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An open drawer in a filing cabinet.

Measuring Censorship Is Hard, and Stopping It May Be Harder

Censorship often comes from scientists themselves, driven by laudable motives, Musa al-Gharbi and Nicole Barbaro write.

A panoramic view of the University of California, Berkeley, campus as seen from a distance, with the bell tower rising above the other buildings.

Access, Fairness and Graduate Programs in the Humanities

In favoring applicants from elite private institutions, graduate programs in the humanities are shutting out talented students, Timothy Hampton writes.

The book jacket for Chip Colwell's "So Much Stuff: How Humans Discovered Tools, Invented Meaning, and Made More of Everything."

We Are All Hoarders Now

Scott McLemee reviews Chip Colwell’s So Much Stuff.

A birthday cake with candles reading "Happy Birthday."

Happy (?) First Birthday to ChatGPT

ChatGPT has introduced new tensions to professors’ dual roles as educators and assessors, Jeremy Davis writes.

A jar of change, labeled with the word "Retirement," next to a clock.

A Dignified Retirement

Much more data are needed to help bring about equitable benefits for adjunct faculty, Adrianna Kezar and Jordan Harper write.

A professor speaks to a student in his lecture hall class, as other students are working on assignments.

Academic Self-Regulation Interventions Can Promote Success for All

For first-generation students as well as their peers, professors can break down barriers to allow students to excel, writes Pola Ham, an assistant professor of occupational therapy.

The flags of Israel and Palestine, respectively, flying against a blue sky.
Opinion

Colleges Fail in Teaching on Israel, Palestine

For too long colleges have been content with managing tensions around the conflict without taking a more proactive approach to student learning, David H. Schanzer writes.

A young woman reading a book.

The Best Reason to Major in English

When did faculty stop believing that it’s important to tell young people to study what they love, Sarah Wasserman asks.