Higher Education Quick Takes

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Tuesday, March 13, 2012 - 4:10am

Canadian athletic officials gathered last weekend to discuss what they consider a worrisome trend: Most of the top female hockey players in the country go to colleges and universities in the United States, The Edmonton Journal reported. Many said that Canadian universities have failed to put enough money into their programs, frequently operating with just a head coach, and not the assistant coaches found on teams in the U.S.

Tuesday, March 13, 2012 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Carol Worthman of Emory University explains a project designed to reveal natural sleep patterns that are becoming rare in our increasingly technological world. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

Tuesday, March 13, 2012 - 3:00am

Sessions on alien spirituality, ghost hunting equipment and a case study in alien abduction headlined the University of Nebraska at Omaha’s Paranormal Symposium, which included 17 hours of “logical, scientific and rational explanations of UFOs and other paranormal phenomenon.” About 20 people, including at least two faculty members, attended the third-annual weekend event, the Omaha World-Herald reported. It wasn’t immediately clear whether any aliens joined in the festivities.

Dave Pares, a professor of geography and meteorology, was among those leading discussions on the presence of life in outer space. "There's been more than one alien civilization that's been here, observing," Pares told the World-Herald. "They are here now, observing."

The extraterrestrial seems to be a popular topic at the college. Nebraska-Omaha has a Paranormal Society, a UFO Study Group and two weekly campus radio shows devoted to alien life.

Monday, March 12, 2012 - 3:00am

Open records requests by The Independent have revealed that British universities have found that 45,000 students cheated in the last three years. Officials blamed the sophistication of digital cheating techniques, the pressure to succeed in higher education and (from critics of the expansion of higher education) increased enrollments of students who may not have been well-prepared. Thirteen universities reported discovering finding, on average, more than one case of cheating a day.

Monday, March 12, 2012 - 3:00am

The man who went on a shooting rampage at a University of Pittsburgh clinic last week had been a graduate student in biology at Duquesne University until that institution barred him from its campus, The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reported. John F. Shick, who was shot by police officers responding to the incident, was barred because Duquesne found that he had been sending harassing text and e-mail messages to female students.

Monday, March 12, 2012 - 3:00am

China's government is encouraging its universities to hire more Western academics, The New York Times reported. Much of the recruiting is through the Thousand Foreign Experts program, which aims to recruit 1,000 people from outside China to work in Chinese universities over the next 10 years. Similar efforts in the past have focused on Chinese immigrants to Western countries, but the new program is designed to attract top academic talent without existing ties to the country.

Monday, March 12, 2012 - 4:22am

Peter Thiel is the investor, entrepreneur and philanthropist who likes to deride college as pointless. He even offers fellowships for talented students to drop out of or stay out of college. So what's he doing this spring? He'll be teaching at Stanford University, Reuters reported. His course, "Computer Science 183: Startup," is already full, and students are enthusiastic.

Some at Stanford question the idea of having as an instructor someone who questions the rationale behind college. Vivek Wadhwa, a fellow at Stanford's Rock Center of Corporate Governance, said, "It's hypocritical, but I'm not surprised.... The same people who go around bashing education are the most educated. What's he going to do? Tell students, 'When you graduate from my class, drop out right after that?' "

That may just be correct. Thiel, through a spokesman, told the news service of his course: "If I do my job right, this is the last class you'll ever have to take."

Monday, March 12, 2012 - 3:00am

The Towson University chapter of Youth for Western Civilization, a group that says it promotes traditional American values but that many critics view as anti-minority, caused a furor on the campus last week. The Baltimore Sun reported that the group's members chalked "white pride" in several campus locations. "As a black student, those words scared and concerned me," said Kenan Herbert, president of the Black Student Union. "A lot of other students and I feel unsafe with this organization being on campus." The university says that the chalkings are protected by the First Amendment.

Monday, March 12, 2012 - 4:25am

The University of California at Berkeley has demoted Diane Leite, formerly an assistant vice chancellor, for giving several raises to a purchasing manager, Jonathan Caniezo, with whom she was having a sexual relationship, Bay Area News Group reported. The manager's immediate supervisor, who reported to Leite, objected to the raises as inappropriate. Between 2007 and 2010, a period of deep budget cuts for the university, the manager's pay was increased in a series of raises from $70,000 to more than $110,000. Leite and her lawyer did not respond to requests for comment. Her pay was cut from $188,531 to $175,000.

 

Monday, March 12, 2012 - 3:00am

The University of Calgary student body's new vice president for student life won her election after using an unconventional campaign poster. The Calgary Herald reported that Hayley Wade placed posters seeking votes on top of urinals in men's rooms on campus. Underneath a photograph of the candidate is the tag line "Great dick bro!" While Wade won, the Herald noted that her mother was not pleased with the campaign tactic.

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