Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

November 12, 2013

Sylvia Manning, president of the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, has announced that she plans to retire in July, she confirmed in an email to Inside Higher Ed. From her post as leader of the nation's largest regional accreditor, Manning has been a high-profile voice in the intensifying debate over accreditation. She is also widely credited with leading the commission's tougher approach on for-profit education. A search for her successor will be announced soon, Manning said.

November 12, 2013

The Chicago Tribune reported Monday on a rare circumstance poised to occur this week: the firing of a tenured faculty member by the University of Illinois Board of Trustees. The Tribune article states that the case appears to represent the first time the Illinois board has been asked to weigh in on a tenure review decision. The case involves Louis Wozniak, who was removed from teaching several years ago over an email he sent to students that was perceived to have sexual overtones, one of several points of conflict that have led university administrators to seek to revoke his tenure. A faculty committee cleared him of most of the charges filed against him, but Illinois officials have argued that his continued flouting of one demand justified his firing.

 

November 12, 2013

In today’s Academic Minute, Joel Beam of the University of North Florida examines what the body of research says about the best method for treating wounds. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

November 12, 2013

First Lady Michelle Obama -- who has focused many of her public efforts on fitness, nutrition and military families -- will today start a new effort related to higher education, The New York Times reported. Obama will be focused on encouraging more low-income students to pursue higher education, and will draw on her own background as a child from a working-class family who earned degrees from Princeton and Harvard Universities.

November 12, 2013

A former professor of French at Wittenberg University in Ohio is suing the institution -- along with local police and media -- following his acquittal on rape and kidnapping charges in a case involving a developmentally disabled man, the Associated Press reported.

Hollant (Max) Adrien filed a federal civil rights lawsuit last week seeking reinstatement and $2 million in damages from Wittenberg, which fired him last year, before the case went to trial. In lieu of reinstatement, he's seeking $10 million. He's also seeking $50 million from local police and $110 million combined from six news outlets. A Wittenberg spokeswoman said via email that while the university doesn't comment on pending litigation, "we are confident that our institution was lawful and consistent in our policies and procedures in connection with Max Adrien."

November 12, 2013

The women’s ice hockey teams from Bemidji State and Ohio State Universities broke a decade-old record Friday night, but it’s not one their institutions will be bragging about. In a brawl that broke out as the game ended, athletes racked up 287 penalty minutes and 19 game disqualifications, both National Collegiate Athletic Association records for any division or gender, Deadspin reported. The total number of penalty minutes incurred during the game – 303 – breaks the 2004 record of 268, set by the men’s hockey teams at Boston University and the University of Maine.

 

November 11, 2013

edTPA, the new "performance-based" assessment tool and career-entry test that measures teacher preparation, is "fully operational" and ready for nationwide use after a two-year field test in about two dozen states, American Association of Colleges of Teacher Education officials said Friday. The assessment, which has drawn criticism from some educators who say it could override authority of teacher programs and faculty, uses new and purportedly more valid tools, including videotapes and and evidence of student work and learning to determine whether a teacher is prepared to run a classroom from day one. Currently, preparation is measured in part via a multiple-choice test of basic skills and subject matterisn't it also now measured by student teaching that is supervised? -sj *** this is what AACTE said; I guess to show the differences in approach  -ag. Only about 58 percent of the 12,000 prospective teachers who attempted edTPA during the field test would have passed. AACTE notes in a report that factors including a lack of consequence for test-takers and lack of support systems or appropriate coursework among teacher programs, which will presumably improve as more institutions use the assessment.

November 11, 2013

At an event last week, two Bay Area members of the U.S. House of Representatives were aggressively critical of the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges for its treatment of City College of San Francisco, the San Francisco Chronicle reported. Reps. Jackie Speier and Anna Eshoo, both Democrats, said they hope the three lawsuits filed by supporters of City College will prevent the college from losing its accreditation next year. 

November 11, 2013

The massive open online course provider edX announced a new open-source platform on Friday: Edraak, an online education platform for Arabic-speaking students. The Queen Rania Foundation for Education and Development, which promotes efforts to strengthen education in Jordan, will use Open edX, the MOOC provider's open-source platform, to feature select courses translated into Arabic. As the platform grows, faculty members in Arabic-speaking countries will contribute their own courses. The creation of Edraak follows expansion initiatives in France and China.

Note: This article has been updated to clarify that Edraak is an independent platform, not an edX consortium.

November 11, 2013

Many medical schools are trying to grow, but Vanderbilt University has announced it is shrinking its medical school admissions and Ph.D. admissions at its medical center by 10 percent, The Tennessean reported. Jeffrey Balser, chief of the university's medical center, said that "our priority must be quality, not quantity."

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