Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

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Monday, April 20, 2015 - 3:00am

Three people were shot at a fraternity and sorority cookout at Delaware State University Saturday, The News Journal reported. Those who were shot were hospitalized and reported to be in stable condition. Early Sunday morning, shots were heard in a university parking lot.

 

Monday, April 20, 2015 - 3:00am

Female faculty members at a unit of the University of California at Los Angeles medical school faced biased treatment, "demeaning" treatment and retaliation for reporting violations of research rules, The Los Angeles Times reported an internal investigation has found. The results of the probe have not been released but were obtained by the Times and confirmed by UCLA.

 

Monday, April 20, 2015 - 3:00am

More than 50 University of Connecticut students en route to an event for seniors in Boston narrowly escaped a burning bus Saturday, ABC News reported. The students reported that they smelled smoke and were told by the driver that there was not a problem. A short time later, the smoke returned, with flames, and the students managed to get out just before the bus exploded.

 

 

Monday, April 20, 2015 - 3:00am

A Turkish educator, Enver Yucel, has pledged $10 million and is seeking more funds to build universities in Turkey for Syrian refugees, NPR reported. His argument is that the huge population of refugees from the civil war in Syria is unlikely to be able to return home any time soon. Instruction would be offered in Arabic, English and Turkish.

 

Monday, April 20, 2015 - 3:00am

The University of Hong Kong has announced plans to require all students to spend time studying in mainland China and also in another country, The South China Morning Post reported. Details of the requirement and any exemptions are still being worked out. Generally, there is strong support for the idea that students should study abroad. But some are concerned about the impact on students who for various reasons (such as past participation in protests) are unable to or do not want to study in mainland China.

 

Monday, April 20, 2015 - 3:00am

In today's Academic Minute, Sandee McClowry, professor of counseling psychology at New York University, shows the impact of adapting to students’ needs and playing on their strengths. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

Friday, April 17, 2015 - 3:00am

Social science groups are speaking out against a Republican-proposed bill to reauthorize the National Science Foundation that would keep total NSF funding relatively flat but impose deep cuts on the division that supports social science research. An analysis by the Consortium of Social Science Associations notes that most NSF divisions would see their authorization levels go up, but that the social science division would have its authorization level cut by more than 45 percent. Many Republicans in Congress have criticized federal support for the social sciences.

 

Friday, April 17, 2015 - 4:29am

An Inside Higher Ed article in January looked at how some law schools are admitting applicants with much lower Law School Admission Test scores than would have been admitted in the past. A new article from Bloomberg looks at the top of the LSAT range. It finds that as of March 2015, the number of law school applicants who have scores of 165 or higher (on a 120 to 180 scale) is about half of what it was in 2010.

 

Friday, April 17, 2015 - 4:27am

More than 500 people rallied at Colby College Thursday to protest recent racist comments on the social media service Yik Yak. Earlier in the week, a small group of Colby students held a protest against police violence against unarmed black people. The Yik Yak comments followed, mocking the protest and many going further into making bigoted comments about the protest and black people. Colby President David A. Greene told the gathering Thursday: “Those who raise their voices in support of social justice deserve our gratitude and our attention. Those who promote bigotry and targeted hatred have no place at Colby.”

Friday, April 17, 2015 - 3:00am

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Online Education Policy Initiative, an offshoot of a recent task force on the institute's future, officially launched on Thursday. The initiative, which is funded by a grant from the Carnegie Corporation of New York, will over the next nine months release reports, host workshops and lecture series, and eventually make recommendations about online learning. Sanjay E. Sarma, director of digital learning, and Karen Willcox, professor of aeronautics and astronautics in the aerospace, will lead the initiative.

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