is at least the seventh person to take an institution to court after being disciplined for sexual assault. Inside Higher Ed reported in August an apparently new trend of men suing under Title IX, the same federal statute that women point to when alleging campuses failed to protect them from sexual assault. This week, Bloomberg reported that the number of lawsuits had grown to a half-dozen.

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