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December 20, 2009 - 8:46pm
An occasional correspondent writes:I've applied for a dean of students position for which I know I'm unusually well-qualified and temperamentally suited. However, thanks to the economy and the desirability & location of this school, I also know there will be as many as several hundred other well-qualified applicants. The handful of us lucky enough to get an interview will be asked to campus for a full day.If you or any of your readers have any suggestions for day-long interviewing for a dean position (as opposed to a faculty one), I'd be glad to hear them.
December 20, 2009 - 8:24pm
One year ago I made a series of 8 predictions for learning technology in 2009. Below are the predictions, with an accompanying evaluation that in most cases tries to explain why I got most things so wrong.
December 20, 2009 - 4:22pm
Recent discussions on this blog about gender balance in colleges and universities have sparked a number of memories of my own college experiences. I thought it would be interesting to share them here and to invite you to share yours, as well.As noted previously, in 1970 I entered a small college that had, until that year, been the “sister school” of a nearby men’s university. There were only a handful of men in my class, and of course none in the more advanced classes.
December 20, 2009 - 3:48pm
I have a deep-seated ambivalence when it comes to the Huffington Post. On the other hand, I have a long-time respect (to the extent that I can respect any politician) for a former Senator named Fritz Hollings from South Carolina. Hollings recently wrote a column for the Huffington Post.
December 18, 2009 - 4:39pm
The report from the Institution of Mechanical Engineers that I referenced yesterday calls for a three-part approach to climate change: mitigation, adaptation and geo-engineering. I guess I'm comfortably with that break-down on a theoretical basis, or for purposes of discussion, but I'm not real comfortable with the idea of geo-engineering -- at least, not on any large scale.
December 18, 2009 - 1:25pm
Dalkey Archive Press is the largest publisher of translated literature in the United States, but Associate Director Martin Riker makes clear to visitors that Dalkey believes literature is an international art form that transcends national boundaries. One result of all this is that not all their books are by writers working in other languages, and not all are fiction. Riker also cheerfully admits they publish books to their own tastes.
December 17, 2009 - 9:54pm
A new correspondent writes:I'm in the market for for an administrative position in higher ed, and as I've been interviewing, I've noticed two distinct approaches to budget cuts. The first is an across-the-board cut: all departments (or employees or some other variation on this theme) get a 5% cut. The second is to pare underperforming departments and to spare the remaining ones any significant cuts. Any general thoughts?I could have sworn I had done a piece on this old chestnut, but a quick search didn't reveal one. That's okay; it's worth revisiting anyway.
December 17, 2009 - 9:51pm
1. Learning technology coheres into an academic discipline: offers courses, has a theoretical foundation, conducts research, peer review, and a shared identity. 2. Innovation in teaching methods becomes a major factor in tenure and promotion.3. Increased movement of campus resources toward learning technology.4. Normative that learning technology professionals design and teach or co-teach courses (as part of regular compensation).5. Erosion of distinction between on-ground, hybrid and online learning (best method for each purpose).
December 17, 2009 - 9:47pm
Our jobs as professors are built around truth and integrity. We spend our research time searching for the truth, and, once we find a piece of it, we teach and profess that truth in journals and classrooms, hence earning us the name of "professor." Indeed, if someone was to claim our idea as their own, we would be outraged, as we rightly are if our students claim work to be their own when it is not.
December 17, 2009 - 3:10pm
“The ancient Romans had a tradition: whenever one of their engineers constructed an arch, as the capstone was hoisted into place, the engineer assumed accountability for his work in the most profound way possible: he stood under the arch.” - Michael Armstrong (former Chairman of AT&T)I don't know whether Armstrong's literally correct on that one or not. In fact, I don't really care. It's one of those stories that, if it's not true, it should be. And it's not like some ancient Roman is going to rise up and tell Armstrong he's wrong.

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