Higher Education Quick Takes

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Wednesday, May 12, 2010 - 3:00am

Under a plan pushed by Gov. David Paterson, most state employees -- including faculty members at the four-year campuses of the City University of New York and the State University of New York -- will be furloughed for one day next week. The furloughs apply only to state employees, which exempts community college faculty members, who are considered local employees. The university systems say that they will try to carry out the furloughs in ways that are least disruptive, which may be particularly challenging given that they will take place at the end of the academic year. The City University of New York scheduled its furloughs for Friday, May 21, but also said that any faculty members with teaching or proctoring duties on that day should be furloughed on another day that week.

The faculty unions for both CUNY and SUNY are protesting the furloughs, holding protests at the governor's office and backing legal challenges to the furloughs.

Wednesday, May 12, 2010 - 3:00am

It's the time of year -- after one class has been admitted and before the next year's cycle is fully under way -- that colleges tend to announce they are ending standardized testing requirements. And Southern New Hampshire University has just done so -- becoming the second institution this month in in the state to make such a shift.

Wednesday, May 12, 2010 - 3:00am

John T. Casteen III, president of the University of Virginia, met with Gov. Bob McDonnell Tuesday to urge reforms in state law so colleges would be informed of the off-campus arrests of their students, The Charlottesville Daily Progress reported. Casteen noted that the university was never informed of an incident in which the student who is facing murder charges in the death of another student this month was arrested in 2008 and allegedly threatened a police officer. “Information of that kind would have lit up our system,” Casteen said. “Students who do those sorts of things would find themselves suspended immediately … In any event, I would like to know if one of my students threatened to kill a police officer.”

Wednesday, May 12, 2010 - 3:00am

Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn has vetoed a scholarship reform bill, arguing that it does not go far enough, the Chicago Tribune reported. The legislation concerns scholarships that legislators are allowed to award the scholarships to whomever they want in their district -- and critics have noted for years that these scholarships frequently go to the relatives of political contributors. The legislation that the governor vetoed would have banned the awarding of scholarships to anyone whose family could be linked to a contribution in the previous five years, but Quinn said that was not enough. "A scholarship program that is not based on need or merit, I don't think is a proper thing for our state. That's why I vetoed this bill and urged the legislature to abolish this program," he said.

Wednesday, May 12, 2010 - 3:00am

John McHugh, secretary of the Army, has withdrawn as commencement speaker at the State University of New York at Oswego, telling officials there that "it is clear my presence at the ceremony might well have a disruptive effect." Some students planned to wear buttons and others to engage in potentially louder protests of the military's "don't ask, don't tell" policy. The university stood by the invitation, amid criticism of some on campus. “Civic responsibility is demonstrated as much in free expression as it is in listening to different views on important subjects,” said Deborah F. Stanley, the president. She added that she “regretted missing a chance to see our free society in meaningful and educational exchange.”

Tuesday, May 11, 2010 - 3:00am

Saint Anselm College is ending the requirement that undergraduate applicants submit SAT or ACT scores. The college will keep the requirement, however, for nursing students. Nancy Davis Griffin, dean of admission, said in a statement: "Six years of data show that, at Saint Anselm, the best predictor of academic success is a record of academic achievement in rigorous high school coursework."

Tuesday, May 11, 2010 - 3:00am

The Board of Regents of Murray State University voted 6-2 to condemn a special sex-focused section in The Murray State News, the student newspaper, the Associated Press reported. While some board members asked for information on how many tax dollars supported the newspaper, President Randy Dunn said that seeking to cut funds would be "dangerous territory."

Tuesday, May 11, 2010 - 3:00am

Lawmakers in Louisiana are pushing legislation that would severely limit the work of law school clinics that provide free legal services -- a measure that campus officials say would force many such clinics to close, The Times-Picayune of New Orleans reported. The legislation sponsored by a state senator would bar university law clinics from suing government agencies in court, among other things. It is widely acknowledged to be aimed at Tulane University's environmental law clinic, which was the focus of a similar push more than a decade ago and was characterized by one business leader as having a "wanton disregard for the economic well being of the state," the Louisiana newspaper reported. The legislation in Louisiana follows a move by legislators against a law clinic at the University of Maryland, and prompted a letter to Louisiana senators from the Clinical Legal Educators Association that reads, in part: "The provisions in this bill demonstrate a failure to understand the importance of providing access to legal representation to all citizens, rich or poor, and the structure of contemporary legal education. Those supporting this bill appear more concerned about protecting favored businesses from compliance with the law and punishing the state’s universities than about higher education and access to justice."

Tuesday, May 11, 2010 - 3:00am

Though the American Association of Medical Colleges will fall short of its goal of seeing the number of first-year seats in M.D. programs grow 30 percent by 2015 over 2002 levels, enrollment projections collected from member medical schools and released Monday suggest continued growth toward that goal. Projections suggest that first-year M.D. program enrollments will total 20,281 in 2015, a 23 percent increase over 2002. The association expects to reach the 30 percent goal in 2018. Growth has been steadiest in existing medical schools -- 102 of the 125 institutions accredited prior to 2002 have expanded their enrollments, though some institutions have slowed expansion because of the recession. In 2009, 12 schools announced plans to reduce their enrollments, mostly for financial reasons.

Osteopathic medical schools also continue to grow. Data provided to the AAMC by the American Association of Osteopathic Colleges of Medicine projects that its members' first-year enrollments will total nearly 6,300 in the fall of 2014, more than double what they were in 2002. First-year seats in M.D. and D.O. programs are estimated to total 26,550 by that fall, close to 7,000 more than in 2002. But, the AAMC cautions, that growth will put greater pressure on graduate residency programs, which have grown by only about 1 percent annually.

Tuesday, May 11, 2010 - 3:00am

U.S. Rep. Loretta Sanchez has withdrawn as a graduation speaker at the University of California at Riverside, honoring a boycott called by the union that represents custodians, technicians and other campus workers, the Los Angeles Times reported. The American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, which is opposing layoffs and other cost saving moves by the university, called the boycott and is predicting other speaker withdrawals as well. Sanchez issued a statement saying: "My family roots are in organized labor and, in good conscience, I cannot and will not cross the picket line to speak. I wish nothing but the best for this year's young graduates and hope they will respect my decision to stand in solidarity with my union brothers and sisters," Dwaine Duckett, the university's vice president for human resources, criticized the boycott, saying that "graduations are about students — their achievements, family support and sacrifices -- not the advancement of [the union's] ideological and political agendas."

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