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May 3, 2011
The Australian government, still the major funding agent of higher education, (although much less so than was the case 20 years ago) has an ambitious agenda. The government wants to raise the proportion of Australians with at least a first degree from the current ratio of around 32% (for those aged between 25 and 34 years) to 40% by 2025. Part of a wider agenda is to widen access to higher education for marginalised socio-economic groups, including the poor, rural and remote populations, and indigenous students.
May 2, 2011
The Boy and The Girl are old enough now to play sports, but still too young to drive. (Right now we’re in baseball and softball season, respectively. Many of the games start at 5:00. 5:00! Don’t people work?) The end-of-semester event crunch at the college is in full swing, with the rubber chicken circuit becoming so active that some nights are double-booked. TW is increasingly involved with local politics, attending school board and town council meetings on a frequent basis as she fights the good fight for the schools.
May 2, 2011
So I've downloaded 307 first chapters free from Amazon to my Kindle. (There must be a way to automatically convert an Amazon Wish List to downloaded Kindle samples - I'm hoping that I'm just too clueless to figure it out.)What I'm wondering is if having 307 free first chapters on my Kindle can tell us anything the future of higher ed in general, and the academic library in particular?Here is What I Do Know:
May 2, 2011
Recently I was talking to my daughter about her summer plans. “It’s hard, Mom,” she said. “I have to make a commitment before I have all the information.”“Welcome to adulthood,” I replied. I felt for her. We try to amass as much information as possible before making commitments, but in the end, many adult choices involve best guesses, hopes, and a great deal of faith. Jobs, marriages, and children are among the obvious examples of commitments made without full information, but there are others, perhaps less weighty but still important, in daily academic life.
May 2, 2011
According to Big Think, we are "drowning in information." I can relate to that statement. Lately, my own content consumption has almost been overwhelming.
May 1, 2011
A few years ago, at a job interview in another state -- it would have been the worst fit ever, but I didn’t know that at the time -- I ran across a program in which the local community college more or less gives its syllabi to local high schools, and allows the local high school faculty to teach their courses for college credit. (Of course, the students have to pay tuition to the cc.) It flew under the banner of “dual enrollment.”
May 1, 2011
I work at a university on the quarter system. Complaint about quarters makes for constant campus conversation, but I remain strangely fond of the system. Their alignment with the seasons permits an academic poetry of which I approve.
May 1, 2011
How dependent is your university on airplanes and airports? The degree to which we are all tied into the jet economy is probably bigger than any of us realize.
May 1, 2011
Hashtags have become digital rally points for Twitter users. We ask questions, create community, post answers, and engage in social-media-based professional development via #-based conversations.
May 1, 2011
A few weeks ago, Hofstra Law School organized a one day conference on cyberbullying. I had the opportunity, in my capacity as Hofstra’s Provost, to say a few words at the beginning of the conference but I stayed for the keynote address because as a parent and also as a school board member, the topic has special importance for me. In my remarks I mentioned a news story that attracted major attention a few years ago where a 49 year old mom was convicted on misdemeanor charges for posing as a 16 year old boy on MySpace.com.

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