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Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - 3:00am

While many colleges won't sell alcoholic energy drinks, the University of New Hampshire is considering a ban on non-alcoholic energy drinks such as Full Throttle and Red Bull, the Associated Press reported. In fact, the university announced a ban on the sale of such products Monday, but backtracked later in the day and said it would study the idea further before imposing a ban. (This updates an earlier version of this item, based on the reported ban.) "The University of New Hampshire is committed to making its campus the healthiest in the country," Rick MacDonald, assistant director of dining at the university, said when explaining the idea behind the ban.

Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - 3:00am

The Delegate Assembly of the United University Professions, the faculty union of the State University of New York, has adopted a package of measures designed to promote the interests of non-tenure-track faculty members. The UUP, affiliated with the American Federation of Teachers and the American Association of University Professors, pledged to adopt a system in which adjuncts who go on and off payroll can remain members of the union. Further, each campus chapter will have an officer focused on contingent issues, and at least one spot on the statewide union's executive board will be held by someone off the tenure track.

Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - 3:00am

Jane Sanders resigned Monday as president of Burlington College, citing unspecified differences with the college's board, The Burlington Free Press reported. Speculation about her departure has been rampant since the disclosure of a board agenda with an item labeled "removal of the president."

Monday, September 26, 2011 - 3:00am

Baylor and Brandeis Universities, both universities that have faced faculty-president conflicts and struggled to find the right balance for their religious ties, have turned corners, according to separate articles. The New York Times examines Kenneth Starr's performance at Baylor, where he is being called a "unifier." The Forward says that Frederick Lawrence has achieved "near rock star status" at Brandeis.

Monday, September 26, 2011 - 3:00am

The White House and the U.S. Department of Labor are expected to announce the recipients of what is supposed to be the first round of grants -- worth a total of $500 million -- from the Trade Act Assistance Community College Career Training Program. The program, originally created in lieu of the American Graduation Initiative as part of the Student Aid and Fiscal Responsibility Act of 2010, was unveiled by the Obama administration in January and heralded as "the largest investment in two-year institutions since the G.I. Bill." It is supposed to provide a total of $2 billion over four years.

The grants to be announced today are expected to be of between $2.5 million and $5 million for individual institutions and $2.5 million to $20 million for consortiums of colleges (the consortiums can include four-year institutions, but the lead partner must be a college that offers degrees or certificates of two years or less).

Monday, September 26, 2011 - 3:00am

For several years now, groups that question affirmative action have organized bake sales to make their point -- sometimes attracting little attention and sometimes setting off widespread debate. Republican students at the University of California at Berkeley are planning a "diversity bake sale" for Tuesday, and they appear to be falling into the latter category. Postings by the Republicans on Facebook say that the event is to protest legislation -- currently before Governor Jerry Brown -- that would authorize the state's public universities to consider race in admissions decisions. (California voters banned such consideration in a referendum whose backers vow to challenge the legislation if Governor Brown signs the bill.) The Republican announcement of the bake sale states that a differential pricing system will allow for "equitable distribution of baked goods to our diverse student body." White people will be charged $2 per pastry, Asian people $1.50, Latinos $1, African Americans 75 cents, and Native Americans 25 cents. Women will be allowed to take 25 cents off their racial or ethnic price point. Comments posted on The Daily Californian's website show some people calling the bake sale racist, while others say it is humorous.

Monday, September 26, 2011 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Barbara Gold of Hamilton College reveals how Christians of the late Roman Empire created the modern concept of what it means to be a martyr. Find out more about the Academic Minute here.

Monday, September 26, 2011 - 3:00am

Faculty members at the University of Rhode Island are demanding an investigation into the unexpected resignation of Andrew Winters, who was assistant to the vice president of student affairs, and whether his departure has to do with his work advising a gay student group, The Providence Journal reported. The student group held a sit-in to protest what it considered inadequate efforts to support gay students on the campus in February, and many students and faculty members praised the group for focusing attention on the issue. But Winters received a reprimand shortly after the incident, leading to the questions about his departure. The university said that he retired, and denied that he was forced out.

Monday, September 26, 2011 - 3:00am

The London School of Economics has clarified its ties to a controversial author, noting that she is not currently on the sociology faculty, Times Higher Education reported. Many have questioned how the London School of Economics could have a sociologist such as Catherine Hakim, whose book Honey Money: The Power of Erotic Capital has been criticized for suggesting that women advance themselves through erotic means. On the book jacket, Hakim is described as "senior research fellow of sociology" at the school, but officials there said Hakim has not been employed at the university since 2003.

Monday, September 26, 2011 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Barbara Gold of Hamilton College reveals how Christians of the late Roman Empire created the modern concept of what it means to be a martyr. Find out more about the Academic Minute here.

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