Higher Education Quick Takes

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Monday, October 15, 2012 - 3:00am

Alvin E. Roth and Lloyd S. Shapley were this morning named winners of the 2012 Nobel Memorial Award in Economics "for the theory of stable allocations and the practice of market design." Roth is a professor of economics and business administration at Harvard University. Shapley is professor emeritus of economics at the University of California at Los Angeles.

 

Monday, October 15, 2012 - 3:00am

The Faculty Council of the College of Arts and Sciences at Saint Louis University has voted no confidence, 35-2, in the university's president, the Rev. Lawrence Biondi, The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reported. Faculty leaders are angry over a recent proposed post-tenure review policy that they say would have effectively gutted tenure protections. Many faculty members say that the administration has stopped consulting with them on key issues. The university "has now become a place of tyranny," said Timothy Lomperis, a political science professor. The administration declined to comment on the faculty vote.

 

Monday, October 15, 2012 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Tim Lockley of the University of Warwick explains why 19th-century yellow fever epidemics hit some segments of Savannah’s population harder than others. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

Monday, October 15, 2012 - 3:00am

The Australian Human Rights Commission has issued principles to protect the rights of international students enrolled in Australia. The principles are intended as a guide for universities, government entities and others on which the students rely for fair treatment. The four principles call for "enhancing the human rights of international students," "ensuring all international students have access to human rights and freedom from discrimination protections," "understanding the diverse needs of international students" and "empowering international students during their stay in Australia." For each principle, a series of concrete measures are outlined. For instance, enhancing the human rights of international students is defined as including access to health care while in Australia, affordable places to live, access to safe public transportation and more.

 

Monday, October 15, 2012 - 3:00am

Sylvester Oliver, who was until recently a professor and director of humanities at Rust College, is in jail facing charges that he raped a student, WREG News reported. Investigators said that the allegations stem from an incident a month ago, but that the student came forward two weeks later. David L. Beckley, president of the college, said via e-mail that the case is in the hands of the police department, but that Oliver "is no longer employed" by the college.

Monday, October 15, 2012 - 3:00am

The University of Wyoming said it removed a controversial sculpture from campus on schedule and because of water damage. But The Casper Star-Tribune, based on e-mail records it obtained, said that the schedule was moved up amid concern about how the sculpture was offending the coal industry, legislators and donors. The large sculpture, "Carbon Sink: What Goes Around, Comes Around," featured coal and wood sinking into the earth, and was viewed by many as anti-coal. The e-mail records show university officials worried about the fallout from those criticizing the sculpture, and reaching out to let them know that the work was being removed. The e-mails also show considerable anger over the sculpture. An e-mail from Bruce Hinchey, president of the Petroleum Association of Wyoming, said: "The next time the University of Wyoming is asking for donations it might be helpful to remind them of this and other things they have done to the industries that feed them before you donate.... They always hide behind academic freedom but their policies and actions can change if they so choose."

 

Friday, October 12, 2012 - 3:01pm

William C. Friday, who led the University of North Carolina for three decades and was as close as anyone to being the prototypical college president who was also a national leader, died today at 92. Friday's long and storied career touched most of the major issues in higher education, from academic freedom to integration to big-time college sports, and his personal grace and political instincts proved formidable tools to enable him to handle them deftly. More on Friday's life and career will be published Monday.

In the meantime, here is an appreciation of Friday by a longtime aide and an expert on academic leadership, Art Padilla. And here are some of the news articles and tributes to Friday that have been published in his home state.

Friday, October 12, 2012 - 3:00am

Harvard Law School, which for the past six years has conducted phone interviews with applicants for admission, is switching to videoconferencing. The law school also said that it wants to expand the number of applicants interviewed. "The interviews will give applicants additional opportunities to present themselves, and also to engage with folks here and learn more about the school,” said a statement from Jessica Soban, chief admissions officer. "We expect that these face-to-face conversations will offer candidates a more personal and satisfying way to let the Admissions Office learn about their strengths."I sent harvard a buncg of questions, like how many applicants will get these, will they all have a shot, etc. and the law school is working on answers, so hope to add detail -sj

Friday, October 12, 2012 - 3:00am

Various studies have shown strong backing for President Obama among many academics, but a new survey finds Mitt Romney winning one college constituency. Asked whether they would prefer to sit next to Obama or Romney at a home football game, college football fans preferred Romney by a margin of 53 to 42 percent, USA Today reported. However -- and this could be crucial for Midwestern swing states -- Obama won a majority of fans in the Big 10.

 

Friday, October 12, 2012 - 3:00am

Last month Inside Higher Ed introduced its Cartoon Caption Contest, and the response was overwhelming: Hundreds of you suggested captions or otherwise weighed in. Today we publish the second installment -- get those creative juices flowing -- and give you a chance to pick your favorite from among the three finalists we've chosen from the many submissions about September's cartoon. Remember: the winner of each month's contest wins a $100 Amazon gift certificate. Join the conversation.

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