Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

Subscribe to Inside Higher Ed | Quick Takes
Monday, November 28, 2011 - 3:00am

The U.S. Justice Department has sued the University of Nebraska at Kearney, charging that it illegally denied a student with a psychological disability the right to have an "emotional assistance dog" live in a residence hall room. The suit, which follows allegations brought last month by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, charges that the university asks too much information of students with emotional or psychological or emotional disabilities and -- in the case of the request for the dog -- was too stringent in barring the animal from a dormitory. A university spokesman said he couldn't comment on the case except to say that the university will contest the suit. The Associated Press quoted an e-mail message from the university's compliance director for the Americans With Disabilities Act (cited in the suit), that says that if the student's request had been granted, "in essence, anyone can have their doctor say they are anxious and need to have their cat, dog, snake or monkey."

 

Monday, November 28, 2011 - 4:27am

The father of Bradley Ginsburg, who as a freshman at Cornell University killed himself by jumping off a gorge bridge in the fall of 2010, is suing the university for $180 million, The Sun Sentinel reported. The suit says that Cornell should have informed parents about the start of what would be a string of student suicides so they could be more active in dealing with any mental health issues their students were experiencing. The suit also charges that the university -- which now has barriers on the gorge bridges -- should have had them there previously. The Ithaca Journal quoted a Cornell spokeswoman as declining to comment on the suit except to predict its dismissal.

 

Monday, November 28, 2011 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Jeffrey Green of the University of Pennsylvania explains the specific actions that define political charisma. Find out more about the Academic Minute here.


 
Monday, November 28, 2011 - 4:30am

Last week, when a City University of New York board hearing was held at Baruch College, student protests of a possible tuition hike led to 15 arrests. With the board planning to meet later today, Baruch announced on Saturday that classes that were to meet in the same facility will be postponed until December 2, and that only access to the building will be granted only to those with "an urgent and legitimate need to be in the building." A message from Mitchel Wallerstein, president of the college said that "we are determined to avoid any repetition of the regrettable events that occurred" at last week's board hearing.

Monday, November 28, 2011 - 3:00am

Rochester Institute of Technology announced Wednesday that the president of RIT Dubai, Mustafa Abushagur, is taking an eight-month leave to serve as deputy prime minister in his native Libya. Abushagur has been in exile for decades because of his opposition to the deposed government there, and was on the "most wanted" list there until the recent revolution. After helping out Libya, he plans to return to his position at RIT Dubai.

 

Monday, November 28, 2011 - 4:33am

"Violin Concertom," a piece by Finnish composer and conductor Esa-Pekka Salonen was Sunday named the 2012 University of Louisville Grawemeyer Award for Music Composition. Salonen is principal conductor and artistic advisor for the Philharmonia Orchestra of London.

 

Monday, November 28, 2011 - 3:00am

The three American students who were arrested last week during protests in Egypt are now back in the United States, the Associated Press reported. Egyptian authorities accused the students of throwing firebombs from the roofs of buildings. But the students said that they never were on any rooftops, never threw anything and never harmed anyone. The three Americans were in study abroad programs at American University in Cairo. "I was not sure I was going to live," said Derrik Sweeney, a Georgetown University student, after arriving back in the United States.

Wednesday, November 23, 2011 - 3:00am

The family of a donor to Johns Hopkins University is suing the university, claiming that administrators are violating the intent of a gift agreement made when Elizabeth Beall Banks sold a 138-acre farm to the university at a discounted price in 1989. The university plans to develop the land into a science park as part of an economic development plan created by Montgomery County, Md. While the deed limits the use of the property to “agricultural, academic, research and development, delivery of health and medical care and services, or related purposes only,” which a spokesman for the university said the institution is abiding by, the family claims that the university is developing the property too densely and for commercial purposes, violating the original agreement. The university has not formally responded to the suit.

Wednesday, November 23, 2011 - 4:40am

The University of California at Davis plans to drop all charges against the students on whom it used pepper spray last week, and also will pay their medical bills. Chancellor Linda P.B. Katehi made those announcements Tuesday night at a town hall meeting on campus, The Sacramento Bee reported. With calls growing for her resignation, Katehi is speaking out more about her views on what happened.

An Associated Press account of Tuesday's meeting said that Katehi said she barred the police from using force. "I explicitly directed the chief of police that violence should be avoided at all costs. It was the absolute last thing I ever wanted to happen," Katehi was quoted as saying. "Because encampments have long been prohibited by UC policy, I directed police only to take down the tents. My instructions were for no arrests and no police force."

Wednesday, November 23, 2011 - 3:00am

Florida A&M University has called off all performances by its marching band, amid reports that one of its members who died over the weekend in Orlando was the victim of hazing, The Orlando Sentinel reported. Law enforcement officials said that they believed the death was hazing-related. Officials at Florida A&M said that they had received seven reports of hazing over the last decade.

Pages

Search for Jobs

Back to Top